The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    4,425

    Default Alternative to "Durasole": something that doesn't have formaldehyde in it?

    I know a lot of people who use Durasole around the inside edges of the shoe as a disinfectant to help prevent growth of nasty stuff.

    The staff at my barn are great and picking horses' feet out when the come in front turnout. However, this is a time of year in my area where there is some on and off rain, maybe some snow, and definitely some muddy patches in the pastures that just can't be avoided.

    I was considering Durasole until I found out that it has formaldehyde in it. What are some other products that will do similar things but not have that in it?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,233

    Default

    Are you looking for a disinfectant or a hoof-hardener? Betadine solution would probably work if you want a disinfectant, venice turpentine for a hoof hardener. Any reason for the strong aversion to formaldehyde?
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    4,425

    Default

    I would be using it (or the alternative) as a disinfectant so "bugs" have less of a chance to grow during a time of year when conditions can be wet and muddy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2003
    Location
    Orlean, Virginia
    Posts
    2,960

    Thumbs up How about.....

    Venice turpentine or icthamol or any of the hoof treatments for thrush....read the labels is my best suggestion!!
    Iodine/betadine good. Anything w/alcohol for example.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

    Default

    I just dicovered white lightening soaks has AMAZING results for thrush, white line and horses with crappy feet. Read up on it.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,443

    Default

    In addition to formalin (which is formaldehyde gas dissolved in methanol) , Durasole contains gentian violet - a strong antimicrobial that lasts a long time. I am not aware of any other commercial product that will continue disinfecting and prevent future microbes from growing after it is applied as well as Durasole.

    Not sure what your objection is to formalin because once it cross-links with the horn it becomes chemically inert. Once the methanol evaporates, so does the "formaldehyde."

    It is not like you bought some plastic product or insulation that was manufactured with urea-formaldehyde and it keeps off-gassing and releasing toxins in your home for years.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2113 View Post
    I just dicovered white lightening soaks has AMAZING results for thrush, white line and horses with crappy feet. Read up on it.
    Great stuff for disinfecting. But it only works for about 45 minutes. After that, nothing remains to prevent further microbes from invading.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    4,425

    Default

    Someone asked what my objection was to Formalin/formaldehyde...

    I'm thinking primarily of the disposable gloves I'll be using whenever I put the stuff on.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    My farrier makes up a marvelous concoction of various ingrediants to use as a sole dressing. My horses are barefoot or barefoot behind and doing great. I sue his sole dressing on the ones that don't really need durasole. It is "sticky" enough to cling to the sole and viscous enough to soak in. It also has anti-bacterial and fungal ingrediants. Love the stuff, and it smells marvelous. I also use it on the nail holes and around the shoe/foot intersection of the shod ones. My horses have amazing feet.

    I am talking to him about marketing the stuff. Do you think there would be a market for a sole dressing that is sort of between Durasole and Venice Turpentine?
    friend of bar.ka



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,837

    Default

    Nitrile gloves are resistant to formalin. But you're not supposed to paint your hands with it.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    4,425

    Default

    Yes, I know all about the different types of gloves and what they are resistant to. I don't like the waste though if I can possibly help it. I feel bad about throwing all that stuff in the trash. I suppose I could get non-disposable ones, but want to investigate alternative hoof care products first.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,575

    Default

    I have a pair of handyman gloves that I wear at the barn for work and riding, as I find they hold up better than "riding" gloves. I wear those when I apply durasole.

    But even if I manage to forget my gloves somewhere, it's just not difficult to keep durasole off your skin. You're applying a small amount and it pretty much goes where you tell it.

    Pulling out the nitrile is really overkill.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    43

    Default Farriers Fix Hoof Oil

    I started using Farriers Fix Hoof Oil with good results. I used Durasole also and it worked but I find the farriers fix to be easier to apply. I pulled my horse's shoes 4 months ago because his feet were falling apart and I couldn't keep shoes on him. I rode on a cross country course yesterday barefoot and he was just fine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,837

    Default

    I just apply it with my bare hand, using the bottle. There's really no need for gloves as long as your careful.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2006
    Posts
    42

    Default

    My understanding is that formaldehyde is carcinogenic. I used to use keratex. i painted it on with a brush but it would still drip on my hands. Then one day my horse jerked his foot and the paint brush splashed the stuff in my eye. Its not worth the risk to me. I threw out the bottle.

    Now I use Tuf-foot. www.tuffoot.com
    I also like Sore No More the Sauce



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    5,935

    Default

    I think the better question is what is not a carcinogen these days. Its not hard to not get it on you. The bottle has a squeeze top. Very easy application and really is one of the best products on the market. Don't sell your horse short, if you are worried just get some reusable kitchen rubber gloves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,998

    Default

    I really like durasole, but for what you are looking for, seems good old iodine would work. I'm no more fond of iodine on my skin than durasole or keratex, so wear gloves for all. But I'm usually wearing gloves no matter what I'm doing with grooming and barn stuff!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,575

    Default

    I've not used this product or even heard of it before today, but did spy it in the latest Valley Vet catalog and it would perhaps suit for your purposes. It doesn't look like it would thicken or harden the sole, but if you're just looking for some sort of disinfectant...

    http://www.lifedatalabs.com/life-dat...nfectantr.html

    There's also this stuff from Keratex:

    http://www.keratex.net/frog_and_thrush_disinfectant.htm


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Great stuff for disinfecting. But it only works for about 45 minutes. After that, nothing remains to prevent further microbes from invading.
    I do soaks as a total clean out twice a week then totally dry frog/soles (cool hair dyer)and then apply the medicine. Of course medicine is applied daily(i use durosole or Life Data antisceptic).
    I swear by the cool hairdyer then treat with Life Data Antisecptic.
    I treat thrush as i do with any wound infections:CLEAN &DRY then treat.

    Other than enclosing hoof in a jar what would prevent microbes fom re-entering?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2005
    Posts
    6,769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Herefordgirl View Post
    I started using Farriers Fix Hoof Oil with good results. I used Durasole also and it worked but I find the farriers fix to be easier to apply. I pulled my horse's shoes 4 months ago because his feet were falling apart and I couldn't keep shoes on him. I rode on a cross country course yesterday barefoot and he was just fine.
    Love this stuff. Has worked the best out of all the things I've tried including Durasole. I really liked VT but it was so sticky.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: Sep. 16, 2013, 05:46 PM
  2. Alternative to the "big yellow" eventing watch
    By Sonoma City in forum Eventing
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Jun. 26, 2012, 04:47 PM
  3. Anyone living an "alternative" lifestyle?
    By theblondejumper in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: May. 15, 2012, 08:37 AM
  4. "Alternative" living arrangements?
    By GoForAGallop in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Dec. 26, 2011, 09:09 PM
  5. Replies: 55
    Last Post: Aug. 16, 2010, 04:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness