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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2004
    Posts
    372

    Default Eventer crossing over! Any tips

    Hi! I am an event rider in Texas and am planning on doing my first "AA" show on my mare. I've been wanting to do a 1.25 mini prix for a while and this show offers a nice class for me. I am also hoping to take a few of my upper level students to do the low jrs. Does anyone have advice for dos and dont's? Any helpful tips about filling out entries? Attire expected in these classes etc? I sure would appreciate it! Thanks in advance!
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Attire is one of the huge differences in the eventing and hunter world. No stock ties, mostly wrap collars (but just wear a normal collar if you don't have any) in WHITE. Jackets are mostly navy and black with subtly pinstrips/plaid/stripes/etc. Breeches are tan for day classes, and white for night classes (mini prix) and classics. Helmets are black, brown, or occasionally you see a navy/navy CO, samshield, or gpa. Field/Tall boots are the boot of choice, don't see that many dress/no laces boots, but they're out there. Tack should not be blingy. That means no beaded brow bands and the tack is almost all brown, not black. Since you're coming from eventer world, be away that most, if not almost all, people do not wear armbands or safety vests.
    Generally your entries are filled out by a trainer, however they're very straight forward and you should be able to figure it out unless you have any specific questions.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,390

    Default

    The post above sounds very hunter influenced (maybe hence the name "hunterrider?")

    In the jumper ring you don't need to worry about subtle...well....anything. Blingy tack is fine (you'll see lots of beaded browbands, etc.). People wear breeches of all colors during the week (and I've seen everything....brown, grey, pink, black, and so on). The only color not seen is white. Whites are saved for the classics and prixes. The most common color, though, during the week is beige. Beige breeches are also acceptable in classics and prixes though you'll see a lot more whites in those classes.

    During the week day classes the only real rule on tops is that you must have sleeves (meaning long or short sleeves, no sleeveless) and you must have a collar. If it's warm you'll see most folks in polo shirts or shirts with no coat. Colorwise with coats - anything goes in the jumper ring. I have a bunch of crazy plaid and off-color (like pale, pale blue) coats that I wear frequently in the jumper ring. If it's colder out, you'll often see jumpers trend towards sweaters over their show shirts rather than hunt coats. The bigger shows often require hunt coats on the weekend in the big jumper ring.

    In regards to the rest of the show, it really depends on how big of a show it is. If it's a *real* AA show (meaning lots of competition, multiple jumper rings, and lots of big names), be prepared for 1.25m to ride more like 1.30m+. If it's a smaller show or lower on the jumper entry numbers then the courses should ride as expected. But you'll get a feel for that on the first day or two of classes. That may not impact you as a pro, but I would keep it in the back of your mind for your kids.

    Entries are pretty self-explanatory. Just note that it's often easier to add earlier and scratch than to wait until the last minute to add a new class. Many shows will not allow adds in the big ring after the show office closes the day before. Some allow you to add up to the start of the class. The prize book should give you direction there. It seems that the trend these days is not entering the classes for Friday until Thursday and not entering classes on Saturday until Friday, etc. I think it's a really obnoxious trend because no one knows what show entries will look like until the last minute. But the shows have really worked exhibitors in this direction....at least up here in the PNW since there are penalties for adding (or you just can't do it) but none for scratching.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2010
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    239

    Default

    Regarding entries, if you & your students are coming from eventing, you may not aleady be USEF/USHJA members. The non-member fees will tack on a hefty price tag for that show as they are applied for EACH organization, and I believe separately for each the rider, trainer, and horse if all are non-members. Hopefully the show you are going to is next year so you can get the full value out of joining, if you aren't already a member.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    958

    Default

    at the risk of offending you, if you have not ridden at this level in jumpers, you might want to find a jumper trainer who will walk the course with you and help you formulate a plan. also, go to a similar show if at all possible ahead of time and walk the courses yourself to see what it will be like



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2007
    Posts
    147

    Default

    I live in Australia and while we don't seem to do the hunter/equitation thing here, we do have some very keen showjumpers.

    This thread caught my eye because we are eventers and took ourselves to a 3 day showjumping comp over the weekend.

    The biggest difference for us was the speed at which the true showjumpers zoom around the course. A friend commented that you can pretty much pick the eventers, who were there as a schooling opportunity, from the real showjumpers just by watching the rounds.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,868

    Default

    Check carefully the specs on the low juniors and do a bit of research on the course designer. Depending on the show, it may be challenging for your students and you might want to consider the children's for them. You are the best judge for your students, but I remember when I was a junior a couple of top eventers who were renting our barn came to watch me at a show in the lows, and they were very surprised by the course for that level.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2001
    Posts
    4,706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CBoylen View Post
    Check carefully the specs on the low juniors and do a bit of research on the course designer. Depending on the show, it may be challenging for your students and you might want to consider the children's for them. You are the best judge for your students, but I remember when I was a junior a couple of top eventers who were renting our barn came to watch me at a show in the lows, and they were very surprised by the course for that level.
    This. The low juniors can be a really big (1.30m), technical track depending on the course designer. Will be significantly more technical than the equivalent eventing showjumping course. This time of year, course designers seem to like to max things out.

    Not trying to offend, and like cboylen said, you are going to be the best judge of your students, but that is going to be eventing 4* height with much added technicality.

    Also, be sure to know your jumper tables and class types.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2010
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    239

    Default

    Don't forget the nominating fees for the Low Juniors! I know, I know, all of my replies have been cost related. I just want to make sure you & your students know this could be a very expensive way to cross-over for the first time!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,284

    Default

    I actually think in regards to attire you will be fine. My experience with eventers is that they are great horse people and always are turned out appropriately regardless if we are able to tell you apart from the rest of us sheep .

    The technical aspect of the course is what I would be most concerned with. Remember that stadium is just one phase for event land as opposed to the whole shabang over here. There are a lot more questions and a lot more difficult questions. I would consider moving down a level just for the first show. If anything, it will be easy and you have set yourself up for success at future AA jumpers! I am not sure if USEF posts some of the jumper courses from bigger shows like they do for the equitation finals but I would consider looking it up or searching youtube so you can maybe set some courses at home to practice. There is generally a lot more options for inside turns, distances set on the half stride where you have to make a decision to leave out of add, bending lines, and sneakily placed oxers vs. verticals that can draw an easy rail, etc.

    Another food for thought. Get up to date on the different tables and class rules. Some classes have a jump off, some don't, some are power and speed, etc. Also, it is likely you will have more than one course in a day (possibly with two jump offs). Practice memorizing courses! While this may not be too much of an issue because those cross country courses are long, it's an idea.

    Be careful in the schooling ring and think about practicing with your horses in a crowded setting. The warm-up area does not have flags on the jumps like at events. So people can jump the jumps in any direction they want and it can get a little crazy. At past shows I have seen a few event horses be frazzled because of horses coming at them from all different directions.

    Have fun!
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the
    inside of a man.

    -Sir Winston Churchill



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