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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2008
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    1,658

    Default Lasiks Vision Correction

    I did a search and nothing came up, so I hope this hasn't already been done a hundred times.

    I'm thinking of getting Lasiks and had made the appt for the initial appt and then I made the mistake of looking at videos on YouTube about the surgery. Now I'm not so sure I could go through with it.

    How do you stay still while they are doing all that? Does it hurt...I know they say "pressure", but some pressures can hurt. Did it totally freak you out having someone work on your eyes, or was there nothing to it?

    Any problems, especially with night vision?

    Thanks, NJR
    Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does.



  2. #2
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    Try searching on LASIK. I've had it and would do it again in a heartbeat. They can pretty much determine if you are likely to experience problems with night vision before the surgery. It depends on the size of your pupils and the amount of correction needed. They put drops in your eyes so you do feel some pressure but it's not uncomfortable. You can smell the cornea burning, it's like the odor of hotshoeing a horse. It's very quickly gone.

    It takes less than 30 seconds per eye. Compared to a mammogram, gyn exam and even having blood drawn it's a non event
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Default

    My brother (a medivac pilot in the Army) had it done. Great results. My best friend ( a doctor) had it and she had great results. Both had astigmatism which is hard to correct with contacts. I don't know much about it myself, but I think it's worth looking into!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  4. #4
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    Dec. 21, 2005
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    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Default

    I was very apprehensive and am super sensitive about anyone touching my eyes. I firmly believe that lasik was the absolute best thing I have ever done for myself.

    I felt no pain or pressure during the procedure. The doctor prescribed Valium, but I didn't take it because I know narcotics never work on me. All I had to do was stare at a red dot. I was terrified that I would move and mess it up, but the doctor assured me that the computers would sense and shut down if I moved so no damage would be done. I think the whole thing, start to finish, was about 10 minutes.

    About an hour after, my eyes did start to sting, but I took a nap and when I woke up I could see perfectly and the pain was gone. My procedure was done on a Friday morning, so I had my post-op appointment that same afternoon. I didn't drive myself to the appointment, but I absolutely could have.

    It been about 6 years since I had it done. My contacts used to give me halos at night, but I have not encountered that at all after lasik.
    "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett



  5. #5
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    24,354

    Default

    I may consider it at some point too...since my eye doc told me I now HAVE to wear my glasses if I want to actually SEE. (he's mean)

    2 of my sisters, a brother, 3 cousins, my ex and a butt-load of friends have had it done. Every single one said they LOVE it and are thrilled they had it done. For one sister with really crappy eyes...after Lasik was the first time she was able to wake up and see when she first opened her eyes, LOL! She kept telling me, "Did you know that trees aren't big sticks with green blobs on top? They have tons of seperate LEAVES!" Well duh..."But I've never really seen them before!"
    My ex and friends have mostly gotten it for improved eyesight for shooting. My daughter is now considering it for the same reason.

    And everyone I know who's had it that was scared/nervous before have all said as bad as it sounds...it's really not a big deal once they start. And it's quick.

    My hesitation would be for the same reason though...coming at my open eyeball while I'm awake? It's just the thought/sight...freaky.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
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    4,971

    Default

    I wear glasses all of the time if I want to see something not fuzzy more than a few feet away. Does it work if you're nearsighted?

    I can understand the leaves thing. When I started wearing glasses, it was, "Ooooooh. You're supposed to be able to SEE the leaves from afar."

    How much did it cost? Medical insurance sure doesn't pay for it.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Yes it certainly does work if you are nearsighted! I went from 20 200 to 20 20. I do need reading glasses though, but better than the bifocals I used to wear. Some insurance policies do cover it but mine did not. I paid with my FSA which saved a bit. I have a discount code I can send you if you are interested. I don't get a rebate if I send it.

    IIRC it cost around $3100
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  8. #8
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    Jan. 26, 2010
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    So, I don't need glasses to read, which is pretty good for my age. Will I have to if I get the LASIK?

    What's FSA? The pre-tax thing where you can take out medical costs before?

    $3100 for both eyes? Did you do both at the same time?



  9. #9
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    So, I don't need glasses to read, which is pretty good for my age. Will I have to if I get the LASIK?
    If you don't need reading glasses before you won't after, though you might some time down the road
    What's FSA? The pre-tax thing where you can take out medical costs before?
    YUP

    $3100 for both eyes? Did you do both at the same time?
    Yup
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2007
    Location
    NY State
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    Default

    I had horrible vision (extreme nearsightedness and some astigmatism). My post-Lasik vision was nothing short of amazing. I'm so glad I had it done.
    Two things I experienced that I wasn't thrilled about:
    1) My eyes were hypersensitive the evening after surgery. I have very light blue eyes which makes them prone to photosensitivity anyway. I would have taken more meds for the discomfort had I anticipated that.
    2) I was surprised that I suddenly needed reading glasses and could no longer just get really, really close in order to see something easily (as in putting on eyeliner or threading a needle).
    Being middle aged, I guess it was going to happen anyway but the surgery took away the transition stage so it was a little unsettling. But on the plus side, I could suddenly wake up and see the world without putting my glasses on!



  11. #11
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    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    I spoke with a friend who is an MD and was looking into it. He talked to a few optometrists (or opthomologists...can't remember which) about it and all of them said that they would not get it or recommend their family gets it. The general consensus was that they would wait about 10 years to see how it pans out.

    fWIW, these doctors were at UVA and the Cleveland Clinic, so fairly reputable!
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  12. #12
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    Aug. 3, 2005
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    Canada
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    I had the surgery three years ago to correct moderate (-3.25 and -3.5) myopia and a degree of astigmatism, I was 30 at the time. Myopia and hating my glasses made my teenage years absolutely miserable, and while I eventually got used to wearing glasses inside, I could never stand wearing glasses outside (the lack of peripheral vision made me feel unsafe and anxious) or for sports (I always worried about the potential for eye injury from shattered lenses). It got better with contact lenses, but while my vision was wonderful with the contacts (indeed amazing being able to see individual leaves in the trees!) they were irritating my eyes pretty badly after several years.

    The surgery itself is really no big deal, I did not even take the sedative they offered. To me having blood drawn is way more traumatic than this was! Kind of a cool light show (I am a geek). The smell (burnt cornea) is strange but you don't feel a thing, and they numb your eyes with drops so no needles either.

    The preparation, when they put in the thingie that keeps your eyes open is a bit unpleasant (pressure), the first eye was not so bad but the second felt worse. It is also over in a less than a minute though. The aftercare is a bit intensive, I had several different drops to put in my eyes at different intervals which got a bit complicated when you are not supposed to be straining your eyes reading the fine print! Having someone around to help with that and remind you when to put them in and which ones help. I had the surgery Saturday morning and was back at work Monday morning.

    I did see halos at night for over six months afterwards, which made driving at night a bit difficult. This faded away gradually and was almost completely gone after a year. I still see faint halos at night, but I used to before the surgery so not much of a diffference in that regard for me. If I had to redo it though I would plan to have the surgery done in the summer when the days are longer rather than early winter!

    The results were nothing short of amazing.I now have better than 20/20 vision, and it has remained stable so far. My eyes do get a little dry, especially in the winter cold, but nothing regular eye drops will not address. I am so glad I had the surgery, and so grateful that this technology is available.

    One thing to keep in mind is that having the surgery will not prevent you from getting nearsighted as you age, but if it happens it would have happened regardless of whether you had the surgery or not. Personnally I would much rather wear glasses to read than to ride!
    Last edited by Gen; Nov. 4, 2012 at 09:15 PM. Reason: added stuff



  13. #13
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    Oct. 1, 2002
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    Union Bridge, MD
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    Had it done in 2006 and while the procedure itself was a little strange, the results have been terrific.

    Cost was $4500 for both eyes, DH and I had it done pretty much at the same time. I am much less squishy about medical stuff, so I went first. I did not have any pre-meds (DH had Valium).

    The procedure was slightly like being abducted by aliens (or at least how I'd imagine being abducted by aliens might be). They put this rubber gasket over your eyeball to hold the globe in place--it's not painful, but I'd definitely call it uncomfortable. But it was only about 40 seconds per eye, and then I sat in a dark room for about 20 minutes. By the second day post-op, my vision was markedly improved, and then it got a little better each day over the next couple weeks.

    Six years later, I am still good. I am 44 and just starting to need reading glasses, but that's a factor of age, not the surgery. I do have some halos at night, but no worse than I had with my glasses (I couldn't wear contacts beyond about age 22). I do have some dry eye, but it is not so bad that I need drops. All in all, I consider it resounding success.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  14. #14
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    May. 4, 2003
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    A state of confusion
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    I had it done about six years ago and was already in bifocals at the time. They did monovision on me...right eye sees far and left eye sees near. It worked great.

    Unfortunately age is kicking in and in dim light or if the print is really small I need reading glasses. Tons better than bifocals though.

    I do battle dry eyes - much worse in the left eye. If you already have dry eyes or even slightly dry eyes, I would skip it.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 26, 2010
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    Oh yeah, I use bifocals. So, they do different things for each eye? Or, because I don't need glasses to read, I would just get the same?



  16. #16
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    Feb. 20, 2010
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    All 'round Canadia
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    I had it done a few years ago - had terrible vision too, - 6 in one eye and almost as bad in the other, plus astigmatism. A few weeks before surgery the USAF optho guru scared us all with his tales of flaps un-flapping while people were surfing and stuff, so I switched from LASIK to LASIK PRK - basically the same correction, but instead on painless flap you get painful laser-burns-off-layer-of-eyeball. Fun recovery

    The surgery itself was terrifying to me because I have a...thing...about eyeballs. They gave me Ativan, which did nothing. They do numb the eyeball so there was no pain as such, but I was shaking in fear. When they gave me squishy balls to hold onto my body quit shaking, but I swear my face still did!

    It does last seconds; my biggest fear was that I'd stop looking at the red dot and screw up the surgery. But really, if I with my...eyeball...thing can get through it, probably most people without actual phobias can do. I was genuinely freaked out, but it wasn't that bad and my results are great. I needed the artificial tears regularly for a year; I still use them every few days when I remember, but I don't think I need them any more, it's become an inconsistent habit.



  17. #17
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    Dec. 23, 2008
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    Afton, Virginia
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    194

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    My LASIK is scheduled for Nov. 15th and I am so excited!!!! I cannot wait to not have to deal with the hassle of glasses anymore.



  18. #18
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    6,857

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    I had it done in 2003 to correct astigmatism and -8 vision in both eyes. The good news was that it worked really well, 20/15 at first. The bad news is that it has now failed and I'm -1.25 in both eyes with astigmatism, and I don't have enough eye left to have it done again. At least my optometrist doesn't recommend it.

    I did have some problems. I've had chronic dry eye ever since, and for about a year I couldn't drive at night because of the bad halos around car lights -- couldn't see the road. That is fine now but if you have a job that depends on night driving I might be pretty reluctant as it was pretty much impossible for me to drive at night. That said, I would definitely do it again if my eyes were back to -8.



  19. #19
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    Oh yeah, I use bifocals. So, they do different things for each eye? Or, because I don't need glasses to read, I would just get the same?
    This is the team that did my procedure
    http://www.lasikplus.com/location/ri...-lasik-center/

    Dr Wills has done 60,000+ procedures. I originally wanted to have one eye done for distance and one for close but since I am an active rider they suggested against it. We have several pairs of cheap reading glasses scattered around the house since Mr P needs them also. And you can get sunglasses like bifocals, no correction on top and readers below.
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  20. #20
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    Oct. 6, 2002
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    Philadelphia PA
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    At a convention I met a lawyer who exclusively does LASIK malpractice cases. He's filthy rich and turning away cases. He scared the everliving crap out of me! Apparently there are a whole LOT of side effects and they don't really get explained to customers-- if your vision improves, that's reported as a successful surgery even if you have life-altering side effects. He scared me too much for me to even consider it!
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
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