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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2006
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    Question Broodmares age and breeding every year?

    I have a big decision to make next year!

    I was planning to sell my 4 year old, but i am having so much fun jumping him, I may just keep him for my derby horse.

    So that leaves me to my broodmare. She is in foal to a beautiful welsh stallion and I have to decide if I will not breed her next year or find a younger stallion that is looking for "test" mares to see what they produce to save a little up front money. I have room at my house for another one, but I don't have a huge chunk of change to pay out.

    I know the young stallions are a gamble, but all the hunter stallions I like are over 1800 to breed to. The one I really want to breed to is 2000 euros!

    Here is my worry about not breeding her, she will be 13 next year and I know the older she gets the harder she will be to get in foal.

    Will waiting until she is 14 be too big of a gamble? She took first try off a foal heat this year and last year after having 4 years off it took 3 times!

    I have also thought about offering her to a few people I know that have good programs to lease for a broodmare and I would keep her on my farm.

    She is an amazing mare. Her 2 colts by Roc USA are both great, the one this year won the Oldenburg inspection and the 4 year old is looking to be a perfect derby horse. She moves phenomenal and is a great mother, stays healthy even nursing and loves the mom life!

    So what are your thoughts? I have until April to decide, it is just becoming a harder decision then I thought!



  2. #2
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    Sep. 22, 2012
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    I don't see any issue with either options.

    If you go with a young up n' coming stallion, really do your research. Proof is always in the pudding, even if there isn't much pudding to sample.

    There's always the option of looking at stallions who may be campaigned primarily in Dressage, but have the skills necessary to produce a hunter (Sir Gregory comes to mind, IMO) that doesn't come with the Hunter price tag.

    That being said.. 14 isn't particularly "old" for a broodmare. Pull her out of the field, do a breeding exam, flush her, etc and you'll likely still be fine



  3. #3
    Samotis is offline Grand Prix Premium Member
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    Default

    Any other opinions?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2001
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    NW Louisiana
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    I agree, leave her open. I think old for a broodmare is in their late teens. Both of my girls one is 10 & one is 9, are not in foal this year, not to lack of trying, and they were at two different farms in two different parts of the state and had foals by their side so you just never know how hard is can be to breed from year to year no matter what their age. Everyone was saying is was the drought conditions that was giving us the hard to breed last two years. Mother nature knows best



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
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    Mirabel, QC
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    Default

    I did just that this year, my mare never had any issues getting in foal, but she seemed quite drained and frankly, so was my pocketbook. Thus, a year off. She is 14 years old this year.

    As far as next year? I don't know yet. It'll depend if I find a steal of a deal on a stud fee or if I get a serious chunk of change in (ie. a big contract, I am self-employed).

    I try not to worry too much about it... and next time, I'll aim for an early foal so at least I'll have some time to figure out any issues if need be. I hope!

    Edited to add: Mine has her 7th foal at side this year.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
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  6. #6
    Samotis is offline Grand Prix Premium Member
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    She will be having her 3rd foal next year. This years colt was huge and stayed with her until 7 months and she was happy and healthy looking, so I don't think that the foals are hurting her at all.

    It's either take care of a baby or put up with her older son, so I will just have to wait until its closer to see if I have the money to breed her again.

    Things can change a lot in 6 months.

    Only good thing about not breeding is that I can put her under lights and breed her earlier in 2014.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 20, 2009
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    If it were me...I would make a short list of established stallions I like and why. Then I would start investigating possible untried stallions who might exhibit similar qualities. IF I found one that knocked my socks off, I'd breed. If not, well at least it was fun looking.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
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    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
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    You could also try the breeding auctions. Don't most of the US registries have them somewhere around Feb/March? I think the fees are really reduced unless there's a bidding war on the more popular stallions. Might be an option for keeping fees down but still getting to a nice, proven stallion.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Ditto - I would also suggest the stallion auctions. I paid $250 in the 2nd chance auction of the BWP. Picked up a stud fee on a horse that normally goes for $1500. He's perhaps a little "out of style" hence the lack of bids but still a SOLID producing horse. Consider seeing who's available in the auctions and you can get a real bargain there. Just make sure to read the fine print. One stallion owner regularly adds a $500 "booking fee" to the stud services she donates to the auctions.... Not such a good deal that way.
    The rebel in the grey shirt



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