The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 53
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2009
    Posts
    93

    Default I can't vote! :-(

    As a US resident, a permanent one mind you, but not a citizen, I'm not allowed to vote. But they certainly want me to pay my taxes on time!
    I think after so many years in this country, I should be allowed to vote


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2008
    Location
    Half past the point of oblivion
    Posts
    924

    Default

    If you want a say in our democratic process, become a citizen. You are utilizing things taxes pay for (roads, police, emergency, infrastructure, etc) so it is only right that you pay taxes as a permanent resident.
    Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian


    12 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,243

    Default

    I guess my first question is "If you have been here for so many years, why haven't you become a citizen?" I'm honestly curious as to what your reason is, not being snarky.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    My husband is a permanent resident as well (he is German and has a green card). He is not yet eligible to apply for US citizenship (hasn't been a green card holder long enough), but he is still undecided as to whether he will when the time comes. There are a lot of things to consider when you do this.

    First, the US respects dual citizenship laws based on the citizenship laws of the other country. Germany only honors dual citizenship in cases of extreme hardship, so for my husband to become a US citizen, he would first need to renounce his German citizenship. Extreme hardship is considered to be something like renouncing your citizenship would put you in danger, or if your country doesn't allow you to renounce your citizenship.

    Further, when we have children, we'd like our kids to be able to use their German "half" to their advantage if they want to in the future. Germany was a fantastic place for my husband to grow up, and he had fantastic opportunities there as a child and young adult. While he considers voting in the US a very important duty, he still feels like his ties to his home country are strong, and is unsure that denying his future kids the right to such opportunity in Germany are an equal trade.

    You'd be surprised at how many people think my husband's green card came in the mail automatically when we got married, and how many people think he's automatically a dual citizen of the US and Germany just because he's married to a US citizen.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,172

    Default

    I am not touching this one with a ten foot pole.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,479

    Default

    FFtEH, how long after you got married did it take to get the green card? Facing something similar myself.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Posts
    2,352

    Default

    You're not a citizen and can't vote. So?


    10 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Dry Ridge, KY USA
    Posts
    3,099

    Default

    I guess that my question is, if you are a "US resident, who pays their taxes on time (thank you for doing that! )", then why have you not become a citizen? Voting is a right for the citizens of this country. Become a citizen and let your voice be heard.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!


    9 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2006
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    2,338

    Default

    It is the difference between owning a house and renting. You can't change a house you rent-structurally, but if you own it, have at it.

    French Fry, I understand your dh's point of view. Citizenship is not something to lightly cast away or take up.
    http://community.webshots.com/album/548368465RfewoU[/url]

    She may not have changed the stars from their courses, but she loved a good man, and she rode good horses….author unknown


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by axl View Post
    If you want a say in our democratic process, become a citizen. You are utilizing things taxes pay for (roads, police, emergency, infrastructure, etc) so it is only right that you pay taxes as a permanent resident.
    This. Don't complain about having to pay taxes as a non-citizen when you're benefitting from those services and structures that your taxes help pay for.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    7 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gnalli View Post
    It is the difference between owning a house and renting. You can't change a house you rent-structurally, but if you own it, have at it.

    French Fry, I understand your dh's point of view. Citizenship is not something to lightly cast away or take up.
    Right.
    Took me ten years to decide, before I became a citizen.
    Now I can vote.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post
    FFtEH, how long after you got married did it take to get the green card? Facing something similar myself.
    Totally depends on how quickly you want to get the green card and how badly you need it. You also need to be sure that you will qualify as a sponsor for your spouse (sponsors are required to prove that they earn 1.5x the poverty level annually for ___ years). If you don't qualify as a sponsor, an immediate family member can sign as a sponsor and provide tax information to prove their eligibility. Once you file, your spouse cannot travel outside of the US until the application is process unless they file for permission (expensive).

    My husband had a visa through his employer, so it wasn't critical that we processed his green card application immediately. We were kind of lazy about it. But you can do it immediately after you get married. Application submission to green card receipt took about 9 months in my husband's case, if I recall correctly. We went in for one interview, which was a little weird. We had to bring our wedding album, photos of our relationship, our house keys (which they compared), and were asked questions about how we arrived at the interview that day.

    The entire process was not cheap- it cost us a little more than $2000 and will cost another couple hundred when he files for his "permanent" card this year (the first card you get is "temporary").

    Depending on the country your spouse is filing from, you may want to seek the counsel of an immigration attorney. We consulted with one, but she said we shouldn't need her services. I will say, the paperwork is DAUNTING, and if you need any kind of assistance figuring out what the jargon actually MEANS, the USCIS will be absolutely no help whatsoever. They will simply re-read their exact verbage to you word for word.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,574

    Default

    Then in the words of that great Southern Philosopher, Larry the Cable Guy: Git-R-Dun! Study, take that test and be sworn in.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2007
    Posts
    333

    Default not meant snarky

    Options:
    1. Go Home
    2. Become a Citizen
    3. Quit whining


    8 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,323

    Default

    Digit: Go through the long, expensive process of citizenship if you want to vote. If I moved to another country, I would have to pay taxes there, pay taxes to the US, and I would not be allowed to vote. (In some I wouldn't be allowed to even try becoming a citizen if I couldn't prove ancestry, either.) The US is pretty generous about who they allow to become a citizen.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by axl View Post
    If you want a say in our democratic process, become a citizen. You are utilizing things taxes pay for (roads, police, emergency, infrastructure, etc) so it is only right that you pay taxes as a permanent resident.
    Permanent residents pay all the taxes that US citizens do, and sometimes MORE.
    Last edited by Janet; Nov. 6, 2012 at 10:29 AM. Reason: typo
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Permanent residents pay all the taxes that US citizens do, and sometimes MORE.
    So what? If I moved to the UK (for example) I'd have to pay taxes there, and I'd have to pay taxes HERE.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    ... If I moved to another country, I would have to pay taxes there, pay taxes to the US, and I would not be allowed to vote.
    That is just plain NOT TRUE.

    If you were a resident in the United Kingdom, you COULD vote in UK elections, whether you were a citizen or not.

    And British citizens/subjects, who are not recently resident inthe UK, can NOT vote in UK elections.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2007
    Location
    Tampa FL
    Posts
    663

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by axl View Post
    If you want a say in our democratic process, become a citizen.
    Like you just have to decide to become a US citizen...

    I lived and worked (hard) in the US 7 years and never even got a chance to start a greencard process, let alone a citizenship. I didn't study long enough, my greencard process was going to take 8 years (not to mention that it costs 12K nowadays if you use a lawyer which you have to do because paperwork is just impossible to fill in by yourself and you get very little chance of being approved if you do)

    But I did see people win the greencard lottery, move to Los Angeles only to spend the little money they had trying to make it as actors and go back home as they ran out of money after 6 months... That pissed me off so much, but I continue to play the lottery of course, hoping that my turn will come and that this country will let me come back and pay my taxes as I've always done. Now I'm playing from France as I haven't found a way to return to the US yet. Ironically, my 2 year old son is American as he was born in CA. Everybody tells me "it should be easy to get your greencard then"; oh sure, he can help me get my greencard.... when he turns 18! Talk about stupid immigration laws...

    I too wish I could vote, but it won't happen anytime soon... to compensate, I did get involved in the campaign a lot. I hope you did too Digit!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    So what? If I moved to the UK (for example) I'd have to pay taxes there, and I'd have to pay taxes HERE.
    Not really. As a US citizen (or resident) you get a US deduction for your UK taxes which usually results in paying no US taxes.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jun. 28, 2012, 09:41 AM
  2. I don't vote...
    By fordtraktor in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Nov. 2, 2010, 10:52 AM
  3. DON'T Vote for me!!!!
    By Ted the Peep 'Ho in forum Off Course
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jul. 9, 2010, 12:05 PM
  4. Vote for me!!
    By farmgirl88 in forum Off Course
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Feb. 18, 2010, 06:57 PM
  5. VOTE VOTE VOTE
    By obie in forum Off Course
    Replies: 136
    Last Post: Nov. 3, 2004, 05:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •