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  1. #1
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    Dec. 28, 2007
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    Question Fur.

    I realize I've come a bit late to the party but hopefully OT day stays open long enough to get some responses!

    How do you feel about the use of (authentic) fur in clothing, accessories, etc? Do you see it in the same light as using leather products or eating meat? Why or why not?

    Thanks



  2. #2
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    Default

    Personally, it's not for me. I see all the nasty stuff that my dog rolls in, and I wouldn't want to wear it.

    I don't think that you can say that you won't wear fur, but then wear leather. I also have a slight issue with people who don't eat meat because it's 'inhumane' but wear leather boots, ride in leather saddles and bridles, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


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  3. #3
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    Mar. 3, 2007
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    I'm ok with it as long as it came off of something that was being slaughtered for food as its primary purpose. Stuff like cowhide, leather, etc. Personally, I don't like fur on my garments, as far as fashion goes.
    Quarry Rat


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Sep. 26, 2010
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    I don't have a problem with fur if the animal was raised for that purpose. For example, I don't have a problem with mink coats if the animals were raised on farms specifically for their pelts. That is as opposed to trapping wild animals where their numbers may not be particularly high.

    I like having fur trim on gloves and coats, but I probably wouldn't want a full fur coat. They are hard to maintain and are things you can't wear for a majority of the year even in my area of the east coast. I'd much rather have a fur-trimmed collar on a jacket that I can wear in the fall, winter and early spring, as opposed to a fur coat that I can only wear in the dead of winter.



  5. #5
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    Jan. 10, 2008
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    Western NY
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    I am fine with leather as a by-product of meat. I was a vegetarian for a long time and do generally try to limit my meat intake when possible, but I am more concerned with having humane standards for raising and slaughtering meat animals. We are designed to eat meat, and while it's possible (and a good ethical choice) to live meat-free, it's not for everyone.

    However, I can't ethically support slaughtering an animal because you want to wear it. It was one thing when fur was essential for survival in a cold climate; now it's just a fashion thing, and it seems wrong to take a life of any sort just to fit in to some trend.


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  6. #6
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    Apr. 29, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosey_2003 View Post
    I'm ok with it as long as it came off of something that was being slaughtered for food as its primary purpose. Stuff like cowhide, leather, etc. Personally, I don't like fur on my garments, as far as fashion goes.
    Quote Originally Posted by SarahandSam View Post
    I can't ethically support slaughtering an animal because you want to wear it.
    This is how I feel about it as well. I'm all about using as much of an animal as possible when it's slaughtered, but I don't want to kill things unless I'm going to eat them.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
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    Default A good life & 1 bad day

    My problem with animals raised for their pelts is their living conditions. I don't draw a distinction between raising for food and raising for fur/leather. The animal has a purpose, was bred for a purpose.... and I'm ok with that. BUT the only way I would be associated with it at all is if said animal got to BE that animal while they were alive. Give them a "good life and 1 bad day" and I have zero problem with using the animal for whatever purpose you want to breed them for. That's the way I treat the animals I raise. Chickens get to peck and scratch the ground, eat bugs and grass and annoy the horses when they drop feed. Same with my turkeys. Cows get to be cows -- out on grass, with room to move. If I raised hogs, I would have to give them plenty of room to move and dig. This is why I don't have rabbits anymore... I couldnt' stand seeing them not able to BE rabbits -- see sunshine, dig burrows, run and hop and leap. If they can do what nature intended them to do for the time they're alive (have a good life), then humane slaughtering is fine by me (1 bad day). We should all be that lucky, imho.
    Last edited by tle; Nov. 1, 2012 at 10:11 AM. Reason: spelling
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

    "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike


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  8. #8
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    i'm in total agreement with you tle.
    great slogan too-- a great life with one bad day--moment even!



  9. #9
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Conspicuous consumption isn't my style. Fur just doesn't do anything for me. It's kind of like wearing a gangsta load of gold jewelry. I could rearrange my budget to buy the bling if I wanted, but I don't feel the urge. Intellectually I'm aware that living in a fur farm is a pretty unfulfilling life for the average critter, but it's not something that I spend a lot of emotional energy on.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    If you wear leather shoes why would you object to fur?

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


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  11. #11
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    I love it. It's warm, soft, silky, and I'll kill animals to eat them when I don't have to, so why not kill animals (that I like substantially less than cows and chickies and duckies and cute little pigs) for clothing? I wouldn't eat most of them (except rabbit, though I don't actually like rabbit fur, and muskrat; I'm told they're quite good if you don't nick the musk glands when skinning them) but dead is dead either way. If you don't use all the feathers and scraps from meat animals (and given how the premium dog food companies are selling people a bill of goods about the horrors of meat "by-products", that's getting hard to do) it's no different than not using unpalatable meat from animals raised for the pelt or hide.

    And anyway, minks are nasty, foul little beasts who kill each other for kicks in the wild, never mind on mink farms. I don't have a problem killing the little monsters. Heck, I'm still wondering how our one cat managed to catch one without getting mangled (he came trotting up the driveway one day with that cat look that says "Look what *I* caught!" with a mink. Not a scratch on him, either. He did weigh 15 pounds, so I'm sure it was easier than it would be for one of the 8-pound barn cats.)


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    If you wear leather shoes why would you object to fur?

    G.
    Read previous posts.



  13. #13
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    I personally like fur, but don't buy it new. I do buy fake fur. I have a mink stole from my great-aunt that I inherited, it's from the 1960's and it's fabulous. I think that being ethically opposed to fur while still eating conventionally-farmed meat and using leather is a bit hypocritical, since animals being raised for meat in the conventional way aren't treated much more nicely than animals being raised for fur. While I try to eat local, organic, and free-range as much as possible, I still do eat conventionally-raised meat, eggs, and dairy, and I use and wear leather. But the way I see it, wearing second-hand fur isn't supporting the fur industy, it's making sure the product doesn't go to waste. So I'm not going to let my fabulous vintage mink collect dust in my closet just because I might get some dirty looks in the street.
    friend of bar.ka


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by suz View Post
    i'm in total agreement with you tle.
    great slogan too-- a great life with one bad day--moment even!
    Would love to take credit but I think it was Joel Salatin where I first read/heard the quote. Glad you like it!
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

    "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike



  15. #15
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    I actually won't wear fake fur--I have never found any that I like the feel of, and I'm insanely picky about textures (I go through clothing shops and fabric stores feeling the material before I even think about buying, as I don't want something that LOOKS pretty but FEELS awful. Yeah, I wind up with a lot of cotton...)



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    If you don't use all the feathers and scraps from meat animals (and given how the premium dog food companies are selling people a bill of goods about the horrors of meat "by-products", that's getting hard to do) it's no different than not using unpalatable meat from animals raised for the pelt or hide.
    I'm actually fine with feeding my dog meat by-products. Left to her own devices she's perfectly happy to eat things like lips, organs, ears, feet, and so on, so why let that stuff go to waste? And she absolutely LOVES those bull penis chews.

    Does anyone know what actually happens to most carcasses of animals raised for fur?

    Given that I'm just not that into it, I haven't really worried about it much. And I agree with Celeritas, that buying used doesn't add to the number of animals being raised for fur, so I don't have a problem with that either.

    On the topic of a good life with a bad (but quick) end, we're not currently set up for much livestock here, but I hope to raise more of my own food in the future. DH and I are planning on expanding in 2-3 years, though we'll probably start small, with a few chickens.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  17. #17
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    My problem with animals raised for their pelts is their living conditions. I don't draw a distinction between raising for food and raising for fur/leather. The animal has a purpose, was bred for a purpose.... and I'm ok with that. BUT the only way I would be associated with it at all is if said animal got to BE that animal while they were alive. Give them a "good life and 1 bad day" and I have zero problem with using the animal for whatever purpose you want to breed them for.
    exactly. I think wild-caught fur, or wild-caught meat, is therefore ethically superior, since the animal actually did get to live as it is intended to live, as long as they killed the animal quickly and as pain-free as possible- none of these nasty traps.
    It seems rather wasteful to me to raise animals just for their fur- if you're going to go to all that effort, might as well raise an animal you can eat AND wear.
    Another option for fur- how many people have skunks, raccoons, marmots that are making nuisances of themselves and the people want them removed? they have nice fur. If you're going to wipe out the pest, might as well "recycle" part of it. You could advertise the fur as an environmentally sound, humane solution to a problem.



  18. #18
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    Another option for fur- how many people have skunks, raccoons, marmots that are making nuisances of themselves and the people want them removed? they have nice fur. If you're going to wipe out the pest, might as well "recycle" part of it. You could advertise the fur as an environmentally sound, humane solution to a problem.
    Coming next on the Fall 2013 runways: Davey Crockett hats are back! Send one to Anna Wintour, quick!
    friend of bar.ka



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayside View Post
    I'm actually fine with feeding my dog meat by-products. Left to her own devices she's perfectly happy to eat things like lips, organs, ears, feet, and so on, so why let that stuff go to waste? And she absolutely LOVES those bull penis chews.
    Yeah, I don't care (given what they eat if i turn my back for five minutes, scrap bits that are too hard to cut off the carcass whole do not bother me-heck, I eat Spam and it's the scraps from pork shoulder and ham that don't come off in a usable pretty big cut) but the way Blue Buffalo advertises...just another reason not to waste money on 'premium' dog foods.

    Does anyone know what actually happens to most carcasses of animals raised for fur?
    AFAIK, they're either composted or processed into fertilizer or processed and fed back to the other animals. Minks don't care, they'll eat ANYTHING. (Anything that used to be living, anyway. One reason the RARA's "rescues" where they 'free the minks" always go horribly wrong-they kill anything they come across, like birds, and failing that, kill each other. Fur farms that can't sell their product would just have to kill them all anyway.)



  20. #20
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    ^^ my problem with the dog foods that use by-products isn't the fact that my dog will be eating chicken feet or whatever, it's the fact that the meats and by-products come from animals that aren't fit for consumption because they're dead/dying/diseased/disabled (google "4-D's of dog food"). It's about the production process, not necessarily about the "yucky bits" that my dog would eat anyway.
    friend of bar.ka



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