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View Poll Results: Does your horse property have a fence between the horse facilities and any public roa

Voters
171. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes – Property is fenced with a gate at the drive way – gate stays closed.

    72 42.11%
  • Yes – Property is fenced, but driveway gate stays open / no driveway gate.

    57 33.33%
  • No – Property is not fenced from the road.

    42 24.56%
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Results 1 to 20 of 51
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,278

    Default Is the property you keep your horse on fenced?

    Does your horse property have a fence between the horse facilities and any public roads?

    Just curious as to what the “norm” is.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2008
    Location
    Deschapelles, Haiti
    Posts
    2,399

    Default

    I have a very small yard beyond what I no-climb fenced for the animals, but the rest of the house and yard are fenced and I rebuilt the gate. More for the sheep than the pony though.

    All the rest of Deschapelles grazing space though - no chance!
    HAS provides hospital care to 340,000 people in Haiti's Artibonite Valley 24/7/365/earthquake/cholera/whatever.
    www.hashaiti.org blog:http://hashaiti.org/blog



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Yes, my boarding facility has a fence with a gate that is kept closed all the time. It is absolutely necessary though as the facility runs alongside a really busy road with traffic that drives way too fast.
    In fact, just a few weeks ago, a car was going way too fast for the slick road and totally took out a telephone pole right next to our outside arena!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    5,638

    Default

    We've been on my BO for a while to fence the property, or at least the two sides that run along busy roads. Almost 30 years ago, when she built the barn, the area was quite rural. That is no longer the case. A gate might be overkill, and to be fair, along one road it's partially fenced and where it's not, there's a big hedge, but the corner that is open freaks me out.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,670

    Default

    The whole property here is fenced in with two gates. One large enough for trucks to get through, the other is a small one for people. And if any of the boarders, guests, students, etc leave either open there is h**l to pay



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
    Location
    Left coast, left wing, left field
    Posts
    6,356

    Default

    Nope, no fences around the farm where I board. But it is 110 acres and on a VERY quiet road. When horses have gotten out of their stalls/paddocks/pastures, they are inclined to wander DEEPER into the property, looking for grass or buddies.

    I find a hard time imagining a situation in which any one of our horses would be so spooked by something on the farm that they'd make the effort that it would take to get to the road.

    The worst thing around here is when the landlord calls and says "one of your horses is in the Hmong garden". It's a commercial garden i.e. these people's livelihood, growing flowers for grocery stores and produce markets, and we have enough problems with floods and acid soil -- they sure as heck don't need a bad fat horse munching the dahlias!
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,136

    Default

    Yep, there is a fence around the entire farm (former TB breeding farm), and one of the gates is always closed. The other gate stays open, but it is well away from the barn/pastures and is not the direction horses typically choose when they get loose. When I was in Iowa, none of the farms I boarded at had perimeter fencing, but they were also in very remote sections of farm land with no major roads.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Mine is. Obviously a solid perimeter fence to a large property can get expensive, so I think there are some considerations when deciding whether or not it truly is necessary. I think any side of the property with access to a road has to be fenced. Usually horses that get loose go for an initial gallop, and then dance around and head for grass/buddies. You need to be sure that initial dash isn't out into the road. Depending on how your driveway is situated, a gate on the driveway may or may not be necessary. The number of boarders and age/reliability of the horses on the property is another issue. If you have mares and foals or are breaking young stock, I think a perimeter fence is a little more critical.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    1,062

    Default

    My boarding barn is in a public park. The side toward the road is fenced and gated, but the gate is left open during the day. Rangers lock the gate at sunset or when the barn is closed, which is around 8pm during the week. Good thing is that anytime a horse has been loose - they have always gone toward the fields, which are in the back of the property and surrounded by park land, but they never go far. My guy has riled the fields up and then put himself back in his stall.
    Last edited by skykingismybaby1; Nov. 9, 2012 at 07:54 PM. Reason: spelling



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
    Location
    south eastern US
    Posts
    2,521

    Default

    Yes and no. I keep my horses at home, on my own property. My barn is fenced off from the road where you have enter the gate at the end of the drive way and go through another gate to get to it yet some of my pasture fences do border the road.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
    Posts
    3,428

    Default

    Answered for the barn I ride at. Pastures completely surround the perimeter of the property, and the front field with the driveway is a turnout pasture at night. The driveway gate is closed by the last rider to leave in the evening, or the barn owner.
    I'm so paranoid about gates that if I arrive for an early lesson and the gate is still closed, i close it behind me, even though I'm fairly certain the bo has turned in all the horses from that field for the day. I also text her to confirm that i have closed the gate behind me in the evening. The gate can't be seen from the house, and she's had people forget to close it at night which is a huge liability.
    So her property is completely enclosed, but not cross-fenced.

    At our place, we always leave the gate closed to the front yard. Well I should say, MrB sometimes leaves it open even if he's left a dog or two in the backyard (for short trips, like grocery store.). I worry too much not to have all gates closed but that's just me!
    We can see the front gate from the house, and i can't imagine not being able to glance and alleviate my worries of an open gate immediately.
    Now, an electronic gate opener, now that would be lovely.
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,389

    Default

    My arena is fully enclosed complete with a gate. My property is not, and i live on a very quiet road. the last place i boarded featured a barn fenced off from the busy road, and the arena was behind it. You could certainly 'ride out' but lessons and young colts were 'handled' inside a fence, you bet. a horse getting loose 'in the barn' had to jump a 5 foot fence to tangle with cars. It was on a very busy road, no other option would have been wise.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    4,811

    Default

    I've boarded at dozens of farms and worked at even more in various states around the county.

    In my personal experience, perimeter fencing enclosing the entire property is NOT the norm (as it may seem from this thread). Driveway gates are more common than full perimeter fencing, but I would still say more farms don't have them than do. Most properties do not have the barn or horse facilities fully enclosed.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

    Default

    My property is completely fenced, the gate is always closed and at night it's padlocked. We have a pony so we don't take any chances.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2010
    Location
    South-Central PA
    Posts
    86

    Default

    The barn I board at is completely fenced in. There's a gate across the driveway. The last person to leave the barn each night closes and latches the gate. Then whoever gets there first in the morning opens the gates up for the day. It's more to keep any escaping horses in rather than people out since there's no lock for the gate.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,095

    Default

    My farm has a fence/gate across the driveway. Whether it is closed depends on where the horses are. I aim to always have two gates (and fences) between the horses and the road. I live on a very quiet road, but on the other hand if the horses got out down the driveway potentially would be an attractive direction to take.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    Our property has a perimeter fence with a couple of gates which we keep closed actually because of our dogs. Here range grazing is still practiced. It's the land owner's responsibility to fence their acreage/property if they want to keep things out (as opposed to in).
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    I do have trails and woods that you could find your way through to a road, but the road frontage is fenced and there is a fence around the arena.

    One of the reasons I liked this place was it already had a fence and gate on the arena. I'm sure I ride 50% better in an arena with a gate.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    5,009

    Default

    No. I have a fenced arena, but only close the gate if I'm working with horse at liberty inside it. The perimeter of my property isn't fenced. But we live on a dirt road and we're a mile or so from the nearest road with any traffic.

    The barn where I take lessons is similarly situated, with the same set up. Although they do usually close the arena gate when people are inside riding or lunging. Horses have been known to get away from people on occasion. Although they never leave the property - they generally head for whatever paddock their friends are in. They may play keep-away with their disgruntled handler for a bit, but they don't head for the horizon or anything.

    Have any of y'all ever known a horse to get loose and leave all the other horses on the place and flee for parts unknown? Just curious - it seems to me that would be kind of counter to their herd instincts. Although that seems to be what happened with the horse on the other thread.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,844

    Default

    Our perimeter fence is barbed wire with cattleguards at our driveway and the ditch road. The horses are behind smooth wire. Conceivably they could jump the cattleguard but I doubt it
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



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