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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default Besides sending money, is there anything we can do for the people affected by Sandy?

    I've already donated to the Red Cross. But I'm also going to be moving out that way and jobless and could volunteer.

    Do we know if there are any other options to help people out there?

    I am just sick knowing these people are without necessities and it's cold. COLD. And another storm on the way.

    Does anyone have links of how to physically help? I can't send any more money. But I'm willing to work.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    11,271

    Default

    All we have going on here are blood drives. That's it. Nothing Sandy-related except those. You can volunteer to work those if you want to as they are always asking for volunteers to help organize and carry out the tasks.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    I can't donate blood due to some travel issues. But I could volunteer otherwise. I can't believe there isn't more we can do.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    11,271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    I can't donate blood due to some travel issues. But I could volunteer otherwise. I can't believe there isn't more we can do.
    Around here, volunteering is basically limited to blood/food drives and working with special needs/elderly/immigrants. If you want to do some volunteer work, I know of something you can do that gets you free use of the Rec Center in Springfield, which I think you'll love during the Winter since the pool is heated and they have a really nice fitness center.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2009
    Location
    nw ct
    Posts
    687

    Default

    Good for you!
    Where is "out there?" NJ? NY? CT? What about contacting the nearest, (to wherever you're going), town hall or fire department and ask them directly how you can help?
    Last edited by tucktaway; Nov. 4, 2012 at 07:56 PM.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2009
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    150

    Default

    I've noticed on craigslist lots of people offering space and/or hot food to those that have been displaced. This is mainly in the areas nearby though like new jersey and nyc.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    I can't donate blood due to some travel issues. But I could volunteer otherwise. I can't believe there isn't more we can do.
    Okay, before I say this, please know that I'm not trying to be a killjoy. I'm saying this because the next time the world experiences something like Hurricane Sandy, it would be *wonderful* if we were all more prepared, and that preparation tends to take some time.

    But at this point, unless you already live in the disaster zone and have training in disaster relief and/or have special competencies that can help get power and supply chains moving--for example, maybe you're an expert at backing up and restoring damaged computer systems--then there's not probably not much you can do. There isn't much need for inexperienced hands at times like this, and they can create inefficiencies and redundancies that aren't welcome in a time of crisis. If you live IN the disaster zone, that is often a different story, and if you do, consult your local newspaper or a blog entry like this:
    http://www.treehugger.com/culture/12...f-efforts.html

    But if I really wanted to know what I could do that was most efficient and effective, I'd start here:

    1. Call my local branch of a relief agency, like the Red Cross, and ask if there was anything particularly that I could do to help. For example, maybe they're already planning to send a big shipment of blankets up to the disaster area, and you could do a neighborhood collection of blankets. (Note: I totally made that example up. For all I know, they could be collecting batteries or candles or Taco Bell Chalupas.) But the point is, call and ask. Most people aren't going to call and ask, so you can make a real impact by helping the relief agency get what they need.

    To tell a heartwarming story, my mother did this once with the local food bank. She had come in with her usual box of random stuff from her own cupboard, and the lady at the desk mentioned that they had run out of turkeys for the upcoming holiday. Because of the way the food pantry's budget worked, they couldn't just reshuffle money to buy more turkeys. My mom asked her how many turkeys they had room to store and what kinds of storage they had (fridges, freezers, etc.), and then she marched down to the local Shopper's Food Warehouse and explained the situation. She negotiated with the manager to buy a huge lot of frozen turkeys for near wholesale cost. The food bank folks were moved to tears when she dropped it off.

    2. Raise money and send it to a big relief organization. Have a car wash, a bake sale, a door-to-door thing, make a plea at your local church meeting/reading group/whatever, etc. Money matters, and a lot of people won't bother to give unless and until you ask.

    3. Research opportunities to train for disaster relief pertinent to your areas of expertise, and pursue them. If you're a nurse or a psychologist, for example, there are opportunities to train for disaster relief. But there's also opportunities for everyday folks. I know many horsepeople who get a huge sense of fulfillment for training for mounted search and rescue, and I trained for some basic on-the-ground search and rescue in college.

    4. You might be far from the hurricane zone, but I bet $100 there are cold, hungry people in your area who desperately need help--and those people are not only forgotten on most days, they are particularly forgotten or overlooked when the country turns its attention to a natural disasters. I don't say this to minimize the suffering of folks impacted by Hurricane Sandy, and I couldn't be more glad that the Red Cross and other organizations are attending to the hurricane. But it also doesn't mean that the people down the street are any less hungry than they were before the hurricane. Consider donating to your local food pantry or pursuing other local volunteer efforts "in honor" of Hurricane Sandy victims.
    Last edited by jn4jenny; Nov. 4, 2012 at 09:11 PM.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Thanks Jen
    I've already donated, probably more than I should have since I just have a 4k dog vet bill this week and won't be employed after tomorrow.

    I AM actually well versed in recovery of data and data systems as well as other technology things, I also have health certifications.

    I used to work in a hospital, so I'm vaccinated for all the hep stuff too and just had another TB test.I'm very very qualified to dig in and help.

    I know how to build stuff. I can carry garbage and haul it out. I can take care of kids. Ican take care of elderly. I and do something.

    I've already sent money. It doesn't seem like it is really HELPING.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,367

    Default

    My cousin's house was swept away... She and her two girls are staying with her mom, but wow... I thought I was devestated after our fire, but at least I had the ability to gather remnants to document for insurance....

    They will get to go look at the foundation tomorrow for the first time.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,137

    Default

    I'm wondering about the pets. I know people are reclaiming lost dogs & cats every day, thank goodness, and FB has a page where you can post ones you've lost or ones you've found, but I'm thinking there's going to be extra kitties washed up somewhere that may need homes.

    Here's the FB page I saw: https://www.facebook.com/SandysPets



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    You know, one group that is being overlooked all over the
    country are the families of linemen and similar folks. Yes,
    the workers are earning extra pay for their service but
    how does it help their spouse and children deal with any
    home emergencies while they are gone? Might be a real
    kindness to offer modest support to these people.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    286

    Default

    There is a lot that can be done by the "lay person" volunteer crews are working every day at municipal and boor halls. Lots of hands are needed at donation sites sorting the donations. People are needed to deliver food and clothing to those home bound but without power, in one town the are actually looking for people to pick up supplies at distribution sites and deliver them to homeowners too scared to leave their homes because of the looting problem.

    I am picking up a displaced dog to foster till the family gets a permenant living situation since they won't be able to get back in what is left of their home for a minimum of 6-8 months.

    I drove around the other day with my 700 watt invertor hooked up to my truck as sort of a mobile charging station. The invertor up to last week was used to power a blender during hunt pace tailgates

    Delivering gas to,people who's cars were destroyed in the water who can't get out to obtain gas for their generators.

    The power was out last year for Irene but the it was August and not November. Is cold around here.

    Thank you for wanting to help. Pet shelters need food, blankets, cat litter and help. I personally am working with Seer Farm who helps owners needing short term foster care for their pets due to hospitalization, family crisis, fire, flood, and now hurricane. They could use supplies, too.



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