The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2009
    Location
    Garden Prairie, Illinois
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    Yes really, you can pull them with a sedan. I did it for four years, with 168 horsepower and a 103" wheelbase. When that car died of old age at nearly 200K miles, I started pulling with a Toyota RAV4 AWD with V6 engine (which, let's face it, is a glorified car trying to look like an SUV). The RAV4 gets 268 hp and is way, way more power than I need.
    Another Brenderup owner/lover here. And like jn4jenny, I used a Volvo Sedan to haul my Solo around IL/WI events and schooling shows. I made it to 278K miles with the sedan before buying another Volvo.

    My car/trailer have been used numerous time to haul furniture, riding lawn mowers, etc. I actually had my BIL try to MAKE the car/trailer fishtail by driving side to side on an empty country road. COULD NOT GET IT TO FISHTAIL!

    This was a short trailer driving lesson, along with panic stops, and U-turns lock to lock on the steering wheel. All to show how stable and reliable the car with Brenderup were to handle, before I loaned it to my relatives for moving furniture....
    Inese



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,773

    Default

    How does the vehicle towing capacity work into this? I have a hard time believing a sedan has enough towing capacity for a trailer and horse.... yet they tow BU and horse just fine? (oh, one or two horse BU?)

    L



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,800

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lorilu View Post
    How does the vehicle towing capacity work into this? I have a hard time believing a sedan has enough towing capacity for a trailer and horse.... yet they tow BU and horse just fine? (oh, one or two horse BU?)

    L
    For a 2-horse model you're far better off with at least 5000-7500 lbs of tow capacity, and I can't name a single sedan that passes that muster. But for the Solo and the Prestige 2-horse, some sedans and "cute utes" with 2500 to 4000 lbs of tow capacity might work. It just depends on who you are, how much crap you put in your trailer and tow vehicle, how much your horse weighs, etc.

    You'll notice that so far, everyone piping up about pulling with a sedan is pulling the Solo one-horse model. That weighs 1350 lbs, although mine weighs 1400 once you account for shavings and weigh it on a wet rainy day (yes, I've put it on a truck scale in those conditions). My horse weighs 1050 lbs. That's 2450 lbs total. My Subaru had a tow capacity of 2700 lbs. My RAV4 has a tow capacity of 3500 lbs.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2009
    Location
    Garden Prairie, Illinois
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lorilu View Post
    How does the vehicle towing capacity work into this? I have a hard time believing a sedan has enough towing capacity for a trailer and horse.... yet they tow BU and horse just fine?
    My S70 (and subsequent S80) Volvo sedans had a tow capacity of 3,500 lbs. I tow a 1 horse Solo Brenderup in the flatlands of Illinois and Wisconsin.

    I now own a Volvo XC90 SUV with a tow capacity of 5,000 lbs. Same horse, same amount of crap in my vehicle. Feels less noticeable, still stops the same way, due to the trailer brakes.

    Keep in mind, I used to own and tow a 14' steel stock trailer, and then a 2 horse Merhow with dressing room (steel). They felt 'heavy' and scary to stop in an emergency with a V8 van built on a longer wheelbase than my car....

    I decided the economics of 2 vehicles was 2X expensive for me (a single gal), so I started looking for a way to commute daily to my office 45 miles away, yet tow occassionally. The Volvo/Brenderup combination has worked wonderfully for me for almost 10 years!
    Last edited by Inese; Oct. 7, 2012 at 03:28 PM. Reason: typo
    Inese



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,773

    Default

    thanks! pretty much what I thought!



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2006
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I have a '93 Imperial (like the Baron but a model older) that I purchased about 7 years ago. It is a phenomenal trailer. I pull it with a 4Runner and before that a Liberty, and it hauls beautifully. It is plenty roomy for my OTTB, but I've also had a wide-bodied draft cross AND a 17.3-hand WB in there at the same time.

    I had it overhauled and the floor replaced by a former B'up dealer last year. I found the floor on ebay through a former dealer out west and had it shipped. It cost a bit more, but I didn't have to wait months for the part from Europe. Just get the brakes checked about every year or so, and you should be fine. I have replaced all the tires and had no trouble finding the correct size at my local NTB. I did spend quite a bit for the overhaul, BUT that was the first expense I'd had on the trailer since I purchased it--other than new tires.

    A couple things to remember:
    1. Be sure to clean it out after every use. I sweep and hose off the mats and then roll the mat back and hose out underneath, particularly if my horse pees in the trailer. I leave it folded back until next time I use it so it dries thoroughly. I don't know if the newer models have this, but my mat is split down the center, allowing me to roll back just one side at a time.
    2. Wash and wax at least once a year, twice if possible (once at beginning and end of season).
    3. When storing, use a block under the chock and make sure it's tilted a little backward to let any water drain.
    4. Do NOT use the parking brake if storing for more than a week or two between uses. Chock between the wheels instead.
    5. Have it serviced once a year or if any problems arise.
    6. Keep your hitch ball greased with all-purpose grease and cover with a ball cover or remove and store your hitch in a shoe box between uses. This will make hitching and unhitching much easier!

    And don't let those who have only negative things to say about it but have never used one get to you. These trailers are GREAT, and with just a little TLC will be around for years. Enjoy it!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2000
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    What class receiver hitch are B'up owners using on their tow vehicle?
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,800

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    What class receiver hitch are B'up owners using on their tow vehicle?
    On my Subaru, I used a Class II (rated to 3500 lbs) to pull my Solo. On my RAV4, I have a Class III rated to 5000 lbs. While we're on this topic, Brenderups take a 2" ball (those are usually rated up to 8000 lbs) and the top of your hitch ball should be 17-19" off the ground.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Hi everyone, OP here.

    Thanks for the replies to my questions. And it's interesting to see how people have strong opinions about these trailers!

    One other question I forgot to ask before: do people use their Brenderups for long distance travel/trailering? I'd mostly be using the trailer to go on a trail ride, go to a local schooling show, but there's a chance I'd use it for shows that are 2+ hours away, or perhaps even 12 hours away...although at that distance I'd more than likely travel with my mother in her large truck and trailer just due to the sheer amount of "stuff" that we bring.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2009
    Location
    Garden Prairie, Illinois
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kisstherain View Post
    Hi everyone, OP here.

    Thanks for the replies to my questions. And it's interesting to see how people have strong opinions about these trailers!

    One other question I forgot to ask before: do people use their Brenderups for long distance travel/trailering?

    Yes, my 3 longest trailer rides were to Otter Creek Horse Trials in Northern Wisconsin, Hill n Hound Horse Trials near St. Louis, and Richland Park HT in Michigan. Same 1-horse Solo and Volvo sedan. I will admit it was hard to get all my 'junk' into the car, since the Solo does not have a dressing room. I put my tack trunk and hay bale bag under my OTTB's nose in the front of the trailer, strapped in place so it wouldn't shift.

    Horse traveled better than I did! Driving home alone after a weekend horse trial was hard! but not due to the trailer.... just tired, sleepy, afraid I might nod off on the interstate!!!
    Inese



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2007
    Posts
    284

    Default

    I am the owner of a St. Georges Imara (2-horse) trailer. I got it this spring. It was a 2011 demo model so I got it for $2k less than sticker price. It was sold to me by a person who used to sell B'ups. The St. Georges is very similar with some improvements, mainly the floor which is slightly slanted towards the rear and it is guaranteed for life - it does not come up so nothing to dry out. Just keep it swept, etc. I haul it with a Hyundai Santa Fe with a 5,000 tow rating. I have a 15.3hh gelding who has plenty of room.

    I towed it empty, backed it up, jammed on the brakes, etc. and it never budged or bucked. I also test-towed it with a draft cross and could barely feel it. I was used to driving a friend's trailer and mine tows better. Friend has a 2-horse Trail-et and and V-8 F150 with tow package. I haul around IL & WI with longest trip about 3 hours. So far, so good


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
    Location
    Where The Snow Flies
    Posts
    2,303

    Default

    I have a B'up Royal TC and I tow it with a 6-cyl Chevy Trailblazer and it's a fine combination. I upgraded the suspension a bit (parts needed to be changed anyway) and when I replaced the transmission on the truck (which needed replacement before the trailer) I had them do a really beefy transmission cooler. I am really happy with this towing combination.

    For the poster that said that the trailer fishtailed/lurched if the trailer was well maintained and the driving conditions were appropriate, what you're describing is nearly impossible. After I bought my trailer, I hauled it home empty, through the mountains and into a blizzard with 80 MPH crosswinds. Even in those conditions, the trailer stayed straight and true. Any other traiditional two horse would have been pulling me all over the road. I was so thankful that I bought the trailer I did because otherwise, I might not have made it home that night.

    We had to slam on the brakes once when some yuppie yahoo cut us off after he left the coffee shop and it was raining pretty good. Even then, the trailer acted like a parachute, pulling us to a stop and stayed perfectly straight.

    I can't say enough good things about this trailer. My only complaint is that my trailer will need a floor soon and I am struggling to find a suitable one piece replacement.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
    Posts
    247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    For a 2-horse model you're far better off with at least 5000-7500 lbs of tow capacity, and I can't name a single sedan that passes that muster. But for the Solo and the Prestige 2-horse, some sedans and "cute utes" with 2500 to 4000 lbs of tow capacity might work. It just depends on who you are, how much crap you put in your trailer and tow vehicle, how much your horse weighs, etc.

    You'll notice that so far, everyone piping up about pulling with a sedan is pulling the Solo one-horse model.
    I towed my B'up Royal (2 horse) with a Mercury Cougar, towing capacity of 2000 lbs, for years. Only one horse in it, since the 3500 lb capacity of the class II hitch would have been exceeded. It pulled fine, but it was always on flat land. My 1998 Explorer even strained going up significant hills with one horse in the trailer.
    It has been nice at some very muddy parking conditions, to go in with my Explorer and pull the B'up out by myself--while everyone else is waiting for the tractor to get them out!
    I had some occasional sway with the trailer in the beginning, but not for years. Don't know what changed.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: Nov. 8, 2011, 05:52 PM
  2. Buying babies or buying made
    By Blazergoose in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: Sep. 11, 2011, 06:09 PM
  3. Brenderup
    By Jo in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: Jun. 6, 2011, 08:55 PM
  4. Got a new Brenderup trailer...
    By 2greyhorses in forum Off Course
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: Aug. 6, 2010, 12:43 PM
  5. Is anyone looking for a used Brenderup?
    By KlawPaws in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Nov. 16, 2009, 06:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •