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  1. #1
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    Jun. 18, 2015
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    Default Does anyone else think this seems a tad dramatic?

    So I spent two years without a facebook, deleted my old page and was bound and determined to not use it. Did not miss it at all.

    However, found it was difficult to obtain needed information without it in some instances and so created a new one so I could follow certain pages, businesses, etc.

    I now have the pleasure of seeing junk people post (if I choose to...I have "unfollowed" just about everyone except the pages I want to follow). Came across this picture just now and it strikes me as somewhat dramatic:

    https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...37&oe=579F87E0

    The horrors that await horses as they age? That's a broad blanket statement. It also discounts the possibility that there are valid reasons for not keeping a horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
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    Mar. 25, 2013
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    Sadly recently I've seen a fair amount of people trying to sell their 20 year old horse or older just because they are no good for them anymore. Horses are a lifetime commitment, not everyone can afford to keep a senior horse, but dumping them when they no longer can serve you is rather sad as well. You know many of them just dump them because they want a new young one and can't afford two so don't want to live out the rest of their senior horses years because it does nothing for them.

    Its a bold statement yes, but its not something I disagree with.

    Saw an ad yesterday, 23 year old mare, bombproof, arthritic but comes out of it, great schooling horse. Why, why not just let her live out her days? Again I know money is a huge factor, but that horse owes you nothing.

    Just sad to see them dumped. Many end up at the meat market as well


    17 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Oct. 23, 2001
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    Default

    That said some make great trail riding horses for newbies and novice type weekend riders BUT I am one of those folks who has them to the bitter end. Our oldest horse is 36 years old. We may be seeing him cross the bridge in late fall.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyB View Post
    Saw an ad yesterday, 23 year old mare, bombproof, arthritic but comes out of it, great schooling horse. Why, why not just let her live out her days? Again I know money is a huge factor, but that horse owes you nothing.
    (
    I'd think a mare like that has some good useful years ahead of her. I'd probably consider giving space to someone like that - I'd love to have a retired schoolie around the farm for my nephew or visitors to ride. I'd be willing to manage some soundness issues in return for her taking me or my company on some walk/trot trail rides.

    She'd also probably make a good first horse for somebody, who'd hopefully give her a good retirement. I bought my Bram when he was in his early twenties, and he's with me still eleven years later.

    That said, I believe if you can retire a horse who is ready to retire, then you ought to do it. I read a thread on here just yesterday about some young girl flipping horses to the meat man.
    I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Jul. 17, 2009
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    south eastern US
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    Default

    I guess my horses are luckier than most. I have committed to keeping them for their entire lives. There are a lot of people out there who still believe that it is normal for a senior horse to be a walking skeleton "because he's old" and are too ignorant to know what to feed them or too lazy to go through the effort. There are too many people who want to dump their old useless horses because they want a new younger model. My seniors cost at least twice as much to feed as the younger horses who still have the chops to eat grass and hay. The younger ones don't need as much time and effort to feed them as the seniors do what with soaking their beep, alfalfa cubes and senior pellets so they can keep their nice round figures instead of looking walking skeletons. I figure he's given me his whole life, the least I can do is give him a secure retirement and dignified death when the time comes.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Jun. 24, 2009
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    Default

    I think it's a lot more than a "tad" dramatic.

    Horses live longer and more productive lives than ever. A 20 year old horse can be the perfect first horse or husband horse, and with proper care can be useful for another 10 years.

    Horses are not dogs. It makes sense for them to change hands during their careers to the suit their riders.


    18 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Aug. 30, 2013
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    Default

    The number of dumb/false/dramatic memes online is staggering. I just ignore them. I don't actually find this one to be all that bad compared to some.

    The ones I find worse are the photos accompanied with some caption like "this is a murderer/animal abuser/peeper SHARE AND WARN THE WORLD". Which people do without even a shred of evidence that the caption is true. Or, even if it were true (big if) it's far flippin' far away it makes no bloody difference.

    Canadians went completely insane over ketchup over social media a few months ago. People ranting about things that were incomplete or simply untrue because they could not even bother to google a single news report.

    I could rant about this for a while! LOL


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Jun. 18, 2015
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    Default

    I understand the message of not dumping a horse just because he's too old, has some issues, whatever. But what exactly are these unspeakable horrors that affect all horses as they age? You're right, PlanB, horses are living longer lives and there are means available today to keep horses more comfortable and extend their working lives. It would not be possible for many riders to move up through levels without periodically switching mounts, getting a more advanced horse, etc. And there's a big difference between "this horse is old so I'm dumping him" and "he's getting older and arthritic and not comfortable doing this job anymore, but maybe someone needs a pasture buddy or a light trail horse?"

    This is coming from someone who fully intends to keep her horse for his life. Just saying, we don't need to be so dramatic and potentially judgmental. Then again, that's what the internet is for, right?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Feb. 20, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyB View Post
    Saw an ad yesterday, 23 year old mare, bombproof, arthritic but comes out of it, great schooling horse. Why, why not just let her live out her days? Again I know money is a huge factor, but that horse owes you nothing.
    Wouldn't sell my 26 year old mare, but as long as she's rideable I don't want her to just "live out her days" - she does much, much better physically with regular light riding.
    She might need to retire this year. Or she might be rideable til she's 30, who knows.
    Proud Member Of The Lady Mafia


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Mar. 25, 2013
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    That I understand, giving them a job until they can't anymore. Our mare went to be a part time schoolie for a little bit because she couldn't do what we wanted but she could cart little kiddies around at the trot. She was great for that. This way she was being used and mentally being worked and physically moving for her arthritis but we still owned her and knew where she was and how she was being treated. It helped my sister worked at the barn at that time and ran the lessons with her.

    I just know some people have dumped their horses who can't do anything and because of that just want to get rid of them.. when they are no use but a companion for someone else. Its not fair.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Jan. 12, 2008
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    Default

    Couldn't you change that to any species?
    Lately I've been thinking "The horrors that await HUMANS as they age are as unthinkable as they are very real."
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique


    12 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Mar. 25, 2013
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    Default

    And a thread was just started for a horse that is 28 that is free to a good home. How sad.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Feb. 24, 2010
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    Default

    Actually, so many young sound horses end up badly, the very old or infirm do not stand a chance. (Just like the old dogs and adult cats who end up at the pound.)

    Check out the other thread with the giveaway of a 28 yr old horse.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Default

    While I understand the initial reaction to the give away of a 28 year old horse, at least there is a vet acting as mediator in finding it a home. The post doesn't give details for the circumstances, so there's no way to judge the situation in that respect. At least it appears an effort is being made to give the horse a soft landing. As sad as it may be, I would much rather see this type of situation going through a vet rather than an ad on Craigslist for a free horse. That would be much worse IMO.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PRS View Post
    I guess my horses are luckier than most. I have committed to keeping them for their entire lives..
    and they are determined to out live me... the oldest we just know is over 40 as he was between 30 and 40 estimated by the vet fifteen years ago


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    Default

    I love my horses (and my oldest retired guy is in his mid 30s now) but I don't believe that I need to keep every horse its entire life to be a good horseman. Think of all the great beginner horses that could go on to teach another kid or novice adult the ropes (and enjoy being fussed over in the process?) as just one example. Or the grand prix horse that might need to step down a few levels but is used to being a pampered show horse and could be a super lower level mount for some lucky rider?

    I have an older horse that I'd love to find a job for. He is in his late teens and perfectly sound and happy to work. Given my work responsibilities I have a hard time riding 2 each day and my other horse is a better fit for my current riding goals, so I am paying for the older one to be put on the treadmill at a place where he can also get a lot more turnout than would be available at the typical training barn. I do go SEE him every day that I am home and he gets groomed and loved on and so forth but I don't ride him often. He would frankly do better with a rider that wanted to be in a program to do lower level dressage or perhaps the 2'6" or 3' hunters, where he would be quite competitive. He is my heart horse and not for sale, but if the right person came along I don't think it would be *wrong* to sell him.

    Despite what some people think, not every horse is happiest being retired. Some of them really do enjoy having an (appropriate) job and if they are sound and happy doing it, why not?
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
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    Jun. 24, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyB View Post
    And a thread was just started for a horse that is 28 that is free to a good home. How sad.
    Sad, but we don't know if the owner is dying of cancer, or maybe she is just too old herself to take care of a horse anymore. I don't want to judge wihtout knowing.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    I think it is dramatic. There is no reason why old well trained horses cannot find new homes. Or horses can't be rehomed when owners situations change. The belief that everyone must keep every horse they own is further turning horses into the pet paradigm. Trying to dump one because you don't want to euthanize is a whole other story. But just expecting everyone to keep their horses is doing nothing to help horses.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    I don't think it is dramatic at all. I think it is spot on and well said. When I bought my big eventing mare, I told her owner I was her last home. 2 years later she tore a suspensory. I will have her till the end of her life. My gelding is 16 and I've had him from birth. I am forever his owner. It is not the most cost effective thing to do but it is the most humane. I cannot fathom him old and scared in a feed lot. Shelters are full of old pets where the owners died and no one stepped up. It's heartbreaking.
    "Punch him in the wiener. Then leave." AffirmedHope


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    May. 26, 2007
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    Default

    Sub "dramatic" for "uncomfortably truthful" and I'm on board.


    It's shockingly easy for good horses to get swept under the rug and disappear into the auction/slaughter pipeline as they age and become less desireable.


    6 members found this post helpful.

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