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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    353

    Default unwanted dog advice?

    How do you deal with people like this? It totally irritates me but I say nothing and walk away.

    Some woman told me my scottie needed to lose weight in his neck? haha. Or that my other scottie was the "pack leader" as he barked at another dog in the distance.(he was quiet after I called him)...Or people who offer unwelcomed "training" advice while their dog is humping and fighting all the other dogs in the park..haha


    What kind of person is confident enough to go up to strangers and make these types of comments? it kinda blows my mind a bit. But I just smile and nod and walk away.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2011
    Posts
    1,192

    Default

    It's probably the same type of person that gives unsolicited horse or child rearing advice.

    I usually just say "interesting" and then nod a couple of times. They're placated and I don't make enemies.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Generally I say, "I'll have to think about that."
    I'd like to know how to get a dog to lose weight in just the neck, though. I'd have probably asked out of curiosity.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    353

    Default

    i know, right? she was fairly overweight herself as was her dog. She was the kind of person who seemed to be a hypocritical expert on EVERYTHING...It was bit entertaining.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    Those kinds of people used to intimidate me -or at least catch me so unawares that I couldn't respond. Now that I'm older and bitchier I take one of two tacks depending on my mood.

    1. Laugh at them and tell them they're full of crap. There is a person at my barn who fancies himself a horse whisperer and gives the most ridiculous advice to people. He told me once that if on the trail my horse is afraid of something that I should let him back up and try it again. I laughed and said something like, "Imagine a line of cavalry horses in battle all backing up because they were afraid of cannon fire, or bushes, or rattling sabers".

    2. I completely screw with their minds. For example, if someone said to me, as to the OP, that my dog was too fat in the neck I'd say, "Yeah we do that on purpose because he's just a bait dog and the corsos can get a better grip on his neck if it's fat".


    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    353

    Default

    haha Paula you made me laugh!!! I should say that about my big scottie. imagine the looks....can you imagine my saying this the owner of a doberman?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorsefaceDee View Post
    What kind of person is confident enough to go up to strangers and make these types of comments? it kinda blows my mind a bit. But I just smile and nod and walk away.
    Well, people get up in other people's animal management business all the time here. That seems to be socially acceptable. I'm pretty sure it's a greater waste of time than talking to the animal owner in person.

    If you

    1. Walk around with a little bit of chutzpah showing

    and

    2. Manage your animal well

    people generally leave you alone.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2000
    Location
    Vermont, USA
    Posts
    1,443

    Default

    I don't really like to get into it with people who I know already have opinions formed (which is pretty much anyone who comes at you like that), so I generally just smile at my dog and say something like "We'll see about that!" or "I don't know, I think you are pretty perfect anyway!" and just walk away. I'm almost always up for a genuine discussion, but those aren't the kind of people who are fun to talk to.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,484

    Default

    Refreshing response here on COTH. In real life, I think this response tactfully tells the busybody the exchange is over. I like this.

    Quote Originally Posted by BostonBanker View Post
    I don't really like to get into it with people who I know already have opinions formed (which is pretty much anyone who comes at you like that), so I generally just smile at my dog and say something like "We'll see about that!" or "I don't know, I think you are pretty perfect anyway!" and just walk away. I'm almost always up for a genuine discussion, but those aren't the kind of people who are fun to talk to.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2003
    Location
    Kansas City, KS
    Posts
    270

    Default

    Just say "thanks for your input" and keep walking on by them. No reason to get all bent out of shape for nosy know-it-all people.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2013
    Posts
    378

    Default

    I had a petsitter recently who came to my house to apparently "save" my animals from my ignorance. She said to one of my neighbors: "Her horses look terrible." She said to me: "The flymasks are too tight". "It's expensive to keep an old horse, you should put them down."

    She moved all my stuff to where she thought it should go. I've yet to find some of it.

    Being spiteful, I was pleased to learn that she was stung by wasps while "fixing" my arrangement of bandages when she stuck her hand where it had no business being. (Of course that was all my fault.)

    Do you think I should have her back?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2008
    Location
    The beautiful midwest
    Posts
    764

    Default

    I find the older I get the less my "filter" button works. I just come back at people, claws out. What the heck, I have all the friends I need, don't really worry about some stranger not liking me. I've always gotten cheesed off when somebody makes a disparaging remark about one of my animals.
    Lilykoi


    Hell hath no fury like the chestnut thoroughbred mare



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,459

    Default

    I have no problem with it at all. Some times the advice is useful, other times it is less useful. However, the people who have the boldness to speak out are often the only ones bold enough to walk up to someone incorrectly using a halti lead, physical reprimanding their dog, etc. If someone says something that is dangerously incorrect I try to spend a minute educating but I never go off on someone.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Those kinds of people used to intimidate me -or at least catch me so unawares that I couldn't respond. Now that I'm older and bitchier I take one of two tacks depending on my mood.

    1. Laugh at them and tell them they're full of crap. There is a person at my barn who fancies himself a horse whisperer and gives the most ridiculous advice to people. He told me once that if on the trail my horse is afraid of something that I should let him back up and try it again. I laughed and said something like, "Imagine a line of cavalry horses in battle all backing up because they were afraid of cannon fire, or bushes, or rattling sabers".

    2. I completely screw with their minds. For example, if someone said to me, as to the OP, that my dog was too fat in the neck I'd say, "Yeah we do that on purpose because he's just a bait dog and the corsos can get a better grip on his neck if it's fat".


    Paula
    Oh option #2 for sure.
    I like my men like my tea: hot, strong, sweet and British!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    It's all this guy's fault.

    Purina diet

    I have a Golden retriever & I was buying a large bag of Purina at Wal-Mart and was in line to check out.

    A woman behind me asked if I had a dog. On impulse, I told her that no, I was starting The Purina Diet again, although I probably shouldn' t because I' d ended up in the hospital last time, but that I' d lost 50 pounds before I awakened in an intensive care ward with tubes coming out of most of my orifices and IVs in both arms.

    I told her that it was essentially a perfect diet and that the way that it works is to load your pants pockets with Purina nuggets and simply eat one or two every time you feel hungry & that the food is nutritionally complete so I was going to try it again. I have to mention here that practically everyone in the line was by now enthralled with my story, particularly a guy who was behind her. Horrified, she asked if I 'd ended up in the hospital in that condition because I had been poisoned. I told her no; it was because I ' d been sitting in the street licking my balls and a car hit me.

    I thought one guy was going to have a heart attack he was laughing so hard as he staggered out the door

    http://www.funny.com/cgi-bin/WebObje...es=Purina_diet

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,794

    Default

    Honestly, if it's just conversation, I'd just chalk it up to a slightly aggressive way to connect. I have a dog, she has a dog, let's talk about the dogs. Throw in a bit of ape-brain, aka "I will establish my dominance quickly with my impressive store of knowledge about dog neck-fat."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    353

    Default

    I feel like there are always those types of owners who hang out at dogs parks who feel they know everything and feel the need to prove it to you. Even though their dog is usually an a$$hole.



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