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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
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    14

    Default Would it be worth it? *Advice needed*

    I am probably moving to Virginia (around Charlottesville) from the UK at some point next year and I am wondering if it is worth it to bring my horse or to sell him and buy another one once I have moved...

    I am awaiting a quote from an equine logistics company to fly/transport him from Hampshire UK to Charlottesville so will wait to get that back to give me a better idea but I also need to know how much it would cost to buy a similar horse in that area. This where I need your help as I have no idea what he is worth in the american market. Please help .

    He is a 16.1hh 7yr old Chestnut TB Gelding.
    Good to box, clip, shoe, traffic, vet, dentist ect. Very easy and laidback. Excellent hack alone and in company, nice and safe . He's trained in dressage, showjumping, showing and XC. He has won pure dressage at Prelim and Novice level here in the UK and has some British Dressage points (points at registered competition) (not sure what level that is in America?). It is the level that has lengthened strides, counter canter, rein back but not lateral work.. level 2?
    He is trained in lateral work at home and walk to canter.

    He has evented at 80cm and 90cm level, always gone clear XC, he's brave and will jump anything. He has never had more than one pole down SJ. Dressage in the early 30's at the events (65/68%). He has competed on the Riding Club teams at dressage and showjumping, came 6th showjumping at the national area riding club qualifiers. Was 3rd showjumping with a fast double clear last time out at 90cm.
    I have jumped him 1m20cm at home which he jumped like it was 2ft but I am not brave enough to jump that big at a competition as I am 30 now and a wimp.
    He's been placed reguarly top 3 at showing in riding horse classes qualifying for the amature showing championships last year. He's seen hounds. He's taken part in lots of training clinics and shows.
    As you can see although I don't compete him at a high level he's a really nice useful fun horse. Theres only two times this year that he hasn't come home from a competiton without a ribbon. I have put a lot of effort into making him such a consistent allrounder and I am a bit reluctant to have to start over again! Also I love him of course .

    However it is silly moving him if it costs $10,000 and he is worth $2000!

    Here is a picture to help. He's a good quality TB, lovely mover, all the people that meet him think he is a WB!

    http://sphotos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphoto...03871470_n.jpg

    Please can I have some advice on how much I would have to pay to buy a similar horse in America, Virginia.

    Many Thanks

    GM



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
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    Default

    I have friend who moved here from the UK and left her horse behind and regretted it. From the way you describe your horse my vote would be to bring him. You can pick up TBs pretty cheap here but then there are always so many questions, even if you vet them things can come up later. I know someone who just bought their dream OTTB and turns out the horse has back issues that would not turn up on regular vetting and now the horse is a walk/trail horse only.

    To me the horse you describe is worth more than $10,000 over here, quite a bit more. Also love your horse, adorable! If shipping is under $15,000 I would definitely go for it.

    Look at this website for horses for sale in Va and see what you think.
    Good luck!!

    http://www.equine.com/index.html



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
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    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bizbachfan View Post
    I have friend who moved here from the UK and left her horse behind and regretted it. From the way you describe your horse my vote would be to bring him. You can pick up TBs pretty cheap here but then there are always so many questions, even if you vet them things can come up later. I know someone who just bought their dream OTTB and turns out the horse has back issues that would not turn up on regular vetting and now the horse is a walk/trail horse only.

    To me the horse you describe is worth more than $10,000 over here, quite a bit more. Also love your horse, adorable! If shipping is under $15,000 I would definitely go for it.

    Look at this website for horses for sale in Va and see what you think.
    Good luck!!

    http://www.equine.com/index.html
    That's helpful thank you! I think that is why I am so keen to bring him, buying a horse is such a lottery. Those figures are really great and will help me to persude my husband that it is the right thing to do. .



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    12,861

    Default

    Bring him. Just on your description and his picture, you may have a hard time finding a replacement for him for less than 10-15k (that is at the same level). He sounds certainly worth more than 2K!

    So unless you can sell him for a substantial amount (i.e. more than 30k), I would bring him. (and the pain in the a$$ costs of horse shopping would probably have me bringing him anyway!)

    Shipping should be less than 10K.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2006
    Location
    Durham NC
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Your horse would be very expensive on the East Coast of the United States. People pay for training. So bring him with you. I wish I could live in Charlottesville it is such a lovely area.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2002
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    1,012

    Default

    I say bring him.I think it would easily cost you 20k to replace him.The agony of finding the right horse is worth quite a bit as well.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
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    31,782

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    If you have the money to put him on a plane to Newark NJ, a days quarantine and another day or two to van him to Charlottesville? I'd bring him.

    But it is expensive for many people, guessing, worst case, about 8k pounds, 10kusd. when you figure in the vet costs with the transportation. Could be less if they can put with an already scheduled, large load for both the flight and the van ride.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
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    4,117

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    He is worth substancially more than the cost of the flight...BUT here are things you have to consider.
    How will he handle the hot humid summer conditiond? When we go thru very dry droughts how will his feet hold up to the bone jarring hard going. The short but occassiona bitter cold winters?I lived in Yorkshire and Sussex UK what you consider hard footing is no where near what we can get and the summers are just brutal some years, the winters go from mild to freaky Artic w/ ice storms 5ft snow or nothing like last winter.
    Yes people import horses all the time, but the climate and conditions are what is very hard on some. More frequantly than you will realize.
    Is he a good easy doer and won't get upset by the higher quality of hay and totally diffrent feeds we use?

    Depending on what you can get for him there and what that money can buy you here...look @ Sports Horse Nation.
    I am going to PM.........



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
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    14

    Default

    Thanks I did warn my husband it would be around $10,000 probably... it is a lot and that is why he is wanting to make sure we can't just buy another one. I can see his point... for all I know we could bring my horse and then he could go lame!
    I know and trust my horse though and he is a very good horse, it's taken me years to find him!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenMonkey View Post
    Thanks I did warn my husband it would be around $10,000 probably... it is a lot and that is why he is wanting to make sure we can't just buy another one. I can see his point... for all I know we could bring my horse and then he could go lame!
    I know and trust my horse though and he is a very good horse, it's taken me years to find him!

    Well you are right any horse can go lame but...I say a solid young healthy horse like yours is worth the transport cost. Of course you could consider how much you could sell him there, I have no idea of the UK market. If you could get $25,000 USD maybe worth considering but horse shopping is very difficult even with the bad economy finding the right horse to replace him could be a long process, and it already took you years to find him.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2012
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    481

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenMonkey View Post
    Thanks I did warn my husband it would be around $10,000 probably... it is a lot and that is why he is wanting to make sure we can't just buy another one. I can see his point... for all I know we could bring my horse and then he could go lame!
    I know and trust my horse though and he is a very good horse, it's taken me years to find him!
    I would bring him. A horse like that is going to cost 15-20k here and finding one you like and is sound is not easy. Shipping will most likely cost you 5-8k depending on how many horses are going at the time and how long your horse is in quarantine. The time in quarantine can be very expensive if they get a false positive and will prolong the amount of time your horse is there. And you have to pay for that time which is really expensive. I would contact multiple shipping companies that are reputable and get multiple quotes so you have an actual cost. Some are going to be more than others. Make sure the horse gets hay and water during the trip. Some will charge you extra.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2012
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    14

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    Quote Originally Posted by judybigredpony View Post
    He is worth substancially more than the cost of the flight...BUT here are things you have to consider.
    How will he handle the hot humid summer conditiond? When we go thru very dry droughts how will his feet hold up to the bone jarring hard going. The short but occassiona bitter cold winters?I lived in Yorkshire and Sussex UK what you consider hard footing is no where near what we can get and the summers are just brutal some years, the winters go from mild to freaky Artic w/ ice storms 5ft snow or nothing like last winter.
    Yes people import horses all the time, but the climate and conditions are what is very hard on some. More frequantly than you will realize.
    Is he a good easy doer and won't get upset by the higher quality of hay and totally diffrent feeds we use?

    Depending on what you can get for him there and what that money can buy you here...look @ Sports Horse Nation.
    I am going to PM.........
    He doesn't like it too hot. I bring him in during the day in the summer here out of the flys and I would definitly do the same. He has good feet, i'm not too worried about that. I wouldn't ride him out of a walk or trot on hard ground and would probably work him in an arena and only in early mornings. It gets hard here sometimes as we have clay ground where we are and it can be like concrete, i'd keep his field rolled and flat so it's not rutty.
    The snow he will be OK with, he likes snow and if its icy or too deep i'll keep him in.
    I was worried about feed. The grass where he is kept now is cattle grass and it is so rich, another reason why I bring him in during the summer is to get him off the lush grass. He only really has hay and chaff as hard feed as he is a good doer. If the hay is good quality that would help as more reason not to give a bucket feed.
    I wouldn't want to upset him or make him sick with colic, i'd never forgive myself... he's quite tough though. He's not a sensitive horse in terms of temprement, he's quite relaxed and confident so I don't think he would be stressed by the actuall move. Its just the change of diet and heat that are the only things I would watch and would be worried about. I think he would get used to it. Id probably have to go and see some yards and vets and get their advice if I was going to bring him.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    But, OP, if the 10k to get him here is a financial hardship for you? Or flat out of the question?

    We have lots of horses over here and it's not impossible to get something pretty decent for whatever he sells for over there plus what you can save when you aren't paying to board one out for a bit.

    And somebody over there will love him and what you have done for him.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2004
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    2,642

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    I suspect that financially it is more efficient to sell him there, and use that money plus your shipping budget to buy something here.

    But since when do we make any horse decisions based on financial efficiency? If you love him and want to have him here and can afford it, it is probably worth the money.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
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    we typically don't roll our paddocks...if you are going to be boarding here you might want to start there before you decide to bring him.

    Geldings don't get much of a quarenteen either unlike mares or stallions.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
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    1,787

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    If I was moving overseas, I'd bring my horse if at all possible. My Arab isn't worth a heck of a lot to anyone else, but he's worth his weight in gold to me. He's young, he's everything I want in a horse and he's adaptable. I'd take him I a heartbeat even though it would cost more than he's worth.

    I think it depends how attached to this horse you are. I have absolutely no doubt you could find a replacement with a similar skill set and temperament. Especially if you have some patience and the ability to travel a bit (prices on the coasts are much higher than in the Midwest).

    If he's everything you want in a horse and you'd miss him terribly, bring him. If you'd be sad, but okay with replacing him then sell him and buy a new horse over here.

    I would guess it would be cheaper to bring your guy. Especially if you're goin to be horse shopping on the east coast.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    He sounds and looks like a lovely dude. If you are financially able to ship him, I think you'd be better off bringing him with you than selling him and shopping for a new one. I know that if were to move to the UK, I would do everything possible to take my guy with me (of course, that would be the whole point, but that's another discussion).



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
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    5,170

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    I suspect at the end of the day one of the key pieces is what you could sell your horse for in the UK. From what you've said, your guy looks like a lovely horse who would be easily sellable in the UK for decent but not crazy money. If that's the case, then for the price you sell him for there, plus the 10K or so it would cost to bring him over here, you're going to be able to find another nice Training/Preliminary horse. There are a lot of quite nice horses right now who are sitting on the market, and you'd have a wide scope of options, particularly as the fall season goes on.

    But, if you'd only be able to sell him for a couple of grand, you're not going to find one here with the same experience in the same range, so perversely, it's likely more cost effective to bring him over. Alternately, if he's so special that he'd be worth a ton in the UK or if he's significantly irreplaceable to you, then you figure out how to make it work to ship him over, because the cost of replacing him is so high.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2001
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    4,710

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    I think Judybigredpony is being a bit dramatic. We are in NoVA, moved here from the wet/cold Pacific Northwest. Our horses adapted just fine, as do the hundreds or thousands of horses that are imported from the UK and Europe every year.

    Yes, it gets hot and humid, but as soon as the weather turns for warm and buggy, horses go on night time turnout and are in under fans during the day. Either ride early or very late. If your horse tends to keep a lot of coat in the summer, body clip, problem solved.

    In the winter, it can range from relatively mild to cold in the high teens/low 20s at night. Simple to manage if you clip them and then rug up for the temperature. When it does ice, no one goes outside, but if you have an indoor they can get lunged/free lunged, or hand-walked in barn aisles.

    The hard ground in summer is only an issue if you don't have an arena, and it doesn't happen every summer. We did most of our work in the arena this past summer, then hacked out through the fields at a walk for a post-work cool out.

    It is really all quite manageable.

    From what you've said (and your photo) you could definitely not replace your horse for the $10k it would cost to ship. Horses on the east coast that are quiet, pretty, good movers and good jumpers are expensive. You can pick something up off the track for cheap, but it is always a crapshoot and may take years to get where you are now.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    I find the British isle and European horses handle the importation to the US FAR FAR better than the freaking southern hemisphere horses do. They completely fall apart, both physically and mentally, more times than not. Most English, Irish, and European horses come over and adapt quickly, and are often out and about within a few weeks. The trip is also quite easy on most of them.

    I guess another thing to consider is how attached you are to him. We're all fond of our horses, but there have definitely been horses I would have sold to move on. I would not sell my current one, though. He is worth the expense of moving.

    Another thing to consider is he might be worth more HERE, once he's here, than over in the UK...there's a reason we all come and shop!



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