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  1. #121
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    Jan. 11, 2007
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    Central VA
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    Creepy! I'm anxious to hear if it was them.

    I'd rather be cautious and follow my instincts about something like this and be wrong and branded "crazy" than be dead. Like the old saying says, better to be judged by 12 than carried by 6!

    I think you did the right thing, RR. If it were me and it happened here, I'd call the police, go to the house and get a weapon and my doberman and then call the number.

    I'm a huge advocate of having a big scary dog if you live in the country. Mine has put the fear of God into several people, he's sweet as can be to "his" people but he also takes his job very seriously and can be quite intimidating. If I see a car driving down our private road that I don't know, out goes the dobe to run around. I figure if it is someone casing the joint, hopefully they'll decide to pick an easier target!



  2. #122
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Are people not reading what I read on here? The OP has locked gates, good fences, there are no trails through, and these trespassers claimed a full-grown horse and blue tooth were lost in the middle of her pastures? Anyone who thinks these people were legit are wrong. If you aren't proactive about security, and aren't suspicious of trespassers then you might pay with your life. Where my aunt used to live, way out in the country, a harmless elderly woman was murdered in the middle of the afternoon, and they have never found anyone responsible, or even a suspect over a lot of years. A woman disappeared, and her body was never found from a scenic overlook right near where I worked, and this happened in broad daylight next to a heavily traveled road. Many years ago people didn't lock up, or have security systems, or distrust visitiors, but that's not the world we live in today. You need to make reasonable precautions, and a legitimate visitor that gets all upset about you checking on them, or calling the cops to make sure that they're not bad guys is up to something. And don't forget that most burglaries and thefts start with casing the property, so the innocent looking person who keeps dropping by, probably isn't so innocent.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


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  3. #123
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2009
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon
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    540

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    I feel sorry for that child.
    Quote Originally Posted by dizzywriter View Post
    My saddle fits perfectly well. It might be a little tight around the waist, but I take care of that with those spandex things.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #124
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    414

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    Quote Originally Posted by RacetrackReject View Post
    I'm not sure if any of them were my people or not yet.
    Had to laugh RTR... you are getting proprietary!



  5. #125
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
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    a little north of Columbus GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belg View Post
    It's not about animals wandering on to property. Stuff happens, no matter how diligant you are trying to prevent it. It's about how you approach retrieving them, about respecting the rights of the property owner. It's about announcing your presence and your reason for being there. All these things we learned as children on & around farms to keep yourself from staring down the barrel of a shotgun or getting a load of rock salt in your butt... Make your presence known. "Hi, I'm Mark, I'm sorry to bother you, but a tree took out our common fence and my horse is in your pasture." And having the halter and lead rope in hand is a huge plus.
    Yep. When I looked out to find a guy opening my pasture gate I was a little upset... until I saw the calf that his friend was herding into the pasture. I was still not thrilled, but better the animal is safely contained while they go get a trailer than running around possibly causing a traffic accident. If any of mine got loose I would hope the favor is returned.

    Around here, people don't generally show up uninvited. In fact when I *do* give someone directions to the farm, they are very likely to respond with the make and color of their vehicle. I even had one guy tack on a "so don't shoot" to that info.

    You bet I'd be concerned if a strange vehicle was parked here when I got home! I'd be on the phone to my neighbor first thing and the police non-emergency line (which goes to the same place as 911, it's a small county,) after that.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick


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  6. #126
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Remember the warnings that the cops give too. If someone wants to look harmless they come around with a bunch of brochures, or dress in a unform and carry a clipboard.

    Anyone watch the BTK documentary about the Wichita serial killer? He was an installer for years for a certain alarm company, and used the codes and other info he learned from the job to get access to his victims.
    Recently a couple of ADT salesmen were wandering around, and when I said I had a system, they started to get very aggressive about wanting to know if I knew the houses that didn't, and their phone numbers (I told them to get lost). Shortly after that there was a burglary at a house up the street-bet those two salesmen had a very unpleasant afternoon with a couple of detectives. And I'm sure they went way beyond company policy with their questions.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  7. #127
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    JanM, we had the same thing. A couple of so called alarm salesmen wandering door to door. We all have LONG driveways, so not much door to door. My neighbor tells me they had no identification. I opened the door slightly with all four dogs barking their heads off, told them if they could get through my house from the front door and out the back in one piece, I'd buy everything they had. They declined.

    My dogs know when someone is up to no good.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #128
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
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    311

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    In our neighborhood, we just had a rash of break-ins and robberies. In fact, the folks just up the road had some strangers pull in and knock on their door, and ask for directions. They left peaceably. Then two houses nearby were broken into and robbed that day, after their visit. I'm just terrified they're going to come here looking for portable valuables, and I pull in. There's only one way in and out due to the way our driveway is set up; I don't want to surprise anyone desperate.



  9. #129
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
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    2,152

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    Same MO a few miles up the road but I think they got him.

    Sheesh. Do these guys share secrets on a bulletin board: Chronicle of the Crook?
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  10. #130
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2001
    Location
    Pacific NW
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    3,790

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    I live in the land of coffee and software, surrounded by Priuses and Porsches. A month or so ago, someone knocked on a neighbor's door around 10 am. She didn't feel like going to the door, so she ignored it. The person kicked in the door and came into the house. The homeowner screamed and ran out another door. Police arrived about 10 minutes later and locked down the neighborhood. We have been getting people knocking on the door with "iffy" reasons probably 3 times a week, and there are several break-ins in our techie town each day.

    About a year ago, a neighbor family pulled into their driveway to find a van with a woman sitting in it, backed up to the front door. Dad got out of the car to talk to the woman, who was making a phone call. As he walked up to the van, four men came out of the house and beat him severely, putting him in the ICU in a coma.

    Several months later, someone knocked on my next door neighbor's door at 1 a.m.. Their 6 year old got out of bed and looked out the window to see three men wearing black clothes and ski masks. She turned on a light and they ran back down the driveway.

    Last spring, my DH and I were awakened at 5 a.m. by pounding on our front door. DH got up, flipped on the hall light and headed to the door. No one there. Called the police to report it, and they said it was likely burglers looking for houses with no one home.

    They did catch two separate rings working our city, and things have been quieter lately. We were told that it wouldn't be long before another group moved in to take their place, so we shouldn't get complacent.

    There have been a couple homeowners in the area that used deadly force to defend themselves inside their own homes in the last year or two. No charges were filed.

    This stuff happens all the time, in all areas of the country. Drug addiction drives much of it, but there are many who don't care if it's your stuff, they think that if they can steal it, you deserve to lose it. And they are not willing to throw their hands up and surrender if they meet up with you in your own home. They will hurt you or kill you to get away, so sometimes just for the kicks.

    I'm thinking about getting handgun training and getting one to keep in the house. We have long guns (DH used to be a sharp shooter) and I do ok with those, but since I will be shooting from where I will be hiding in the closet, I'm not sure I can fit a long one in there.


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  11. #131
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    This thread is really about risk assessment, and risk assessment is a skill.

    Has anyone here ever read The Gift of Fear, by Gavin DeBecker? If not, those who don't think this was something to be alarmed about might want to think about it.

    As it says in the description: True fear is a gift. Unwarranted fear is a curse. Learn to tell the difference.


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  12. #132
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Burglars and other criminals routinely case neighborhoods, and one place where I lived they would poison dogs before they hit the neighborhoods. And if you get hit once, they often come back after you've had time to replace items. Don't believe the scam where some lone woman comes to the door either, or is standing alone hitchhiking-usually there are a bunch of guys waiting for a chance to get to you then. And remember that being female doesn't equal harmless-remember the woman serial killer in Florida? Charlize Theron played her in the movies, and some experts think that at least some of the unsolved serial killings are not solved because women aren't considered serial killers. Women aren't harmless or not dangerous either.

    If you don't protect yourself then who will? I would rather call the cops or my armed neighbors (they're all military here, and many have extra training) on someone who's harmless, then find out I made a fatal mistake by trusting some stranger that was up to no good.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  13. #133
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPF View Post
    Creepy!
    I'm a huge advocate of having a big scary dog if you live in the country. Mine has put the fear of God into several people, he's sweet as can be to "his" people but he also takes his job very seriously and can be quite intimidating. If I see a car driving down our private road that I don't know, out goes the dobe to run around. I figure if it is someone casing the joint, hopefully they'll decide to pick an easier target!
    I have big scary dogs too, and one although my friends and family know how sweet they are, I never let on to that with strangers. When a stranger comes to the door, I let the dogs bark -- they are big dogs with intimidating barks -- and I squeeze open the door a crack while the dogs whine and snort and press their massive heads next to me just enough that they can be seen. Then I say "be careful of the dogs, I don't trust them." It's very effective. If I were to just throw open the door, like I do with company, the dogs would wag their tails and be happy, but strangers don't know that.

    Of course the smart thing is to not open your door to strangers at all, but I make that call depending on time of day, who's around, etc. If I lived alone in the country, I would definitely have a security screen door. I realize the situation was different with the OP who found them there when she arrived.



  14. #134
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    Jan. 2, 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    447

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    I don't care who they said they were or what the reason! Sounds like a possible scam. Around here, there was "someone" saying they were selling insurance and boom multiple people were robbed(me included). You cannot be too careful!!!
    Strange how much you've got to know Before you know how little you know. Anonymous



  15. #135
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
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    6,917

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    There's a classic saying, "When seconds count, the police are minutes away".

    Remember, the police don't stop crime, they come after and take notes. You can call the police, but things will be over before they show up...so it's up to the individual and their neighbors to protect themselves. Order a pizza and call the cops...guess who'll show up first?
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"


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  16. #136
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    Apr. 29, 2006
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    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    3,081

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    When a stranger comes to the door, I let the dogs bark -- they are big dogs with intimidating barks -- and I squeeze open the door a crack while the dogs whine and snort and press their massive heads next to me just enough that they can be seen. Then I say "be careful of the dogs, I don't trust them."
    My mother lives alone, and when she had a dog, she did something similiar whenever she had say, a repairman come over. The dog was very nice, but decent sized, and a big barker. Mom would always answer the door, peek out, and tell the guy something like "Hold on a sec while I put a leash on the dog. I don't want him to bite you." And then she'd tote that dog around on a leash with her the whole time the repair guy was working.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  17. #137
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    Oct. 20, 2005
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    Please let us know what happens, RR.

    My parents' house is in a rural-almost suburban- area on about 8/10ths of an acre, set back from the road but visible. Just on Wednesday afternoon, a guy driving a truck with out of state plates came to the open front door, knocked or yelled, and when my mom came to the door asked "Are you vegetarians?" My mom said, "Yes," and moved to close the door. The guy keeps talking "Seriously? Are you really? I've got some meat for sale.... <door closed and locked> I'm just trying to make a living here!" and then drove away.

    Seriously, door to door MEAT salesman, DRIVING house to house at $4/gallon? You can imagine how many takers he must have. I visited their house about half an hour after he'd gone. My mom was never so glad to see my dog and me!

    Re: The Gift of Fear. I got it for a steal of a deal and was very much into reading it, when my dog chewed it up. I guess he was trying to tell me something.

    And I live in town, neighboring houses 10-20 feet away but the one on one side is vacant. Night before last, I was on the phone with a horse-y friend late, 11PM or later, when I heard several bangs ("sounds like a horse who's cast," is actually how I described it at that moment) on the outside wall (which is enclosed in a fenced backyard.) I told her "Stay on the phone with me," and I rushed to shut and lock the windows and the door into the garage, close the curtains, turn off the inside lights, and figure out what was going on. I eventually took the dog outside WHILE still on the phone with my friend, locking the door behind me, to see if anyone was there. Didn't find anything, but the whole thing scared the bejesus out of me. Had I not been on the phone with my friend, I probably wouldn't have called the cops but after reading this thread I might next time!
    It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati



  18. #138
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slewdledo View Post
    Re: The Gift of Fear. I got it for a steal of a deal and was very much into reading it, when my dog chewed it up. I guess he was trying to tell me something.
    so you think it wasn't worth reading?



  19. #139
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Larkspur, Colo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slewdledo View Post

    Seriously, door to door MEAT salesman, DRIVING house to house at $4/gallon? You can imagine how many takers he must have. I visited their house about half an hour after he'd gone. My mom was never so glad to see my dog and me!
    I had the same guys drive up to my house a few years ago. Creepy looking guys with a big freezer in the bed of the pickup truck. I told them "no thanks, I don't eat meat." They said, "we have salmon." I said I didn't like fish and asked them to leave, which they did.

    I have also had harmless, friendly people drop by. And, of course, the Jehovah's Witnesses (they will not come back if tell them not too).

    I am seriously thinking about adding an electric gate.



  20. #140
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    Oct. 20, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    so you think it wasn't worth reading?
    Not at all! Just my dog's way of saying, "Don't be afraid, you've got ME!"
    It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati



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