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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,306

    Default Horse Shopping: How Far Do You Take the Snooping?

    Soooo ... how far is too far?

    Friends and acquaintances (professional) know that DQDiva is casually horse shopping. They forward sales ads and she follows up on them (or not).

    Armed with the name and current seller of an interesting candidate, she finds information like "price negotiable to right home" and then another from a different seller, presumably the one who bought from the original, with the horse for sale at $2 (is this code for private treaty?) and then, finally, the expected information on the current seller's site.

    DQDiva would like to know more about the horse's pedigree (advertised as out of a TB mare that isn't on allbreedpedigree.com).

    Is it too much to contact what looks like the first home (breeding facility) to ask about the horse's early years?

    And then follow up with the other publicly accessible seller?

    This is not an inexpensive horse and while she doesn't believe that justifies bad behavior, she's wondering if this is actually out of line, or just reasonable research?

    What say you all?
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,521

    Default

    I say a horse sale is always caveat emptor. The buyer is should be able to acquire whatever information he/she wants on a prospective horse. That's just due diligence.

    I sell horses and would have no problem with a seller checking on details -- pedigree, show records, third party opinions, whatever. I'm going to do the same sort of checking on a prospective buyer who wants to buy a horse from me since I want the horse to go to a situation where it can be successful.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,332

    Default

    Having been the victim of lies in horse selling, I don't think any research is wasted or weird. I'd just nicely ask the current seller if they minded that I would contact previous owners due to my bad experiences in the past. If they don't like that, no sale: They have something to hide.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2008
    Location
    Carrollton, Ga
    Posts
    1,251

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xanthoria View Post
    Having been the victim of lies in horse selling, I don't think any research is wasted or weird. I'd just nicely ask the current seller if they minded that I would contact previous owners due to my bad experiences in the past. If they don't like that, no sale: They have something to hide.
    I am starting to horse shop and I do as much investigation as possible! I google the horse, seller and any shows the sellar claims the horse was in to verify the placings andif it is a paint, I search in the APHA data base. Crazy? Maybe, but my time is valuable and I do not want to waste on a possible dis-honest sellar! You really can find out so much by googling the horses name!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,375

    Default

    Well, I'd say if you can go back and find out what you can, it'd be to your advantage. If there is nothing to hide, then the previous owners should have no problem disclosing everything. If they'd rather not, or they don't reply, you're no worse off than you are to begin with.

    I refer you to the thread I started in the breeding forum "Help Identifying a brand" where I started snooping about horse that I bought. Yes, it was after the purchase and not before, but you can see that the snooping may have literally saved multiple lives, if not heartache, wasted money, and time. If I had the horse's name prior to this I would have googled it and tried to find out as much information as possible.

    I am currently horse shopping again, and googling ALL names has uncovered information sometimes that makes me wary to buy. Sometimes it doesn't, but if you can find a previous ad that mentions a potential issue (club foot, previous injury, odd quirk) you can bring that up to the seller and ask...you might be glad you did. Bottom line: no one will fault you for doing your research, IMHO.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,491

    Default

    I don't think it's out of line if you are seriously interested in the horse and what you hear might affect your decision to have a second ride or travel a long distance to see the horse.

    On the other hand, I'd think it was obnoxious behavior from a tire-kicker. If a decent breeder got one or two phone calls about their horses every time one changed hands I don't think most would mind. If a breeder got 50 phone calls about every horse they ever breed every time one was advertised they'd soon get pretty sick of it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,564

    Default

    Contacting the breeder has never occured to me, but I have contacted a previous owner in the case of a horse that had recently changed hands, and in the case of a horse I sold, the buyer did contact the breeder...I think the breeder liked knowing where her "baby" was going.

    I fully support googling, and searching youtube for any possible additional information.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,306

    Default

    Thanks .... I mean DQDiva says thanks for your thoughts. She's not tire kicking just familiar with too many recent stories of mystery behaviors and lamenesses.
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff



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