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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,726

    Default How to properly mount your 17.3h horse!

    In case y'all wondered...

    1. Place reins in left hand.
    2. Place left foot in left stirrup.
    3. Don't stop your horse when he sidesteps away, but
    4. Pull yourself up and somehow land behind the saddle.
    5. Be sure your right foot (strapped with a spur) lands near the flank.
    6. Don't get off quickly, but instead try to climb over into the saddle. When you've successfully made it halfway...
    7. Don't let go of the reins when he takes off bucking.

    In all my years on a horse, I know better than this. How in heck I managed to end up behind the saddle is beyond me, but I did get halfway INTO it and managed to stay in the relative vicinity of the saddle for the first two bucks.

    An impressive rodeo horse display ensued. I actually felt the reins snap out of my hand as I was flying through the air!

    Damage: Left hand, left hip, right shin all sore.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2000
    Location
    Near the Itchetucknee.Ft.White Fl.
    Posts
    3,896

    Default

    Glad you are not seriously hurt.

    Below is a pic of my efforts getting on a 14 hh gaited pony.

    I led him up to a park bench and the second I swung my leg over him he turned 90 degrees and jumped the bench.

    I do not know how I stayed on ,but I did.


    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=1&theater
    \"I have lived my life-it is nearly done-.I have played the game all round;But I freely admit that the best of my fun I owe it to Horse and Hound\".



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,309

    Default

    Glad you are okay! This happened to me when trying to get on an OTTB one time. I started to swing my leg over and she bolted; I landed behind the saddle! Then of course she starts bucking. I couldn't get over the cantle because I had chosen to ride in my deep seat dressage saddle that day At some point, I tried to bail and ended up flat on my back. I broke my shoulder in the process. I now try to always use a mounting block.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Listen, I have mounted on the left only to end up on the ground on the right. Some things are just to glamourous.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

    Default

    glad you weren't hurt too bad. I on the other hand know how to dismount a 17.2 hh gelding when he jumps sideways and one rein decided to break (especially when your coach has told you several times to get new reins).

    You land flat on your back - but only if you are wearing a vest.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,425

    Default

    Using a mounting block, put left foot in stirrup and swung my right leg over - then got a muscle spasm and landed in a heap on the right side.

    Right in front of the Joint Masters. Yay for me.

    Put horse in a ditch (out hunting), to remount. Horse jumped out of ditch as I was again, swinging my right leg over. Hilarity ensued. (from what I was told - I was too busy cursing the day the horse was born)

    Oh - and always tighten your own girth. Just sayin'.

    OP - I'm impressed you can mount that behemoth from the ground. I've got a 17.2h horse and I'd probably end up in traction if I tried it.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    Listen, I have mounted on the left only to end up on the ground on the right. Some things are just to glamourous.
    Aw, snoops... it's not glamorous unless someone is around to see it.

    And let me tell you, being the only ENGLISH rider (Eventing? what is THAT?) in a barn full of barrel racers, calf ropers and team penners...falling off your horse before you even get on doesn't help the reputation. There was a nice older gentleman in the arena that asked if I was ok. Then asked if I was SURE I was ok. And then if I needed help with anything, and was I really sure I was OK? As I was trying to get the now-traumatized beast to stand still and spitting out the dirt I ate.

    Add to the list of injuries a sore left (upper) arm, and the most ridiculous looking scrape on my left cheek.

    I was just pleased there wasn't any dirt inside my pants, this time.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2001
    Location
    Colorado, a suburb of Los Angeles
    Posts
    6,660

    Default

    These are great. I always use a mounting block (car bumper, tack trunk, something) as I could not possible get on from the ground. I used a mounting block to get on a friend's minus 15h horse and nearly flung myself off the other side. Also nearly jarred my teeth loose jumping down from the same horse, the ground came up way to fast!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    Aw, snoops... it's not glamorous unless someone is around to see it.

    And let me tell you, being the only ENGLISH rider (Eventing? what is THAT?) in a barn full of barrel racers, calf ropers and team penners...falling off your horse before you even get on doesn't help the reputation. There was a nice older gentleman in the arena that asked if I was ok. Then asked if I was SURE I was ok. And then if I needed help with anything, and was I really sure I was OK? As I was trying to get the now-traumatized beast to stand still and spitting out the dirt I ate.

    Add to the list of injuries a sore left (upper) arm, and the most ridiculous looking scrape on my left cheek.

    I was just pleased there wasn't any dirt inside my pants, this time.

    Oh it was seen...very much seen.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,726

    Default

    Did I mention last night also happened to be the first time I've ridden in a saddle since... mid June?

    Yes. Heinz rides for three months with no saddle and stays on just fine. Saddle comes out, and I fall off.


    I went back to the bareback pad.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,415

    Default Bareback variation...

    As far as I knew horse had never been ridden bareback.
    Only one way to find out if he will cooperate.

    *Place 17h+ horse next to too-short (2-step) mounting block.

    *Rider-of-a-certain-age attempts to gracefully bellyover first to make sure there is an Escape Route.
    Thanks gods there is noone else in the arena.

    *No major reaction, so Grace is thrown to the winds & I scramble onboard.

    *Horse - who has stood rock-solid for the above, Bless his heart - now begins to vibrate beneath me & teleports himself 3' to the right.
    I deposit myself in the sand 3' to the left & about 5' down.

    This was 5 years ago & my beloved Cash did let me ride bareback after this initial sortie.

    Now I have Sam - also 17h+ - and being just that much older, I have yet to road-test his barebackability.

    At least not without someone else to:
    A) hold him
    B) dial 911
    It's a loooooooooooooong way down.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2003
    Location
    Happily in Canada
    Posts
    4,792

    Default

    Snoopy, you'll love this one. I was working at Bill Smith's yard in England, a mix of racehorses, field and show hunters. I had to exercise a middle-weight hunter that was all of 17.3hh (I couldn't believe this qualified as "middle-weight") and had to ride him in a double bridle as they thought I would be too small to control him (5'3"). Generally I got a leg up or found a mounting block, but one day I was told to bring him to the outdoor manege as someone was coming to look at him... that someone being David Tatlow. There was no mounting block there! I thought it would be pretty undignified to sidle him up to the fence, climb the fence and get on, so I got on from the ground... a very long way! I managed to keep it from looking too unglamourous, thankfully!

    Since then I have neither ridden a horse so big, nor felt the need to prove (again) that I can get on from the ground!
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2010
    Posts
    202

    Default

    Ouchy! Glad you are in good spirits and not more injured!!!! (And thanks for the laughs...these stories make me feel much better about my attempts to mount my 17.2 horse without a mounting block-note that I say "attempts" because none of them have ever been successful hehe)



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2008
    Location
    northeast
    Posts
    157

    Default me= short, horse= 17.3

    Align horse with mobile home steps that serve as mounting block.

    Still reach UPPPP for stirrup.

    Take highest "short" ladder with me for "al fresco" mounts.

    Never, never fall off, much less "get off" before absolutely necessary.

    Long term project- teach horse to bow ( thus becoming 14 hands at withers)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,623

    Default

    Thanks for the PSA as I look forward to getting my 17.1 mare back from Mom duty
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    2,244

    Default

    Just to save someone else from this embarrasment - it is NOT a good idea to routinely use an upside down empty muck bucket for your mounting block -

    It may seem a good idea for awhile, but at some point the plastic on the bottom of the muck bucket declares it was not designed for this kind of stress, so it gives out and you end up standing beside your horse with one leg wearing a muck bucket - and of course it will happen at something like an event with lot's of your idols riding by.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,453

    Default

    Just a PSA along these lines: never, no matter your agility or the horse's general trustworthiness, attempt to mount a steed of such proportions in the hunt field without someone holding said horse's bridle...particularly if you stopped to help an injured rider and the rest of the field has left the vicinity.

    Otherwise you may (just hypothetically) end up returning to consciousness while getting the 2nd CAT scan of the day.

    Just sayin'. Apparently even trustworthy horses don't think much of being used for rock-climbing practice in such conditions.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blugal View Post
    Snoopy, you'll love this one. I was working at Bill Smith's yard in England, a mix of racehorses, field and show hunters. I had to exercise a middle-weight hunter that was all of 17.3hh (I couldn't believe this qualified as "middle-weight") and had to ride him in a double bridle as they thought I would be too small to control him (5'3"). Generally I got a leg up or found a mounting block, but one day I was told to bring him to the outdoor manege as someone was coming to look at him... that someone being David Tatlow. There was no mounting block there! I thought it would be pretty undignified to sidle him up to the fence, climb the fence and get on, so I got on from the ground... a very long way! I managed to keep it from looking too unglamourous, thankfully!

    Since then I have neither ridden a horse so big, nor felt the need to prove (again) that I can get on from the ground!



    You must admit that some of the funniest moments to do with horses is mounting. I have wet myself laughing watching people mount...on many occasions. It can be very funny.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    2,244

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    You must admit that some of the funniest moments to do with horses is mounting. I have wet myself laughing watching people mount...on many occasions. It can be very funny.
    I attended college at Randolph-Macon Woman's College in VA, (when it was still a woman's college!) and we had a lovely mounting area with 4 nice solid blocks that we used to get on comfortably every day.

    One day, in preparation for hosting intercollegiates the next day, we found to our surprise that all the blocks had been moved to the lower ring.

    Oh the horror! Watch a dozen supposedly skilled riders look in dismay at their humungous mounts. Our instructor was NOT impressed, and refused to let us walk the horses down to the arena to start the lesson -

    OMG that was a disaster! Some girls seemed to forget entirely how to mount from the ground. Such an epic struggle it was Merciless instructor started leading group down the trail while several students were only partly on - one clung to the side of her horse half way down the hill.

    (Note these were in the days that full blinged out chaps were cool, so that made mounting from the ground even harder!)

    I was fortunate to have one of the shortest mounts - I'd often longed to be on one of the huge TB's in the barn but that day I was quite happy with my little Appy!

    Thanks for bringing up the memory



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    848

    Default

    My favorite mounting story is when I was a kid. I had my left foot up in the stirrup and the horse (something tall) stepped on my right foot. I couldn't get enough leverage to push the horse off my foot, or to get my left foot back out of the stirrup. Since the footing was soft I just let myself fall back into it, stood up, pushed the horse off my foot, and got on.

    To this day I have no idea why I didn't just call "Help" across the arena. I suspect I may have and no one heard me, since I was basically yelling into the horse's side
    Last edited by Desert Topaz; Sep. 1, 2011 at 08:58 PM. Reason: Confused my feet



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