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  1. #21
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Yeah well. End of the world has been pronounced how many times in the last 10 years? Still here.

    I watched a single episode and the whole time I was thinking....WTH folks? A gun in every room and you are paranoid on top of it? You'll be shooting someone by accident before you know it, then you'll be in jail and all your work will be for nothing.

    That said, I think it's good to have skills (know how to load and use ONE firearm), how to can/dry produce and have enough food/water to last a couple of weeks. All of that is reasonable, but to the rest? Crazee is everywhere.

    These folks smacked uncomfortably close to the Sovereign Citizen Movement for me.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I'm always surprised to hear of folks who can't access water if the power goes out and they have livestock. My neighbor went without a generator for almost a decade with 7 horses at home. Talk about buying lots of water! Ouch! She finally got a generator 3 years ago, thank goodness on the timing since we lost power twice last year for a week. Have a few friends who don't have one yet. I keep telling them it's a better purchase than that last saddle, clinic, show, etc.
    We will be purchasing a generator soon (as soon as they are re-stocked from this storm), but what I really want instead, or in addition to, I guess, is a non-electric water solution. So we will probably manage both eventually. In a long-term power outage or energy crisis, I'd like to be able to access water without using a generator...seems like gasoline would soon become a precious commodity very soon.

    Trying to weigh the pros and cons of a hand-powered deep well pump v. digging a shallow well/cistern v. some sort of solar power backup for my electric well pump as we have 100% southern exposure.... I would love to have more than one option too -- e.g. maybe we'll put in a cistern by the barn but use a generator for the house? That would be great....



  3. #23
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    S1969, have you thought about a windmill? We used one for years to water livestock when I was a kid. One of our neighbors has one now that he uses for waters. They are quite common in the south west to provide water to remote pastures where there is no electricity.



  4. #24
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    S1969, have you thought about a windmill? We used one for years to water livestock when I was a kid. One of our neighbors has one now that he uses for waters. They are quite common in the south west to provide water to remote pastures where there is no electricity.
    Hmm...no, I never have thought about it. I wonder how much wind you need to make one work effectively? I know there are wind farms in NY state but I don't know anyone who has a "home version"....



  5. #25
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    Feb. 7, 2005
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    Lancaster, PA
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    If the world ends, do I really want to drag my life out by a few months spent in a windowless underground bunker eating canned ravioli? I think I'd rather just croak along with everybody else.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Mar. 13, 2006
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    Sno County
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    I tried to link a cartoon I had regarding the Mayan end of the calendar meaning end of days.

    It shows two Mayans, one holding his stone round calendar saying to another that he only had enough room to go to December 20(?) 2012. The other says 'Ha, that'll freak somebody out someday."


    About how I feel about it. Y2K anyone?
    Last edited by Mtn trails; Nov. 2, 2012 at 12:33 AM.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  7. #27
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    S1969, as I recall it doesn't take a lot of wind to power a home windmill. Here's a link you might want to look at www.obrockwindmills.com



  8. #28
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Well if the aftermath includes no power then I hope I am not one of the survivors. I may be a tough horsewoman but I am no pioneer woman! These past few days illustrate the fact that you can't go back to a time without creature comforts.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    I hear you Laurierace. I think its been 12 or 13 years ago, when we had a ginormous ice storm that began on Christmas day. We were without power for 2 weeks. We bought bottled water to drink and cook with, caught run off from the melting ice/snow to wash with and if you wanted to flush, you had to go to the bayou behin the house and fill up a bucket. We had a generator to run the pellet stove, one lamp and the TV but since the well is some distance from the house, no water. After a couple of days I was ready to be "voted off the island". When the power crews showed up, I was ready to kiss them. Nothing like being without power to make you appreciate a hot shower.



  10. #30
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    May. 8, 2006
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    Northern Indiana
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    Personally, if the world digresses to a point where people would have to live in underground bunkers for 10 years, I'm not sure I'd want to be alive anyway.....I mean, I wouldn't want to die an untimely death....but seriously, living underground (no internet!!!) would be boring as hell lol
    To be loved by a horse should fill us with awe, for we hath not deserved it.



  11. #31
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    I'm planning to do a lot of looting. If lots of people suddenly end up dead, but not me for some mysterious reason, I figure there'll be unowned STUFF everywhere, so why bother stockpiling pre-disaster?
    when we have real natural disasters, they usually make people evacuate, so your stockpile will be somewhere you're not. That'll come in handy. For us looters.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    I hear you Laurierace. I think its been 12 or 13 years ago, when we had a ginormous ice storm that began on Christmas day. We were without power for 2 weeks. We bought bottled water to drink and cook with, caught run off from the melting ice/snow to wash with and if you wanted to flush, you had to go to the bayou behin the house and fill up a bucket. We had a generator to run the pellet stove, one lamp and the TV but since the well is some distance from the house, no water. After a couple of days I was ready to be "voted off the island". When the power crews showed up, I was ready to kiss them. Nothing like being without power to make you appreciate a hot shower.
    I was so dumb, I boiled big pots of water on the stove and filled the bathtub to make a lukewarm bath by the time it got full enough to get in. Bathed quickly and jumped out to dry off. Turned the hot water on to rinse the tub out only to be greeted by steaming hot water! Apparently, unlike our stove top, you don't have to light the pilot on the gas water heater! I filled it up with hot water and got back in!



  13. #33
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    Sep. 7, 2004
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    Medford Oregon
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    I don't think there is anything wrong with being prepared for the worst. I lived about 45 miles from the epicenter of the Loma Prieta earthquake in '89 and when it hit there was a lot of damage to buildings etc. It was a long time before life went back to normal and we weren't prepared at all. I think now seeing the damage from Hurricane Sandy, it's not a bad idea to have food and basic supplies on hand.

    I think some doomsday preppers go to far but hey if they really want to be self sufficient and ready for a disaster I'm not one to point and laugh.



  14. #34
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    I'm planning to do a lot of looting. If lots of people suddenly end up dead, but not me for some mysterious reason, I figure there'll be unowned STUFF everywhere, so why bother stockpiling pre-disaster?
    when we have real natural disasters, they usually make people evacuate, so your stockpile will be somewhere you're not. That'll come in handy. For us looters.
    Real preppers move to places that are unlikely to need evacuation from natural disasters like tsunamis, floods, tornadoes and hurricanes. Some people are very serious about this.

    One reason it is so hard to be without power is that most of us are just not equipped for it -- simple things like doing laundry would be nearly impossible without an agitator and wringer. Not that doing laundry by hand would ever be easy....but without the right tools it would be horrible. Even things like a non-electric coffee maker and good water storage containers are really helpful.

    We lost power for 4 days with Irene and got quite adept at the basics of cooking, washing dishes and ourselves, etc. using propane and firewood...but it was summer and the weather was great. It wasn't a huge hardship to have to make our meals on the grill. But in the winter....it would have been quite different - cold and dark! We do have oil lamps and candleabras now, which make a huge difference in being able to work and read in the dark.

    Things I'd like to get (other than my well pump or cistern) - an outdoor oven....might go in with a deck remodel this year and a root cellar. I have a garden full of beets and no cool, dry place to store them safely. Not a huge fan of pickled beets but can't think of any other solution at the moment other than trading them...



  15. #35
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    May. 12, 2000
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    NE TN, USA
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    Preppers are so 1950s.

    Living in a mountainous rural area, we stay prepared to go 2 weeks without power, especially during the winter.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  16. #36
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    What are you "prepping" for? Short (under 7 days), medium (under 30 days), or long term (more than 30 days) consequences? Each will require a different approach and different stuff (although you'll have some overlap).

    Where are you "prepping?" Urban or suburban or exurban or rural?

    What skills do you have besides being able to buy stuff on line?

    Just about anybody, anywhere can keep a seven day supply of food (ready to eat), water, sanitation supplies, and personal protection items on hand. But if you live where flooding is likely then don't store your supplies in the basement. If you live where hurricanes or tornado are common don't store your supplies in the attic.

    For a real medium-term natural disaster (earthquake, volcano eruption, dam collapse, etc.) it's likely that you'll have emergency relief supplies available and help with security (National Guard, extra police, etc.). It might take seven days to get to everybody, but as long as governmental authority is functional it will happen.

    For a long term, natural disaster it's unlikely that most folks could effectively keep what they need to have in sufficient quantity to be effective. It took years to rebuild after Katrina; it will take a long time to rebuild after Sandy. Unless you want to keep your own version of a "Home Depot" in your basement or barn you're better off with good insurance than anything else.

    If you've got a genuine societal collapse then your problem is multiplied exponentially. The short term supplies will buy you the time to organize, with your neighbors, a "mini-society" that will protect its members. The "disaster movies" never show this, but it's happened on multiple occasions after big events. It's not very dramatic and doesn't offer much chance for gun play so Hollywood doesn't ever show it. But it's likely to happen. It may not, however, be very PC.

    I watched a show a while back about a guy who builds and sells "bunkers" to "preppers." The people who were buying them for storm shelters were reasonably smart. But those who were looking to "hunker down" and allow a social storm to pass were candidates for a Darwin award. I could "bust" any bunker this guy offered with what I have on the farm, right now.

    No "prepper" show I ever saw addressed such things as learning to plow with a team; having seed, fertilizer, pesticide, etc. available; having black power weapons on hand (and knowing how to both use them and how to make black powder); how to build and run a steam boiler; etc. Again, these are the very un-dramatic things that will make long term survival possible.

    I doubt NatGeo will have me as a viewer for this sort of nonsense.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  17. #37
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    Feb. 5, 2010
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    I *do* have a little tiny "hurricane closet" with some canned food, water, bleach, flashlights, batteries, candles, etc. It used to have some peanut M&Ms and other yummy stuff, but that has been raided. I should restock in case of emergency, I suppose.

    I also own a book about how to survive a zombie uprising, so I think I'm good. Oh, and I might also have a book about a robot uprising. So, yeah, I am all set for hurricanes, zombies, and robots. Anything else and I'm probably screwed, or I'll go looting with Wendy.



  18. #38
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    Oct. 14, 2012
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    Not end times, but have an active enough imagination and knowledge of history to know that 'it' could hit the fan at any time in a variety of ways. We already had goals of land and becoming as self sufficient as possible, the prepper movement has just given the SO additional ideas.

    Also, the weapon collection may have grown just in case

    We watched the show and many of the subjects seemed to be using prepping as a way to cope with some serious anxiety disorders. The poor dad who shot his thumb while out 'training' with his sons was pretty funny!
    Last edited by volvo_240; Nov. 1, 2012 at 07:01 PM. Reason: added stuff



  19. #39
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    Mar. 18, 2005
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    This is what I do for every winter: I stock up on everything I can so hubby only has to bring home the regular items like bread, milk, butter (if I run out of it in the freezer) and eggs. I have a garden wich I freeze and can tons of stuff plus an appletree too. I go to bulk food stores and stock up on stuff like flour, cornstarch, boulion, ect...
    For storms ..thunderstorms, blizzards, ice storms, The frist thing I do is fill our bathtubs with water. This way we have water to wash up with and flush the toilet. I fill up gallon jugs with drinking water, and five gallon and a couple 55 gallon barrels of water for the horses. I usually pop up some popcorn and put that in plastic bags too. I make sure all our cellphones are charged along with game devices, and kindles and I make sure the battery pack is charged too so we can keep recharging stuff and have a small lamp on. We alternate between the freezer and frig with the generator and the tv if its winter then we don't put the tv on the generator but we put the blower on our cornburner on it. I have a drawer full of flashlights and batteries and candles through out the house.

    But the first thing I do is always make sure we have a huge supply of water. Our neighbors have a full farm generator with power supplied by their tractor so if we do run out of water we just go to their farm and get it from them.



  20. #40
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    Sep. 5, 2007
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    945

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    One thing that hasn't been mentioned but is also very important, is not just natural disasters, but also loss of income or other financial hardships. I've known a few people who had really good jobs, and made sure their food storage was excellent. One or both of the parents were laid off or had health issues and couldn't work, but they had enough food to eat without having to worry about paying the electricity or putting food on the table. Will this last forever? Of course not, but any little bit helps when you are faced with that sort of situation.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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