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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,415

    Default Uveitis game plan update post 11, Lyme too

    Vet, non opthamologist was out and confirmed uveitis. Horse is getting triple antibiotic drops. Guardian mask is being shipped.
    Now what?
    I get that it needs diagnostic tests to figure out if it's viral fungal trauma or autoimmune. I think autoimmune as he also has some breathing difficulties.. He also had a one sided nose bleed years ago and regurgitates water after drinking ( that's new, and by that I mean water pools somewhere and pops out 5 mins after drinking).
    So for treatment there is the implantable antibiotic, aspirin or bute(which may cause stomach ulcers).
    Has anyone had luck with:
    Chinese herbs from ForLoveOfTheHorse guy
    Acupuncture
    Allergy shots (to help if it's autoimmune)
    No more vaccines (autoimmune)
    Bute Or banimine before after worming
    Removal and replacement of eye fluid
    Any off the wall suggestions with food, sugars, supplements
    Last edited by Chall; Nov. 18, 2012 at 03:01 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
    Posts
    327

    Default

    She wears a guardian mask, a kensington mask, and a cashel mask. Other than the guardian mask, the other two brands i use block 70% or so of sunlight. She wears a mask every single day of the year outside except if its pouring.

    Banimine during flare ups and banamine during vacinations. I have not had to use it when worming.

    I have had great sucess with daily MSM 10,000 or 15,000 mg.
    Last edited by ActNatural; Apr. 29, 2013 at 11:36 AM.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,816

    Default

    Ask about daily aspirin protocol. My late app mare was on aspirin every day for it. Also used the guardian mask and Banamine during flare ups. Did find the daily aspirin kept her flare-free for 9 months. Ditto on the MSM too

    Many horses, tho, have done well after the Cyclosporin Implant
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    560

    Default

    I have a retired pony mare with it. The biggest things with her are fly mask for flies, Guardian mask for during flare ups, rinsing her eyes with saline if it was windy and regularly when we are feeding round bales. I also keep the triple antibiotic opthalmic ointment on hand, so as soon as she starts looking the slightest bit "squinty" in goes the ointment. With that protocol, she hasn't had a full flare up in over a year. We didn't do any of the testing since it responds so well to management. Also, forgot to mention she gets banamine also at first sign of squinting or watering and is on daily MSM. She actually gets the MSM to help with arthritis in her back, but it probably helps her eyes too.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,578

    Default

    Have you thought about a cyclosporin implant?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2005
    Posts
    538

    Default

    I have a horse with uveitis, he has cyclosporine implants in both eyes, he got them in 2008. He did have flare ups after the implants, and eventually did have complete retinal detachment in his left eye. He lost the vision in that eye in 2010. After the vision loss we did bute every other day for a long time, just over the last year I have decreased depending on his stress level. At times he gets bute 2-3 times a week. I'm lucky if I can keep a mask on him in turnout:-( but he's been flare free since he lost his vision in that eye.

    I bute or bamanine for worming and vaccinations, and I only give him 1 vaccince at a time, I spread it out over months.

    It's an ugly disease, and it's all about management of inflammation and stress, and knowing when to use the drugs to control it. Of course, bute and banamine bring along other issues, but it comes down to comfort and saving the vision.

    I guess my first suggestion to you is get your horse to a opthamologist, and decide if your horse is a candidate for the cyclosporine implants and/or how to best manage the disease.

    ETA - I tried accupuncture, MSM, Chinese herbs, you name it, I tried it before the implants. Although he did lose his vision in the one eye after the implants, I have no regrets. He was having flare up 2-3x a year, and they would take several weeks to settle down. Often times these horses have flares that we cannot see, and the meds we use cannot get into the back of the eye, this is where the implants help. He's only had two flares after the implants...one was "expected" from the stress of surgery, then the one major where it started as a scratch and we were not aggressive enough with the meds, and he lost his vision.

    Best wishes to you.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    2,067

    Default

    I've had two with it, neither was an appaloosa (fwiw) and both seemed to be immune-related, though testing wasn't even an option back then. The thing that seemed to make the most difference was keeping them as healthy as absolutely possible. Really good feed, good management for breathing problems, stress management, etc. My mare had all her vaccines split up and spread out; the gelding, I think we just limited him to the minimum possible. Anything that could potentially tweak their immune systems made me extra vigilant. With my mare, I could tell when I drove into the driveway if her eyes were bothering her because she'd rub her eye on her knee and leave a wet spot. The gelding wore a mask most of the time but I could tell from his posture - he looked like he had a headache.

    Neither got anything daily in terms of prevention. The gelding did get ulcery from the banamine and bute, so we had to switch him to previcox, which was just ok for pain management for his eye but was great for his arthritis, so we kept him on that for his arthritis and I think it probably helped the eye somewhat, too. My mare wouldn't eat aspirin and that was the thing to do back then, so she just lived as healthy of a life as possible. I had her in my back yard for the last several years of her life, and that was great for both of us - I could address a problem immediately and it wasn't a big deal to go out in my jammies at bedtime for more ointment. The gelding was boarded and still survived. I made quite a few trips to the barn before work but it just wasn't possible to do things as well or as often as ideal.

    When I read other people's stories I feel like we got off easy. Both had limited flare ups which were pretty manageable overall. No trips to the vet school, no expensive treatments (really, banamine paste was the most expensive thing either of them ever got), and both behaved well for having their eyes cared for even when it really hurt. I learned to stain eyes, I learned to really watch my horse closely, I learned to put stuff in horses' eyes by myself without help or even a halter. Here's hoping your horse isn't any worse than that!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2011
    Posts
    424

    Default

    i have a 19 year old pony with it. she is currently having a flare up and all the meds in the world do not seem to be helping. i asked my vet about the implants but havent really looked into the whole process.

    what is the process? how much does it cost? where is it done? do the implants stay in forever?

    this pony was dumped on me by a "friend" (no longer). she gets around really well, even with limited sight. she had it when she originally came here. right now she is being tested for cushings.

    thanks for the info!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2005
    Posts
    538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bastile View Post
    i have a 19 year old pony with it. she is currently having a flare up and all the meds in the world do not seem to be helping. i asked my vet about the implants but havent really looked into the whole process.

    what is the process? how much does it cost? where is it done? do the implants stay in forever?

    this pony was dumped on me by a "friend" (no longer). she gets around really well, even with limited sight. she had it when she originally came here. right now she is being tested for cushings.

    thanks for the info!
    When I had it done in 2008, for both eyes, I think my total bill was around $3000-$3500. The implant looks like an M&M and it is placed into the scalera (sp?), which is in the back of the eye.

    The implant is a slow release of the drug, cyclosporine, and they stay in forever, but the drug does not last forever.

    My horse was part of the study as they were not approved, and they are to last anywhere 3-5 years, and then the horse can go through the surgery again to have another implant. Some horses in the study at the time had the implants for 5-8 years and the horses never needed another one b/c they horse was not experiencing flare ups. My horse will not go through the surgery again only b/c of other immune issues, some lameness issues he's had, and I think the stress will be too much if I consider cost and his long term use/soundness.

    Note, the implants are not a cure, they are only another option to help control the disease. And there is no guarantee the implants will prevent future flare up, they are meant to reduce the number of flares...and as noted, some horses in the study never had a flare up after 5-8 years with the implants.

    I had my horse done at OSU - highly recommend their staff and doctors.

    Note - My horse it a TB, so not a Appy either.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
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    2,524

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut Run View Post
    Also, forgot to mention she gets banamine also at first sign of squinting or watering and is on daily MSM.
    Sheila
    I manage an elderly mare with uveitis, and it has been quite a learning experience! Mostly using triple antibiotic ointment, fly/guardian masks, daily eye cleaning, and banamine when needed. The single most helpful advice from my vet is at the first hint of squinting, to get her on banamine immediately.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,415

    Default

    K.
    Vet returned for deeper exam. Flushed eyes via nostrils. The good eye flushed, the bad eye was blocked, saline would not go up and out eye.
    He has reduced menace response, but eye is getting harder (apparently UV effected eye is physically softer than a good eye).
    Vet snap tested for Lyme and horse had very positive response, so is on medication for that. So triple antibiotics for eye, banamine, probiotics, and tls (??) for Lyme tick. She gave him acupuncture with a needle filled with his own blood around they eye. She didn't comment on cyclosporine implants and she did not recommend Aspirin because it's half life was so small in horses.
    The guardian mask does not fit this Arabs head, his head is too big for the small size. He has a distinguished nose and the slightest dish - has been mistaken for a Lippinzer.
    Oh and vet said he was fat :/
    So.. I'm reading up on Lyme and UV connections..



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    Hunt Country Heaven, VA
    Posts
    630

    Default

    I have no experience with Uveitis in horses, however I have been in the human ophthalmology world for seven years. I also have recently had to treat my Beagle for uveitis secondary to Lyme.

    In treating both humans and my dog, topical medication in the form of prednisolone and homatropine drops make a huge difference in a matter of 24 hours. The prednisolone is a steriodal based med and the homatropine keeps the eye dilated for comfort. Humans that have Uveitis seem to get flare ups from time to time and any patient at our practice typically goes back on the drops for 7-10 days. The down side to treating with prednisolone is the chance that steriodal induced glaucoma may occur.

    Is equine Uveitis not treated the same way? Has anyone used these drops at all as part of their equine Uveitis treatment?
    Lost in the Land of the Know It Alls



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