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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
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    2,527

    Default Farrier question update

    If it is okay to ask I am wondering what others are paying for shoeing. And specifically what kind of shoeing?

    I changed farrier this June. My farrier nice and I appreciate his services. But I have been paying $200 every five weeks for front steel shoes, one egg bar and one regular shoe no pads. To add leather pads I will be paying $250 which I am starting to feel is a-little much for what I can afford.

    I am wondering what others are paying and for what kind of shoeing.

    Thank you in advance!
    Last edited by Fharoah; Nov. 6, 2012 at 03:48 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,921

    Default

    I think you're in Canada, so I'm not sure how our prices compare. To clarify, is your horse just wearing front shoes (one bar shoe, one regular shoe) & he's barefoot behind? Or does he have plain steel shoes on the hinds?

    I will say - regarding a farrier looking for work AND he's cheap... there's usually a reason he doesn't have a full book of clients and he's less expensive. You want the farrier that has so many clients you have to beg him to take on another horse.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    My horse has steel fronts and is bare behind. Canadian dollar is pretty much equal to the US if not slightly Canadian is slightly above the US dollar.
    Last edited by Fharoah; Oct. 28, 2012 at 02:20 AM.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
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    4,727

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    $200/visit. One TB, plain steel all around plus trimming 2 tiny ponies all around. When we get stud holes and leather pads, the price goes up a little.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    5,708

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    So much depends on where you are located. I've been paying $175 for 4 steel shoes with toe clips, about every 5-6 weeks. Sometimes the shoes get reused if we have not been out on the trails (it's rocky here.) Winter shoes -- with borium and rim pads -- run about $250.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,463

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    I think you need to be more specific about where you are.

    I've just run the gamut on bad and expensive farriers. My awesome guy moved to Arizona this spring and I ended up with a guy who had moved up here from SoCal. Apparently he missed the memo that when you're no longer living with the SoCal cost of living you don't get to charge SoCal rates. He started at $350 for a set of 4 steel shoes, but couldn't get any clients. By the time I hired him he was down to $200 for a set of 4 steel shoes (still way high around here, but I was willing to try). Had to fire him after he crippled one horse and had all of the others out of balance. Next guy also up here from SoCal. He was $225 for a set of 4 steel shoes. I told him I would pay $150 and he agreed. Had to move on when his shoeing jobs left the horses looking like they were 8 weeks into a cycle on day 1.

    Finally found a really great farrier who's local. He charges $115 for a set of 4 steel shoes. Higher, obviously, for pads, drilling and tapping, etc. But what I would consider average for the area for someone capable of shoeing sporthorses. For trims, my old guy was $45 a trim, the next two guys were $60-$75 a trim, and my new guy is $50 a trim (I think).

    But I would expect to (and did) pay more *in* Seattle than over here on the peninsula, and in any other major horse-y areas around any cities. So I think it definitely depends on where you are.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  7. #7
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    I think you need to be more specific about where you are.

    I've just run the gamut on bad and expensive farriers. My awesome guy moved to Arizona this spring and I ended up with a guy who had moved up here from SoCal. Apparently he missed the memo that when you're no longer living with the SoCal cost of living you don't get to charge SoCal rates. He started at $350 for a set of 4 steel shoes, but couldn't get any clients. By the time I hired him he was down to $200 for a set of 4 steel shoes (still way high around here, but I was willing to try). Had to fire him after he crippled one horse and had all of the others out of balance. Next guy also up here from SoCal. He was $225 for a set of 4 steel shoes. I told him I would pay $150 and he agreed. Had to move on when his shoeing jobs left the horses looking like they were 8 weeks into a cycle on day 1.

    Finally found a really great farrier who's local. He charges $115 for a set of 4 steel shoes. Higher, obviously, for pads, drilling and tapping, etc. But what I would consider average for the area for someone capable of shoeing sporthorses. For trims, my old guy was $45 a trim, the next two guys were $60-$75 a trim, and my new guy is $50 a trim (I think).

    But I would expect to (and did) pay more *in* Seattle than over here on the peninsula, and in any other major horse-y areas around any cities. So I think it definitely depends on where you are.

    I live in BC. I know the very best farrier in the region is around 200 for all four. He is the one all of the A barns use but had an injury so already has too many clients. Most of the farrier in our region are less than that.

    My farrier is charging me $200 regardless of weather we use new shoes or just reset. Mostly we just reset as my horse is just a pasture pet. But the main reason I am contemplating making a change is because I am concerned his toes appear alittle long in which vet agreed and I have asked about that and it has not changed much. I am also concerned one foot is longer than the other and that he goes sore for the first week after shoeing. I am planning on hauling him to the vet clinic to have him shod there using radiographs to judicially address any concerns as my vet has allot of experience and gets along well with my farrier very well. I like my farrier so want to work with him but am also feeling that realistically I am 30 have 2 horses and three cats a house and three part time jobs to support it and am just not feeling $200 is just a bit much for me. I like my farrier why it is hard for me to let him go, just questioning if it makes sense.

    Thus curious what others are paying.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    3,836

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    If the horse is just a pasture pet, why is he wearing shoes?
    I am concerned his toes appear alittle long in which vet agreed and I have asked about that and it has not changed much.
    Why not? ie: what has been the response from your farrier?

    Regardless, you should find comfort in the fact that there is no record of any pasture pet dying from having toes that appear 'a little long'
    I am also concerned one foot is longer than the other.....
    Very few horses have perfectly matched feet. Often, a skilled farrier can get them to match for a short time. After that, they no longer match. Nor should they. Does your horse perhaps have Long toe-High heel syndrome? Is the dorsal wall of one hoof concave while the other is straight or convex?
    and that he goes sore for the first week after shoeing.
    Though this may be something of concern, it is also possible that your horse is reacting to changes in hoof orientation after a trim/reset, or that he has underlying [chronic] sub-clinical issues that are brought to a clinical level when he is trimmed/reset, etc. Or, it could be related to what the farrier is doing and how s/he is doing it. Or, some of the above, none of the above or all of the above.

    Since it appears that he gets sore so easily after a trim/reset, the farrier should evaluate his/her protocol and you should consider giving the horse a NSAID the day before, the day of, and the day after his hooves are trimmed/reset. And, I would also suggest you immediately begin a Durasole application regimen.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,395

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    Note to self- Tip the shoer Thur again.

    Can' t imagine what everyone would think if I posted the insanely low fee my farrier charges. Not to mention he is talented and wicked fast. My old horses stand so well for him cuz he gets the job done before they have a chance to get uncomfortable. I have threaten to adopt him!



  10. #10
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    If the horse is just a pasture pet, why is he wearing shoes?
    Vet recommended he always wear shoes for support. I have no hesitations keeping shoes on him for life just want those shoes applied perfectly.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    Vet recommended he always wear shoes for support. I have no hesitations keeping shoes on him for life just want those shoes applied perfectly.
    Support of/for what?

    Since there are no perfect hooves and no perfect humans [with the exception of myself of course], there will never be a trim/shoes that are 'applied perfectly'.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    If the horse is just a pasture pet, why is he wearing shoes?

    Why not? ie: what has been the response from your farrier?

    Regardless, you should find comfort in the fact that there is no record of any pasture pet dying from having toes that appear 'a little long'

    Very few horses have perfectly matched feet. Often, a skilled farrier can get them to match for a short time. After that, they no longer match. Nor should they. Does your horse perhaps have Long toe-High heel syndrome? Is the dorsal wall of one hoof concave while the other is straight or convex?

    Though this may be something of concern, it is also possible that your horse is reacting to changes in hoof orientation after a trim/reset, or that he has underlying [chronic] sub-clinical issues that are brought to a clinical level when he is trimmed/reset, etc. Or, it could be related to what the farrier is doing and how s/he is doing it. Or, some of the above, none of the above or all of the above.

    Since it appears that he gets sore so easily after a trim/reset, the farrier should evaluate his/her protocol and you should consider giving the horse a NSAID the day before, the day of, and the day after his hooves are trimmed/reset. And, I would also suggest you immediately begin a Durasole application regimen.

    Very true. Interestingly my farrier measured his hoofs immediately after he finished shoeing him and the farrier said right front was 1 inch longer than the the left front. I am not saying this is a farrier problem it may just be the way his feet are. But I asked my farrier how he would feel about shoeing him at the clinic and he said that would be "great" that way he can see the inside of the hoof before I shoe it. My vet has allot of experience working with top farriers when he schooled in Europe and CSU and my vet and farrier have allot of respect for each other. So I think shoeing at the clinic is the best way to make sure all is happy. Also being able to measure how much toe can come off will also be helpful. It is just that I know other farriers are changing allot less and I am struggling to pay off my credit card and feeling that $200 every five weeks or $250 with pads for fronts might be alittle higher than I can realistically budget. I also feel badly at this thought because I appreciate my farrier so changing is tough. Also I feel most of the really excellent farriers are not looking for new clients.



  13. #13
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    Support of/for what?

    Since there are no perfect hooves and no perfect humans [with the exception of myself of course], there will never be a trim/shoes that are 'applied perfectly'.
    Okay perfectly was the wrong term. Correct angles and toes trimmed appropriately. Of course there is no perfect.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NYC=center of the universe
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    I pay $300 for 4 steel shoes. Near NYC, though, so everything is pricey!!

    My navicular pasture puff is now barefoot so he only costs $100. And he's much happier now, sound enough for light work. (He caught his bar shoe in turnout and was very lame so per the vet, I took the bar shoes off and let him adjust. In my case I was lucky and it worked well for him.)
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,598

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    I pay around $170 for hot shoeing. My horse wears two front natural balance steel shoes and no shoes behind. Unfortunately, I can't get a reset out of his front shoes because he always wears the left front out at the toe. Sigh. He is high/low...with him it seems to be a "grazing foot" issue...the low one (left) is ALWAYS forward. Always. Anyway, his feet do not match...really at all. I used to really fret about the way he was wearing his shoes and the non-matching, but I have had plenty of vets look at him for the issue, had him chiropracted, etc., and everyone feels he is sound. He is sound and jumping...so I don't worry about his non-matching feet so much. He seems to like his feet the way they are - imperfect and mismatched. The one time we tried to switch his shoeing to keg shoes in front, he did not move nearly as well in front. Not lame, but just not as fluid in front. So, back to the natural balance!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2008
    Location
    Maine
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    1,855

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    $150 for a set of steel shoes with clips and $50/trim. I love my farrier and she is worth every single penny. She always does a great job and is so wonderful with my horses, especially my QH with hind end issues.
    "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,256

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    Remind me to kiss my farrier when I see him next week!

    I pay $45.00 for a trim on my mare

    I pay $90, yes $90, for front steel shoes on my gelding, and he does a fantastic job.


    Recently my farrier did a corrective shoe job on my mare and used aluminum wedge shoes on her fronts. Also packed with Magic Cushion and denture mold, leather pad, then the shoes (which he customized, they were a wedge eggbar, and he cut the back off so its a standard shoe with the wedged heel, and then rasped them to finished shape). That job cost me $160, and he was there for 2 1/2 hours doing just her.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2012
    Posts
    22

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    Wow!!! I couldn't afford that!!!!
    Average price for a trim around here is 30 plus tax and I use two main farriers and one other expert when needed and they are all 30 for trim and between 70 and 90 for fronts only and 120 - 140 for all around shoes. If I get pads there will be a slight extra cost.
    Mary-Anne



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    3,446

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    . . . But the main reason I am contemplating making a change is because I am concerned his toes appear alittle long in which vet agreed . . .
    From what I have gathered thus far from your postings, you should be looking for another vet. This one is ripping you off.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    597

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    $250 for fronts with leather pads, barefoot hinds. Plus the additional ass-kissing that must be performed.

    I do it gladly. My guy is one of those rockstar farriers with a shit-ton of 'tude, but, as others have pointed out, you don't want a farrier whose dance card isn't pretty full. Mine shoes a breathtaking hoof and is worth every penny I pay and every shred of dignity I dump at his feet. His reputation for firing unruly clients keeps us all in line! He once fired a pal of mine just for laughing when he told her his fee. I don't care! I love my farrier and consider myself immensely lucky to be on his client list. Naturally I live in constant fear that he will decide to retire to the private island he has undoubtedly bought with all that shoeing loot.



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