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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2010
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Keep in mind the floor plan of my trailer too. It's a 4H GN frame that was custom built into a 2H. It's really big compared to a "normal" 2H GN. We had to have it weighed to get it registered so I know the 5,500 is an accurate weight. I'd rather have a heavy trailer than a light one with the type of hauling we do. I hate feeling a trailer sway when a semi passes.

    Comparing the weight of my 2H to the weight of a standard 2H isn't comparing apples to apples.

    Edit to add:
    http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i2...rFloorplan.jpg
    Last edited by countrygal; Nov. 7, 2012 at 01:27 PM. Reason: clarification



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 1999
    Location
    Just Enough Farm, GA
    Posts
    2,229

    Default

    I have a 2 horse straight load XXL Hawk and I pull it with my Tundra. I believe I recall that the trailer has a dry weight of 3200 lbs. I love the trailer and horses seem to love it too. I have a ramp over full doors.

    The Tundra handles one and even two horses, but you know it's back there. If I had a 350 at my disposal I'd be using it to haul on anything other than short trips.

    A friend just bought a Merhow, 2h straight load GN that I really liked as well. Same feel as the Hawk but with some clever, well-thought features that would be really handy.

    Good luck in your trailer shopping!
    If you believe everything you read, better not read. -- Japanese Proverb




  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2012
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Gooseneck Turnbow, 2 horse, slant with a ramp. I'm still in love 6 years later. Mine was built so horses can ride forward or backward and although I've schooled mine to load both ways I've never actually hauled them backward facing.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2011
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Late to weigh in again but I will add that my FL 2H SL GN towed with my Tundra is very stable on the road. No sway when tractor trailers pass. Even DH who whined a lot about driving it to Florida had to admit that the rig is very stable and handles well.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Location
    Down on the Farm
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    I love my custom Hawk GN...it has a rear ramp, plus 5 ft side ramp plus dressing room. I also had floor to ceiling stud removable stud gates that I can use to make two large box stalls. My former trailer was a 4 horse Exiss, it had some structural issues that were not uncommen for the size.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hansiska View Post
    Do a search on here for Sundowners. Many had big problems with floors. I would stay away from them. Even if you find one with a good floor, I think the reputation issue would hurt resale.
    The top of the line Sundowners do not have prolems with the floors.

    That was a problem in the cheaper model.

    I had a 4 H slant for 18 years and pulled it over 300,000 miles. That is my guess based on the kinds of trips, the regular routes and the several trucks.

    Now what is interesting is that I traded it for a 4 H head to head which I pull with a 2012 F350.

    The computer on the 2012 keeps track of how many miles the trailer is hooked to it.

    Since the end of April, I put 17,000 plus on the truck and the computer ays the trailer was hooked to it for just a few less than 10,000 miles.



    The one I hve now is built like a tank.

    I am not getting into any triler war.

    All I am saying is that if you get a good chance at a top[ of the line Sundowner, you will not be sorry.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Posts
    4,914

    Default

    i have a hawk gooseneck and i love it. ordered for me in summer of 2002 and arrived that fall. so it's now ten years old and in fabulous condition, and i don't do a thig to it ever besides clean it out.
    it's a wide open stock style, 20' on the floor for horses plus a 4' dressing room. the horse space can be made into 4 short straight stalls or two big boxes.
    when i built it i had a pair of haflingers i was hoping to drive, so the trailer was designed to haul them plus the carriage. turns out i prefer trail riding and camping and the trailer easily hauls three full size horses, and i've always had a one ton 350 diesel to pull it with.


    plus this rig is the nicest to camp with, even without living quarters.
    once i unload the horses i sweep out the horse space, lay down a tarp and arrange hay bales on top. my bed goes on six hay bales and i make tables from the rest. the entire interior is then covered with mosquito netting i hang from the ceiling.
    i can sleep in there with all windows and ramps open if i wish and have plenty of comfortable, bug free room to move around in my make shift bedroom.
    happy trails!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    I want to caution every one who purchases a new trailer to make the manufacturer provide more clearance between the gooseneck and the bed rails.

    Even if you pull it with an older truck now, you will trade up someday.

    The new trucks on 21" wheels are 2-1/2" higher resulting in that much less clearance.

    That does not sound like much but I can tell you that it is enough to ruin your truck bed unless you drive it only on improved roads and never park it or turn it around on anything less than a first class level area.

    Ask me how I know.

    Yesterday I crunched my bed on the right side turning a corner on a farm road. I did not drop the trailer wheels in a ditch. The road simply was not level at that corner. As I rounded the corner, the truck moved to a level area while the trailer wheels were on the unleveled area, so crunch.

    Now this is hard to swallow.

    After that, I got home late last night. I have always unloaded my hounds at the kennel and them backed the trailer to a wide level turnaround area and unhitch there,

    There is a large sloping hill on the right side.

    You guessed it. In the dark, I let the right wheels of the trailer get on the slope and crunched the other side of the bed.

    The left side looks like a telephone pole fell on it.

    A Six month old 2012 F250 that listed for over $65,000 with a totally ruined bed.

    I have backed the trailer into that position man times, every single time I have used it.

    Stupid.

    This week, I am going to get some solar lights like people put on their walkways and line them up along the edge of that slope so that I never do that again.

    However, there are still a lot of farm roads....

    Just remember whether you hunt or show, you will be asked to park on unleveled ground.

    Make the trailer manufacturer give you at least four more inches of clearance.

    If that is going to give you claustrophobia in your forward tack or sleeping area, get a 7'6" trailer and you will never miss the 4".

    I just spent a total of $5,000 on it because of a deer collision, so I am not very pleased this morning.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    I want to caution every one who purchases a new trailer to make the manufacturer provide more clearance between the gooseneck and the bed rails.

    Even if you pull it with an older truck now, you will trade up someday.

    The new trucks on 21" wheels are 2-1/2" higher resulting in that much less clearance.

    That does not sound like much but I can tell you that it is enough to ruin your truck bed unless you drive it only on improved roads and never park it or turn it around on anything less than a first class level area.

    Ask me how I know.

    Yesterday I crunched my bed on the right side turning a corner on a farm road. I did not drop the trailer wheels in a ditch. The road simply was not level at that corner. As I rounded the corner, the truck moved to a level area while the trailer wheels were on the unleveled area, so crunch.

    Now this is hard to swallow.

    After that, I got home late last night. I have always unloaded my hounds at the kennel and them backed the trailer to a wide level turnaround area and unhitch there,

    There is a large sloping hill on the right side.

    You guessed it. In the dark, I let the right wheels of the trailer get on the slope and crunched the other side of the bed.

    The left side looks like a telephone pole fell on it.

    A Six month old 2012 F250 that listed for over $65,000 with a totally ruined bed.

    I have backed the trailer into that position man times, every single time I have used it.

    Stupid.

    This week, I am going to get some solar lights like people put on their walkways and line them up along the edge of that slope so that I never do that again.

    However, there are still a lot of farm roads....

    Just remember whether you hunt or show, you will be asked to park on unleveled ground.

    Make the trailer manufacturer give you at least four more inches of clearance.

    If that is going to give you claustrophobia in your forward tack or sleeping area, get a 7'6" trailer and you will never miss the 4".

    I just spent a total of $5,000 on it because of a deer collision, so I am not very pleased this morning.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Pardon the duplicate.

    I tried to edit/delete but it will not take for some reason.

    I despise this new format.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
    Posts
    2,452

    Default

    I love my Shadow 2+1 with living quarters. It's wonderful. Friend has same trailer without living quarters & has pulled to dressage HOY honors for the past 3 years. Has probably 100,000 miles on her Shadow trailer & has had NO problems with it at all. Horses travel great in the box or stalls. 100% insulated including ceiling. I love hauling in boxes & using ramps so it just depends on what you like. I'd definately go for at least 7'6" height though. Let us know what you end up with.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,701

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post

    Aluminum is not as strong as steel but is dramatically less expensive and time consuming to maintain. AL will have a modest gross weight advantage.

    G.
    Actually depends upon grade of aluminum used and how it is assembled as some grades such as 6061-T are about twice as strong as the same gauge steel.... biggest issue as in the assembly process as the aluminum requires more precession in the assembly process ... you just cannot burn two pieces together, grind the weld and call it done.

    Typically, after welding the aluminum pieces together, the strength properties near the weld experience loss of strength of around 80%. The material can be re-heat-treated to restore -T4 or -T6 temper for the whole piece..My thoughts are few if any of the horse trailer manufacturers would go to the added expense of re-heat treating an assembly... just asked the manufacturer if the retreat eh assemblies after welding



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,516

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by countrygal View Post
    This is the exact trailer that I want, only I prefer (and so do my horses) a step-up instead of a ramp.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2010
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    This is the exact trailer that I want, only I prefer (and so do my horses) a step-up instead of a ramp.
    Risa at Happy Trails built this trailer custom. She's amazing to work with! I can't imagine the trailer being any more perfect for what we want. The horse adores it too . Only thing we added when we bought it from the original owner was a 2nd spare. I drooled over this trailer for months before hubby put in an offer.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,701

    Default

    cssutton, thanks for the tip about the extra height for the gooseneck. I apologize to the OP for jumping in on the original thread. I'm shopping for my first trailer now, and was leaning toward a GN for the stability. But our truck (older Dodge 2500) is really tall (no lift kit, it's just tall) and now I have something new to worry about



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