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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,421

    Default Weather.com just said tonight that corn was way above record harvesting..???

    Just happened to see while visiting www.weather.com that corn had a record year.....harvesting thier biggest harvest ever.......
    SOOO, tell me AGAIN why horse feed prices have skyrocked this fall?????
    Check out www.weather.com if you question this.............grrrrr!
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Plainview, MN
    Posts
    3,496

    Default

    I don't think thats right. In what area of the country? Much of the U.S. had terrible grain and hay crops due to the drought. Minnesota fared okay.

    "For the second straight year, drought shrank the Minnesota corn harvest. The current federal estimate of 156 bushels an acre would be about 10 percent below normal.

    Minnesota's 156 bushels is 27 percent better than the national average."
    http://minnesota.publicradio.org/dis...-corn-harvest/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Plainview, MN
    Posts
    3,496

    Default

    Read the story the OP referenced, the record crop is soybeans in Arkansas. It goes on to say that Arkansas had a better than average corn harvest, especially compared to some states harder hit by the drought.

    florida foxhunter I think you need to gather more information before you start jumping up and down.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,421

    Default

    Just thought I'd bring the article to everyone's attention.........I was surprised to see it!
    Actually we had TOO MUCH rain this summer and our hay couldn't dry enough in the field to be baled......there will be hay around here,but it'll be yellow from getting rained on, and may have too much moisture in the middle (although the hay folks did the best they could)
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    I think I remember reading that this year there was a record number of acres in corn. At the beginning of the growing season, when it was warm 2 weeks early and still raining) they were saying that it was going to be a bumper crop.

    Then it stopped raining.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    I think I remember reading that this year there was a record number of acres in corn. At the beginning of the growing season, when it was warm 2 weeks early and still raining) they were saying that it was going to be a bumper crop.

    Then it stopped raining.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
    Posts
    2,421

    Default

    Anyone holding thier breath to see if feed prices drop if we have a better cropyear next year? It seems everything goes up retail wise, but we seldom see it come back down........
    My hay has gone up for various reasons, but it never seems to goback down!
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,054

    Default

    Well, with corn specifically, even if there's a good crop ethanol will drive the price up.

    But it certainly wasn't a good corn crop around here. Most of it can still be fed to cattle, but as silage. Someone whose field I passed on the way home today round-baled dried feed-corn stalks. We just didn't have decent weather--too hot and dry, then too cold and wet. And now it's looking like it's going to be a nasty winter. Fun fun.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,359

    Default

    FF, hay has a major component of petroleum. To plant and
    fertilize the crop, to mow, rake and bale. To transport from
    the farm to you. All take significant amounts of fuel as well
    as labor and machinery. And good soil and weather. Now,
    soil and weather are not in human control, but cost of hired
    help has gone from $5 to $10 an hour over the two decades
    I have been haying. And you know what fuel prices have
    done; tractors and delivery trucks need fuel just like your
    car does, except they need more as they are (usually) bigger. Hay prices do go down when there is a bumper
    crop and the price of inputs drops.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,231

    Default

    http://www.agweb.com/crops/corn/
    Corn

    The 2012 U.S. corn crop is forecast at 10.725 billion bushels, 19 million bushels larger than the October forecast. The U.S. average corn yield is forecast at 122.3 bushels, 0.3 bushels larger than the October forecast. The production forecast for the rest of the world was a fraction higher than the October forecast, with smaller forecasts for Europe and Mexico, offset by slightly larger forecasts for Southeast Asia and Russia.
    Consumption of U.S. corn during the current marketing year is projected at 11.167 billion bushels, 17 million larger than the October forecast, reflecting an increase in the expected consumption for food and industrial purposes. However, the projection of imports was increased by 25 million bushels, to a total of 100 million bushels, so that the projection of ending stocks was increased by 28 million bushels.
    Ending stocks for both the U.S. and the world are expected to be much smaller than stocks at the beginning of the marketing year. The marketing year average farm price is now projected in a range of $6.95 to $8.25, $0.25 lower than the October projection.
    New projections differed from market expectations in several aspects. U.S. production is larger than expected, the forecast of the Argentine crop was not reduced as some thought might happen, and the projection of year ending stocks exceeds expectations. The corn market will now be influenced by the development of the South American crop, with emphasis on weather conditions in Argentina following an extremely wet October, and the ongoing rate of consumption, particularly the pace of exports.
    The Crop Production and Grain Stocks reports to be released on January 11 will be closely watched for changes in the production forecast, with some change in the forecast of harvested acreage expected, and for the revealed rate of domestic feed and residual use of corn.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



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