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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshfield View Post
    At 22 I worked in the equine industry an intern in farm management for a university. I made a whopping 15k per year. But, I still budgeted and paid for my owner private insurance at $160 per month because I recognized the necessity of having health insurance. Sine this was in 1999, $250 per month for an indiviudal policy seems reasonable. Having my own policy was vital since I later needed knee surgery the same year.

    I don't know the answer for the auto insurance. When I was in an accident ddicent a few years ago, the hopsital billed my insurance (auto) directly. More recently, the bills were submitted to my health insurance and then forwarded to my auto insurance
    1. I DO NOT HAVE AN EXTRA $250 to spend! If I had it, I would!
    2. I would not have been able to come up with the high deductible associated with the $250 (cheapest) plan anyway, negating the point
    3. AGAIN: no specialist would accept third party billing. I had more than enough coverage on my policy to pay for the ER visit, CT scan, consult, and most of the surgery. That's why I bought it, because I assumed it you know, could be USED in a catastrophic situation like this.

    Quote Originally Posted by horsefaerie View Post
    I have a few Canadian friends who have come to the US for medical procedures or testing because the wait time in Canada was at least 10 months to a year. It can't be THAT great.

    I don't think they should be able to take your home and car and basic needs due to health care costs. Catastrophic costs. Too much stress.

    I also don't think someone who buys a $2500 flat screen TV and always has the latest phone needs anyone to pay their health care. It is a choice.

    And OP you did do something wrong. YOU didn't make health care a priority. You made where you work and what you do a priority. Great choice, really, unless you get hurt. I must be crazy because I worked TWO jobs and went to school FULL time. #%**@ing crazy would have been NOT having health care.

    Honestly, I could feel more empathy had you said "Wow! I screwed up! I should have made it a priority but didn't and look at the mess I am in! Can you help?" I would have suggested you get a paypal account to which we could donate.
    I own a small, 6 year old television, and a two year old phone that was subsidized under my phone plan. I live extremely modestly as I've already said. I don't take vacations, rarely go out to eat, the only clothes I ever buy are from Ross or Marshalls and bought once in a great while, never on a whim. I'm also paying my own tuition (I'm ineligible for FAFSA because my parents refused to fill out the tax information) How the hell am I supposed to come up with an extra $250 when I am gainfully employed, let alone was laid off??? How?? This is so not logical it's not even funny. I don't want free healthcare, let alone your freaking charity because it's all my fault I don't have health insurance. Yeah, I prioritized being a gainfully employed, self sufficient adult. Apparently that means I'm an idiot. You disgust me.

    My mind is blown right now.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by horsefaerie View Post
    I have a few Canadian friends who have come to the US for medical procedures or testing because the wait time in Canada was at least 10 months to a year. It can't be THAT great.
    I'm Canadian and I recently moved to the US. Our system is not perfect and yes some tests do have long wait times, but the entire health care system in Canada works on triage. If you have a life threatening illness or injury, you go to the front of the line, you have a minor ortho issue, well you get to take a number. Does it suck for people who have a bad knee and have to wait for months to get an MRI, you bet, been there done that, but when they thought I might have cancer I was in getting every test under the sun within DAYS. My mom had a liver transplant almost 20 years ago, she was in hospital for 3 months with complications, it didn't cost us anything, we didn't have to sell our house or car or declare bankruptcy to pay for it, all we worried about was taking care of my mom. So no, our system isn't perfect but it's available to everyone and people don't lose everything they've worked for when they or their family members have a medical issue.
    Freedom is the ability not to care what the other person thinks...

    Got air?! Member of the Asthmatic Riders Clique


    10 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by FalseImpression View Post
    You make me laugh when you keep saying you know x Canadians who are not so happy with our system.... but I bet you'd be pretty happy to have it too instead of paying $1000+ every month to an insurance co.

    And, right now, I am in the hospital every day for radiation treatment and one of the usual conversations in the waiting room is how lucky we all are to have our system and not the added stress of paying premiums, risk losing our houses, etc. As many Canadians have said, when it is an emergency, you get the care you need.
    If you complain about pain in your knee but keep playing hockey or ski, well, I guess you can wait...
    I sure would not trade our system for yours. I am glad you are happy paying so much to insurance cos.
    My canadian friends and family members never complain about their healthcare system. Of course the american way is to stick our fingers in our ears and go "La la la ls...we do it better, that's socialism, me me me, la la la la!"


    10 members found this post helpful.

  4. #84
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    Dec. 14, 2007
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    It is insurance that is the problem in the US. Insurance companies don't want to pay for anything, that is why the OP has her problem. This accident was insured by the other motorist.

    I would like to see there be universal healthcare in the US, as there is in Europe, sans litigation. This would be the cheapest way to go. Yes, our taxes would pay for it. Paying privately for for profit insurers and providers is less cost effective and turns health care into an elitist luxury.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  5. #85
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    Mar. 23, 2005
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    SF Bay Area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazednconfused View Post
    (I'm ineligible for FAFSA because my parents refused to fill out the tax information)
    Since you're 24, you should now be able to apply as an independent adult (unless one of your parents is claiming you as a dependent, which, given that you seem to be self-sufficient, seems unlikely.)


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #86
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    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazednconfused View Post
    1. I DO NOT HAVE AN EXTRA $250 to spend! If I had it, I would!
    Until we become Canada and healthcare is "free" for everyone, "affording health insurance" needs to be on the priority list right next to "eating". Stop thinking of it as optional. It's not. If you cannot afford the premium on your current salary, maybe it's time to start looking for something different? Many of the "big box" stores offer health insurance to employees at a much lower premium than you would find buying independent coverage.

    I work for the government (I'm 25, been here 5 years, no degree under my belt, so don't tell me it can't be done) and pay less than $100/mo to cover myself and my husband.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
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    Sep. 22, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by canadianbacon View Post
    I'm Canadian and I recently moved to the US. Our system is not perfect and yes some tests do have long wait times, but the entire health care system in Canada works on triage. If you have a life threatening illness or injury, you go to the front of the line, you have a minor ortho issue, well you get to take a number. Does it suck for people who have a bad knee and have to wait for months to get an MRI, you bet, been there done that, but when they thought I might have cancer I was in getting every test under the sun within DAYS. My mom had a liver transplant almost 20 years ago, she was in hospital for 3 months with complications, it didn't cost us anything, we didn't have to sell our house or car or declare bankruptcy to pay for it, all we worried about was taking care of my mom. So no, our system isn't perfect but it's available to everyone and people don't lose everything they've worked for when they or their family members have a medical issue.
    Yup. I've thought about moving to the US in the future, but I don't think I could deal with it. It is insane to me that someone could go 3 weeks without getting a broken bone fixed because of a lack of healthcare.

    Of course, I'm from the home of medicare (we've had it since 1946) - we really love Tommy Douglas out here in the prairies. It's been around here for over 50 years, and I'd say the majority are pretty happy with it.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88

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    Even if you HAVE health insurance, don't assume that your health insurance will pay for what the doctors deem are necessary tests. I was bucked off my horse a couple of years ago (on a weekend, of course) and was experiencing pain in my chest. Since my only options on a Sunday morning were to go to an emergency room or an urgent care center, I choose the urgent care center, thinking it would be less expensive.

    The doctors took xrays and blood tests and strongly recommended a MRI to make certain that there were no internal injuries. The MRI cost about $1200, which my medical insurance flat out refused to pay. So, despite the fact I had medical coverage, I had to pay a $500 co-pay because I had gone to an emergency room (and where else do you go on a Sunday morning for emergency care) PLUS THE ENTIRE COST OF THE MRI that the doctors insisted that I needed.

    The urgent care facility was only interested in maximizing their fees. Since insurance didn't cover it, I had to pay the cost out of pocket.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
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    Jan. 20, 2007
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    Northern Kentucky
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    I don't see that this is issue is about Obamacarea at all.
    The problem is the doctors who won't treat her, even with assurance that they will get paid (she has insurance that will cover the accident). What the hell is wrong with them?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabaret SK View Post
    Yup. I've thought about moving to the US in the future, but I don't think I could deal with it. It is insane to me that someone could go 3 weeks without getting a broken bone fixed because of a lack of healthcare.

    Of course, I'm from the home of medicare (we've had it since 1946) - we really love Tommy Douglas out here in the prairies. It's been around here for over 50 years, and I'd say the majority are pretty happy with it.
    I told my husband that healthcare was a non-negotiable must in order for me to move here. I'm with you, I just can't wrap my head around not being able to get the care you need, especially with something like a broken wrist!
    Freedom is the ability not to care what the other person thinks...

    Got air?! Member of the Asthmatic Riders Clique


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Jun. 4, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time Rider View Post
    Even if you HAVE health insurance, don't assume that your health insurance will pay for what the doctors deem are necessary tests.
    Good point. In my situation I had had IBS symptoms for years, nothing I tried (meds) that the doctor gave me worked and I finally point blank asked my doctor is I could be tested for Celiac Disease since it seemed like a logical thing to look for given my history. He said that the insurance would never allow it or pay for it as "I wasn't sick enough." Ummm not sick enough...nearly every day down in bed with cramps and bloating and abject misery...affecting my life and my ability to function at all.

    Anyone who is familiar with this autoimmune disease knows that it can lead to much worse complications like Chrons Disease, Lupus, Diabetes, Colitis, etc...so one stupid test could alert doctors to a person that is susceptible to all these major health issues before they get them and be able to manage it, yet they would not pay unless you were already sick with one...that logic made no sense to me.

    So I was able to find a place that would do the test and I paid for it..$200 and I found out that I am sensitive to gluten and almost certainly have Celiac. Then I knew and could make the diet and life changes. That was in 2006 and now I feel like I have my health and life back.

    Under Obamacare, I shudder to think how it will be dealt with. I can hardly believe it will get much better but perhaps I'm wrong.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    DDB it would be dealt with in the regular way. Sorry but I really have to roll my eyes here.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
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    Sep. 24, 2003
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    Bristol, TN
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    I'm sympathetic to the OP: as she said, her injury was covered by insurance, just not hers.

    But I can't understand how Obamacare would fix it. I really can't.

    As I understand it, we will all be penalized if we don't carry insurance; however, there's no reason to believe that insurance costs will go down. Is there something about Obamacare that will force surgeons to accept third-party insurance? (I admit, I can't understand why they wouldn't. I think in my neck of the woods--I'm a physician's wife--they would.)


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb View Post
    Amen! I say that all the time.
    I just wish I had some say so as to how I payed for it.
    In what situation would you have say in how you pay for general health care? If someone doesn't have health insurance the general public ends up paying for the ER visit; hospitals raise their prices to cover the costs. If someone loses everything they have (or fixes it that way) so that they can go on Medicaid, you will also pay. There is no way not to pay and you will not have a say in it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by gully's pilot View Post
    I'm sympathetic to the OP: as she said, her injury was covered by insurance, just not hers.

    But I can't understand how Obamacare would fix it. I really can't.

    As I understand it, we will all be penalized if we don't carry insurance; however, there's no reason to believe that insurance costs will go down. Is there something about Obamacare that will force surgeons to accept third-party insurance? (I admit, I can't understand why they wouldn't. I think in my neck of the woods--I'm a physician's wife--they would.)
    There may have to be legislation to force insurance companies to bring their premiums down, because they SHOULD come down, with more people in the pool bringing in money and many not high risk. That's why group rates are always cheaper than individual rates.

    It's true that if in your state you can't opt out of the personal injury insurance in a car accident and Obamacare doesn't have a provision to override that law, you still have to pay and then wait for the insurance to reimburse you. It's ridiculous.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazednconfused View Post
    1. I DO NOT HAVE AN EXTRA $250 to spend! If I had it, I would!
    To all those chastising the OP for her priorities, think about this: my almost-23 y/o son takes classes and works full-time. He is covered under my health insurance thanks to Obamacare. I have access to his checking account and can see his weekly payroll deposits. After he sets aside money for his rent, utilities and state-mandated car insurance, he is left with $35 per check. For everything: food, TP, his allergy-induced asthma medications...

    $35 per week.

    If it weren't for me & Obamacare, he would be in the OP's shoes.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by red mares View Post
    Why do you make that judgment? I have chronic pain and see a doctor several times a year. However, my insurance premiums ARE NOT GOING UP BECAUSE OF CLAIMS. My premiums are going up because the company I work for is being force to change the coverage they offer. Our premiums are linked to pay rates so the more you make, the more you pay. I'm sure that would put a smile on Obama's face.

    I would not have a problem paying increased premium if it were risk based. The increases I'm facing are not remotely risk based.
    Insurance costs sure can go up because of claims. It's happened at the office where my husband works!

    The problems you are facing is because of how insurance companies operate. So what do you want? Socialized medicine, no insurance at all, better caps on insurance premiums? The last option sounds like a good one to me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaybeMorgan View Post
    I don't see that this is issue is about Obamacarea at all.
    The problem is the doctors who won't treat her, even with assurance that they will get paid (she has insurance that will cover the accident). What the hell is wrong with them?
    The problem is that many people will not pay for care. Not defending the doctor's actions here, but that's how it is. Some doctors and hospitals will come up with reasonable payment plans, others will not. And some people just don't think they should have to pay. They spoil the barrel for everyone else.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time Rider View Post
    Even if you HAVE health insurance, don't assume that your health insurance will pay for what the doctors deem are necessary tests.
    Ain't that the truth?!

    Not only did my coworker have to wait a month to have his broken hip properly diagnosed, but in 2008, I had to fight CIGNA to cover a PET scan. You know, the full-body scan that stages your cancer diagnosis? It seems I had the wrong kind of cancer until my radiologist set them straight.

    My parents are fighting their insurance (self-insured company) to cover prosthetics for my dad. After post-surgical complications in 2011, his right hand was amputated. His left hand is nearly useless but they've transplanted muscle from his leg into the arm in an attempt to get him some use back. It took the company nearly 2 months to approve a simple HOOK for Dad's stump, even though they knew he could not feed himself or even wipe his own butt. He still cannot bathe himself.

    My parents live in fear that Mom's employer will decide Dad is too expensive (Mom has her own issues) and eliminate Mom's position before they're eligible for Medicare in 4 years. There will be no health exchange for them to buy into because their governor (WI's Walker) won't opt in. And they voted for him. Twice.

    Yes, the American for-profit insurance industry is very, very broken. Obamacare is the first serious attempt to make it better and there still is much room for improvement.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #100
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    The problem is that many people will not pay for care. Not defending the doctor's actions here, but that's how it is. Some doctors and hospitals will come up with reasonable payment plans, others will not. And some people just don't think they should have to pay. They spoil the barrel for everyone else.
    Each one of us as a patient are one and the most important in the whole world.

    To those in health care, we are one of several dozen patients they see a day.
    No matter how caring a health care provider wants to be, they just can't, day after day, have several patients like the OP, cater to their insurance problems and stay in business.

    We don't know about this story from the side of the health care providers and yes, it seems terrible that no one has stepped on and helped her get care right away.
    Those are the cases that fall thru the cracks and the news stories are made off.
    Terrible when it happens to you or those you know, but how many times does that happen, how many times health care providers step in and carry those patients, several of them a day?

    I would not put too much blame here, we don't know how much those health care providers have already stepped out to help and when they called it halt why.

    If some here didn't do what they need to do, well, that is what attorneys are for, although that is not what a patient wants, it wants good care.

    Easy to say in hindsight, but I would have kept showing up in an ER and kept demanding they attend to my wrist, every day and not let them give me the run around, until they found someone to fix it.

    OP, I hope you get something done, your wrist heals well and later this will be a nightmare you will never want to remember.



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