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View Poll Results: Does your horse property have a fence between the horse facilities and any public roa

Voters
171. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes – Property is fenced with a gate at the drive way – gate stays closed.

    72 42.11%
  • Yes – Property is fenced, but driveway gate stays open / no driveway gate.

    57 33.33%
  • No – Property is not fenced from the road.

    42 24.56%
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Results 21 to 40 of 51
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    5,717

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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post

    Have any of y'all ever known a horse to get loose and leave all the other horses on the place and flee for parts unknown? Just curious - it seems to me that would be kind of counter to their herd instincts. Although that seems to be what happened with the horse on the other thread.
    Yes. The few times I have seen a horse genuinely panicked, they have gone hell bent for leather in whatever direction they happened to end up going in. Unfortunate.

    Naughty horses breaking away while getting on the trailer/busting some crossties for the heck of it/etc? Those are the jerks who run around the property with a flagged tail, riling everyone up and generally causing havoc, and then come running for the grain bucket.

    I can think of seven or eight barns in my area (large ones, 20+ horses) that have road front fencing/gates. It is just simply a MUST if you live near a busy roadway. The ones that don't have gates are the ones in quieter areas, where if the horse gets out you deal with some angry homeowners with pock-marked lawns, not dead drivers.

    I mentioned it on the other thread, but if a driver gets hurt/killed by a loose horse, the lack of any safe fencing keeping the horse on the property is going to be the first thing that the lawyers bring up.
    Well isn't this dandy?



  2. #22

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    Nope, pastures are fenced, but the residential part of the property (which is in front of the barn) is not fenced.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
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    3,051

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    My house is at the front of my property. The driveway to the barn area is on the north side of the house. You have to go through one gate to get to my back yard, and open another to the back section where the barn and horses are. That area is completely fenced and gated. There have been a couple of times where I left the gate from the back yard to the barn area open...and the horses got out of their stalls and then wandered into my yard to graze and explore. Because the front gate is always closed there was a happy ending to their great adventure. I live in a horse friendly area, but there is a lot of traffic once you leave my street. It just makes me sleep better at night.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    5,650

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    Quote Originally Posted by exvet View Post
    Our property has a perimeter fence with a couple of gates which we keep closed actually because of our dogs. Here range grazing is still practiced. It's the land owner's responsibility to fence their acreage/property if they want to keep things out (as opposed to in).
    Yep, the cattle our jerk neighbor doesn't even attempt to keep in are a big part of why our entire property is fenced. He actually puts up barbed wire to detract horses from riding on his property at all, but doesn't bother to connect it into an actual fence, and lets his cattle wander wherever - including a road with a 55mph speed limit. Due to our open range laws, if a cow runs out in front of your car and you're going the speed limit and can't stop, you owe the owner for his cow. It's happened in our area.

    There are also many people who see no need to keep their dogs in despite leash laws here, and several of them formed a pack and were attacking horses.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    836

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    I've never boarded at a facility with a gate/perimeter fencing.

    However, the farm my family has in Oregon has a couple gates and perimeter fencing before you get into the area where the barn/horse paddocks are.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,063

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    Most of the perimeter of my property is fenced, my pastures basically surround my barn/house on 3 1/2 sides, with a long gravel driveway that leads to the road. So 95% of my perimeter is fenced, but I don't have a separate perimeter fencing. I'm extremely lucky however, I have woods on 2 sides of my property, another horse property on the 3rd, and our "road" is a private road, we are at the end of a cul-de-sac.

    I am thinking about installing a driveway gate though because random people sometimes drive up the driveway (um really people? It's GRAVEL, and NOT A ROAD) and scare the crap out of me.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

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    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    Yep, the cattle our jerk neighbor doesn't even attempt to keep in are a big part of why our entire property is fenced. He actually puts up barbed wire to detract horses from riding on his property at all, but doesn't bother to connect it into an actual fence, and lets his cattle wander wherever - including a road with a 55mph speed limit. Due to our open range laws, if a cow runs out in front of your car and you're going the speed limit and can't stop, you owe the owner for his cow. It's happened in our area.

    There are also many people who see no need to keep their dogs in despite leash laws here, and several of them formed a pack and were attacking horses.
    That's just crazy. you would think the cow owner would owe you for your totaled car since his cows are not where they belong. it's not like someone was speeding through his cow pasture and hit a cow.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,184

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    you would think the cow owner would owe you for your totaled car since his cows are not where they belong

    Not in those states that still practice range grazing. The state and federal land depts. sell permits to those who want to range graze their cattle, horses, sheep, etc. There are little to no fences because out here it takes 1000s of acres to support just a couple of cattle. Free range grazing is just that FREE RANGE. There are no boundaries unless you put up a fence on your property to keep others OUT. The livestock here take priority so if it consoles anyone as long as your horse is branded or tattooed (and the brand/tattoo is registered with the Dept of Ag) and you carry a permit to range graze and your horse crosses the road and gets hit, again the driver is responsible for the liability.

    My husband gets calls all the time from outsiders who move in and are yelling and pitching a fit because horses just ate their highly cared for lawn or expensive landscaping......well..... depending on where they live those could be (1) feral horses so they're SOL, (2) they could be range grazed ranch horses so they're SOL or (3) they're horses that belong on the reservation and then they're really SOL. You could replace the word, horse with cow, bull, any ole hoofstock and it's the same answer.

    So if you live in unincorporated parts of the counties or in rural towns or are truckin' down the Interstate, the livestock has the right of way. It's the law and it's the way things are done out here in the wild west.
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,664

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    Paddocks are fenced in with some wooden fences but mostly electric fence. That is IT. The outdoor ring has no fence and is right by the road. Fortunately there is a nice stretch of tempting grass next to it, and the one time I was bucked clear off and so could not hang on to my horse, she only went a few yards before stopping to eat. Escapees usually go to fields and pastures, not the road...but as the road is getting busier and busier, I sure hope no horse will end up on it...especially at night.

    Even at the big event barn where I sometimes board, the pastures, and some of the rings are fenced in, but not the driveway / access roads / Xcountry course. Fortunately the facility is on a back road where people drive slowly.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2002
    Location
    Bell, FL
    Posts
    405

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    We have 35 acres completely fenced and gated. More for the dogs than the horses as the horses have never headed for the road, though they have headed for neighbor property that could head for the road. On a bigger farm I could see a money issue, but I would rather pay the money and have everyone safe, than to lose an animal to no fence.
    \"I never play horseshoes \'cause Mother taught us not to throw our clothes around,\" ~ Mr. Ed



  11. #31
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Glenelg, MD
    Posts
    572

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    Our entire farm (16 acres) is *nearly* completely fenced and the driveway has a security gate with key code...I'm hyper paranoid!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
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    2,215

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    Current barn is completely fenced and there is a gate but I said it "stays open" for the purpose of the poll. It is open furring business hours. It is closed at night or when no one is on property. The barn is on a tiny, very bumpy dirt road surrounded by other farms. It's not unheard of for a horse to be found roaming. They usually are caught and returned to their proper home quickly.

    When I was growing up the barn was not fenced but was at the end of a 3/4 mile dirt road with fences on both sided and only one other neighbor. Literally the horses had to go 3/4 of a mile straight to get away from the farm. We all felt really safe and frequently a horse or two would wander loose around the barn yard. One day the herd of ponies got a notion to bolt down the road and make a mad ash for freedom towards the busy road beyond. They got about half way before they got distracted and started grazing but a gate went in within the week and it was always closed.
    The rebel in the grey shirt



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2005
    Location
    Southern California - Hemet
    Posts
    1,578

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    Where I board, the horses are enclosed in separate fenced areas or mare motel stalls and there is a perimeter fence with a gate that is locked when the facility is closed and left open when the facility is doing business. They have been in business a long time and, while the rare escape artist gets out of an improperly closed corral or stall for a nighttime stroll, I do not know of any cases where a loose horse has escaped the perimeter fence.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,263

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    I've never kept a horse where the perimeter was entirely fenced, let alone complete with an always closed gate, and I don't think it's the norm, either. My farm now is mostly fenced, but there's several hundred feet of road frontage that isn't. I'm on a rural road, and the very rare occasional loose horse usually just goes tearing around the hay field or between pastures/paddocks riling up the pasture rats. There are no horses across the road from me, and my horses would very likely balk at pavement, so I don't worry too much about it.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
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    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    We've been on my BO for a while to fence the property, or at least the two sides that run along busy roads. Almost 30 years ago, when she built the barn, the area was quite rural. That is no longer the case. A gate might be overkill, and to be fair, along one road it's partially fenced and where it's not, there's a big hedge, but the corner that is open freaks me out.
    This is exactly our situation at trainer barn, minus the hedge Formerly quiet road, now insane along one edge of the property & no fence. Makes me twitchy.

    My parent's place we have the entire horsie area fenced. The barn & barnyard are enclosed all around, pasture in the back. If they get out of the barn, no place to go.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2005
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    2,795

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    We're up on a hill, connected to a private road to the west. Main road is probably 3/4 mile away, downhill and across a stream.

    Out of hundreds - thousands - of horses that have come and gone from this property, the only one who's ever gone down the hill on the private road is the pony. And he didn't even get to the bottom of the hill.

    The north and south are completely fenced off, with woods, stream and then the private road to the north of the fence, woods on the other side of the south perimeter. The farm runs into a steep hill to the east and is almost entirely fenced, except for a ~15 foot gap which we can block off, where a trail/primitive road up the steep hill begins.
    It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    5,650

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    Quote Originally Posted by exvet View Post
    you would think the cow owner would owe you for your totaled car since his cows are not where they belong

    Not in those states that still practice range grazing. The state and federal land depts. sell permits to those who want to range graze their cattle, horses, sheep, etc. There are little to no fences because out here it takes 1000s of acres to support just a couple of cattle. Free range grazing is just that FREE RANGE. There are no boundaries unless you put up a fence on your property to keep others OUT. The livestock here take priority so if it consoles anyone as long as your horse is branded or tattooed (and the brand/tattoo is registered with the Dept of Ag) and you carry a permit to range graze and your horse crosses the road and gets hit, again the driver is responsible for the liability.

    My husband gets calls all the time from outsiders who move in and are yelling and pitching a fit because horses just ate their highly cared for lawn or expensive landscaping......well..... depending on where they live those could be (1) feral horses so they're SOL, (2) they could be range grazed ranch horses so they're SOL or (3) they're horses that belong on the reservation and then they're really SOL. You could replace the word, horse with cow, bull, any ole hoofstock and it's the same answer.

    So if you live in unincorporated parts of the counties or in rural towns or are truckin' down the Interstate, the livestock has the right of way. It's the law and it's the way things are done out here in the wild west.
    I wanted to give it a thumbs down because I hate it, but yep what she said.

    I think it's ridiculous, and at least the guy here could very easily keep his cattle in but chooses not to, and they regularly do damage to other people's property.

    On the plus side, my horse is terrified of cattle so the cattle hanging out on the other side of the fence while I'm riding has been great training for him!

    There are laws regarding what kind of fencing the rancher will have to replace if the cattle break it down, and ours is beyond what's required, so at least we're protected in that sense...
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2012
    Posts
    342

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    The barn I board at is completely fenced off, with a gate to the barn, although all pastures/paddocks but two border a good stretch of the road.

    The main gate to the barn is more often closed than not. Used to be the mare and filly had full run of the barnyard, so the gate was closed at all times, and controlled closely when a vehicle needed in/out. Now mare & filly do not have full run, and gate still remains shut for most of the time.

    I only ever open it if I am bringing my car or horse thru, or expecting vet/farrier/chiro, etc.

    Emily
    Last edited by Emily&Jake; Nov. 11, 2012 at 02:28 AM. Reason: spelling



  19. #39
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    Jul. 5, 2002
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    http://www.town-and-country.org/
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    in town
    heavily wooded buffer between the road and private horse barn with fenced pasture, entrances and fencing "posted" No trespassing
    more hay, less grain



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2003
    Location
    Southern New Jersey
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    371

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    I believe in the adage that good fences make good neighbors so my two horse properties have been completely fenced with dog proof, woven wire perimeter fencing with locked gates. The huge investment in perimeter fencing for my former 40 acre property came about because of a neighbor with loose, unneutered dogs that liked to fight with my dogs and annoy my horses PLUS my loose, probably unneutered neighbor on his ATV wreaking havoc on my trails and fighting with and annoying me. Fencing him and his dogs out was the only logical option to allow peace on my property.

    Now I live on only 6.5 acres, but it is also perimeter fenced in dog proof, no climb woven wire with locked gates. This way my horses and dogs stay safe from the busy roads that are nearby and safe from any loose dogs or errant teenagers!

    For me, perimeter fencing is a huge priority in a horse property because of my location. If I lived on a signifcantly bigger property than my former 40 acre property, then I understand the cost might be impractical and other options considered. If there is a busy road nearby, at the very least I would want a fence and gate on that side to re-direct a loose horse away from the road.
    Annabelle Mayr, Arcadia Farm
    Home of Fitz, Max, Daeo & Austria
    Now over the Rainbow Bridge: Finn, Jake & Seamus



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