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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2010
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    319

    Default Best time to buy?

    I'm trying to decide when to think about buying my next horse. I don't need one right now as I'm leasing a competition horse and have other horses available to me for riding. I was tentatively planning to buy something sometime next year, but there are a few tempting horses currently on the market...and I feel like leasing a horse could quickly end up being more expensive that buying one. I'm really torn because I love the horse I'm leasing, but the no equity thing is starting to get to me.

    In terms of buying, would you say the selection is generally better in fall (in order to sell the horse before winter) or in spring?



  2. #2
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    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
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    Default

    PrinceSheik325....you have posted this same or similiar topic a few times.....the time is right when you have the funds and you see a horse you like.. it has nothing to do with weather....



  3. #3
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by judybigredpony View Post
    PrinceSheik325....you have posted this same or similiar topic a few times.....the time is right when you have the funds and you see a horse you like.. it has nothing to do with weather....
    I'd add... sometime after you stop thinking of owning a horse as equity. I promise you, unless you're one of the lucky few, they are money dumps, not equity...
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  4. #4
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    Default

    For me, personally, with a 10 year old dressage horse and looking "sometime in the next few years" for a younger horse to have coming up behind him... it was when I had the money and when the situation was such I felt I would regret NOT buying that specific horse. But could manage to take the risk that I never even got her under saddle, horses being horses and enjoying finding new ways to injure themselves all the time.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2010
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Thanks for calling me out, Judy! :-)

    I know, I know...I just need to commit. But, this isn't an easy decision! It took me a year and a half to find a car that met all my specifications - imagine how long it may take me to find a horse! I just want to make sure I give myself every opportunity to find a great horse, including knowing when most sellers are looking to sell (in hunterland, it used to be the fall).



  6. #6
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    May. 10, 2010
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    319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    I'd add... sometime after you stop thinking of owning a horse as equity. I promise you, unless you're one of the lucky few, they are money dumps, not equity...
    Trust me, I know all about this with my retiree. At least with buying a horse, though, you do get the opportunity to make some of your money back. With leasing a horse, I feel like I'm throwing money at the great abyss.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    Default

    I was watching my new girl since she was a few months old - about two years. I looked and looked, and nothing else I saw caught my attention like she did. I actually didn't mean to get a young horse quite yet, but the breeder has been marketing her horses more to get them moved and when it came down to it, missing out on this girl just wasn't a chance I wanted to take.

    I think outside of hunter land you're going to see horses available at all different kinds of times of the year, with a large variety. If you're looking OTTB, toward the end of a season of course, but otherwise it may depend on geography (if you're in an area where horses are turned out/given off all winter, they may want to sell beforehand) but it's really when the right horse comes along.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
    Posts
    1,961

    Default Random thoughts . . .

    Best time is (a) when you don't NEED to buy, you still have something acceptable to ride and (b) you have the funds and can do it without strain.

    My old teacher would say, "Looking? You should ALWAYS be looking!"

    Here's why: 3 weeks ago one of my mainstays, the sweet, safe twentysomething but sound guy I could put anyone on and take anywhere blindsided me when Nature called his number unexpectedly. He was a gray, and the vet said the likely cause was a melanoma. In addition to missing him terribly, this leaves a huge, yawning gap in my barn--he was one of the most useful horses I had.

    So, I went looking . . . and bought a Long-Term Project, wee weanling as we speak, with the type and size and bloodlines to replace the dearly departed. Financially, this made great sense. But I won't be riding her for 4 years!

    Best advice is: Get what you WANT when you find it, so you're not forced at some point to "settle." The ones you buy to be sensible eat as much as the ones you're passionate about. Actually, BEST advice is to be passionate AND sensible!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
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    Default

    The best time to look is before you really need one.

    Some of the best horses found me when I didn't know I was looking.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
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    Default

    There will always be people that need to sell and hence a bargain. You're past the off to college deals and in time for those looking at hay prices they can't afford. There are always divorces, illness, death and lay-offs. Always look and if the funds and time are there start test driving.
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
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    Default

    Always look and if the funds and time are there start test driving.
    Thats the key don't start calling and looking unless you are 100% prepared to commit if/when the right horse appears....

    Around here we got lottsa hay same prices as last few years, feed well its up n down mostly up w/ corn prices.
    And re-sale projects off the track well go look the really nice stuff is getting pricier and pricier which means the prices after being re-started go up.....Most people cleaned their closests and got leaner and meaner a while ago and the rest of us got smarter.....the fire sale deals are fewer and farther apart.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2003
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    Happily in Canada
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    Default

    In addition to what everyone else has said:

    -a lease generally gives you the security of not risking a total loss or major vet bill (depending of course on your specific lease agreement).

    -there is not one "right" horse for you out there. When you find one you like (or it finds you), make it the right choice by treating that horse as the individual it is, and not comparing it against some ideal you were hoping to find.
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PrinceSheik325 View Post
    Thanks for calling me out, Judy! :-)

    I know, I know...I just need to commit. But, this isn't an easy decision! It took me a year and a half to find a car that met all my specifications - imagine how long it may take me to find a horse! I just want to make sure I give myself every opportunity to find a great horse, including knowing when most sellers are looking to sell (in hunterland, it used to be the fall).
    Stop looking for perfection. You will be a happier person

    But really. Quit looking for your dream horse. Look for your next experience. You will learn something from every horse.

    There are so many great project horses out there. And each one will make you a better horseman.



    Personally, I look for fun. And when I decide I want another.... I can find 3-5 for less than 5k that I would vet and know I would enjoy bringing along in less than two weeks. Will I keep at horse forever...no idea. Some I have and others sold on but I enjoyed them all.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    Stop looking for perfection. You will be a happier person

    But really. Quit looking for your dream horse. Look for your next experience. You will learn something from every horse.
    So true!
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2004
    Location
    ocala,florida....the place to be!
    Posts
    3,059

    Default

    if you are looking in hunter land, this is the wrong time of year, everyone is heading south and prices are about to double.
    www.camaloufarms.com

    ride it like you stole it! "ralph hill"



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2006
    Location
    Nashville, TN
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    Default

    Leasing is a way better deal than buying. There's no equity in a horse you own as it may die tomorrow or (worse) go suddenly and inexplicably lame, requiring you to pour money into vet work and then retire it at age ___ and pay it's board for the rest of it's life as it sits and eats in someone'$ field.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
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    Default

    Personally, I look for fun. And when I decide I want another.... I can find 3-5 for less than 5k that I would vet and know I would enjoy bringing along in less than two weeks.
    Finding horses to buy is never a problem. I own far too many. Luckily, I am able to lease most of them to people who truly appreciate them and I get the enjoyment of watching my horses go. I very rarely make any money selling those that I do (in part because I pay board and so it takes very little time for me to have a lot into the horse). The only reason to buy rather than lease is if you can't find a lease horse that works for you (sounds like you don't have that problem), the owner won't let you do what you want to with the horse (such as event above training or whatever, but sounds like you don't have that problem either) or you are worried about having too much of a bond and then having the horse sold out from under you. If you have a lease horse you really enjoy, that is a great situation. On the other hand, if you want to be enabled, let me know and I'll point you at the 15-20 I would buy next week if I were not on a no.more.horses! plan.
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    1,333

    Default

    I like buying now, during the fall. Gives you the whole winter to break, get more broke, or fix whatever you bought so the horse is ready to go by spring. Just think, if you are looking to buy off the track, by late spring the horse will be ready to go BN (barring any unforeseen issues )



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2006
    Posts
    2,398

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by horsetales View Post
    There will always be people that need to sell and hence a bargain. You're past the off to college deals and in time for those looking at hay prices they can't afford. There are always divorces, illness, death and lay-offs. Always look and if the funds and time are there start test driving.
    You should write children's books.
    Shut up! You look fine! --Judybigredpony
    Ms. Brazil



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
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    Default

    It took me a year and a half to find a car that met all my specifications - imagine how long it may take me to find a horse!
    Thats kinda scary..its a vehicle you decide what you can afford what gets the job done the bells n whistles you want narrow to color and wait for a sale!!! 90 days tops.It doesn't have emotion , a beating heart and eyes. Don't get me wrong I love my truck but it took me 2 weeks tops to get color on the engine size I required w/ seating material I prefered. 1 day of test driving and haggling between 2 dealerships to get pricing.

    You are going to have a hard time buying a horse if a vehicle took that much effort.



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