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  1. #1
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    Default *HELP* need potty training for backwards Beagle, UPDATE and more pics page 2

    First an excuse to make you go Awwww

    http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/b...gs/1stsept.jpg

    Our cute little beagle pup, Eddie the Beagle Edwards

    Eddie the Beagle is so far as successful, at potty training, as his UK ski jumping namesake , Eddie the Eagle, was at getting Olympic Gold.

    I have raised many pups, some were simple, some were tough, but there has never been one quite like Eddie, who is convinced that indoors is for potty breaks, and you keep outside clean

    As I say, not my first one by any means, but I take him out every time he wakes up, after every meal, and an hour after his meal. I have spent more time walking him around on a lead than any other puppy have ever had, no matter how long he is out he wont take a dump outside, we have had ONE outside that I saw and could praise him for. Peeing he is a little better, probably about 50% of the time he will have a pee, so once again I can make a big fuss of him.

    Often though he won't do anything, and when you eventually have to go on in and so something with your life, he will in quick short time take a potty break on the floor

    I had to be in town yesterday afternoon, so left him with the big guys in their run, that has access to our porch, when we come him he had done his business right up against the door to the house.

    He has me scratchng my head at the moment, any ideas, thanks?
    Last edited by KBC; Sep. 11, 2012 at 06:53 PM.
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  2. #2
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    Default

    Try crating him. When you think it's close to him having to poo. Take him out, if he doesn't go, put him in the crate, wait 10-15 minutes, let him out again. If he doesn't go, put him in the crate, wait 10-15 mins, let him out ect.

    Most dogs (NOT all *cough* my doberman *cough*) don't like to mess their sleep area. So if he associates his crate as his sleep area, he should not want to mess in there and if he then doesn't have access to the house till he goes outside he should not have much opportunity to go. Be prepared with plenty of praise/treats/toys when he does go outside.



  3. #3
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    Tie him to you on a short tether, and crate when you can't have eyeballs on him. When he DOES go inside, you'll catch him right away if he's tethered--get him outside, post haste, and let him finish out there. Then praise.

    Also develop a "get down to business" word and stance. My puppy understands playtime outside is different than "just get on with it and go already" time. The difference is my posture. Eventually that will transfer to a word command.

    Oh, and make your crate SMALL. He should be able to turn around and lie down, but that's it. You might have to buy one or two as he grows, but the LAST thing you want if for him to have enough room to potty and sleep in a clean spot.

    Good luck! There's a reason why they are so cute at this age!



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post

    Good luck! There's a reason why they are so cute at this age!
    LOL, I've thought that before, the dobie who chewed the edges of my new kitchen cabinets comes to mind.
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  5. #5
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    Sounds like the breeder raises the litters indoors, with little/no access to outside. Eddie the Beaglet thinks its the norm to poo inside. I agree with all posts above with regard to crate and house lead. Be firm in this...the only time he has freedom off lead indoors is right after he poos,

    Beagles are one of the toughest breeds to housebreak in my experience...all the more reason to stick to your schedule, keep him tethered to you or in the crate if he didn't do what he should do, and (I'm sure you know this, but sticking it in here as a reminder) NEVER SHOW ANGER IF HE OOPSES.
    When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE THEM.



  6. #6
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    I'm not sure how relevant this is, but I figured I'd throw it out there.

    Our JRT is famous for not pooping (or peeing) in the grass if it's too long or wet at all. She would either do her business on the porch or hold it until somebody left (she lived in the kitchen when we were gone) and then mess in the house. She KNEW she was bad and would roll over on her belly at your feet the moment you walked in the door.

    Then I started walking on on the gravel driveway... made a world of difference. Insta-business! She just doesn't like the grass touching her bum.

    We also now crate her when we're not home, but that's for counter-surfing/diaper eating.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  7. #7
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    Think we're going to try the tethering thing next, and hope that works, *SIGH* little bugger
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  8. #8
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    We also have a dog who is funny about things touching his bum, and tall grass tends to make for lots of trotting around trying to find just the right place to pop a squat.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superminion View Post
    She KNEW she was bad and would roll over on her belly at your feet the moment you walked in the door.
    I'm not picking on you, but I see this idea posted a lot and want to correct it. They do not know that they did something wrong. Dogs are really good at picking up our moods, after all, they've had plenty of time to get to know us. So they pick up on our displeasure and anger about finding a poop, shredded paper, chewed shoe, etc... and they make calming signals which we see as a guilty conscious. It's thought that dogs have at least 30 different calming signals - rolling over being one of them.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...alming-signals

    Thought of something I wanted to add. Let's say your dog poops inside while you're gone about 50% of the time. So you are already thinking about it when you get home and are already getting stressed - the dog will sense this and show calming signals. Also, if you get home, find the poop, get angry, punish the dog, etc... the dog has been taught that when you come home, you get angry. The dog will show calming signals when you walk in the door.
    You are what you dare.



  10. #10
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    I don't know about the doing something wrong thing, I used to know the minute I walked in through the door if my old Dobie had done something she shouldn't of done, it was just a case of finding out what

    Grass doesn't seem to bother Eddie, I have more issues convincing him that you can't eat gravel, sigh, and he is awake, so off we go, come on Eddie, let's "Go Pee"
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  11. #11
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    sounds like someone accidentally taught him to potty inside. Seems like once he learns "where to go" though he's going to be pretty good about it...

    Possibly you just need to "get the idea through to him" once or twice. So maybe schedule a complete day off from ANY responsibilities, and stay outside with him. Take him on a 12-hour hike if necessary. Eventually he'll have to go, and then you praise, praise, praise. That might get through to him that it's good to go outside.

    Or you can try the "boring" routine: crate to potty spot, stand there being boring until he goes; if he goes, then you have a party and go on a fun walk/ have a fun game; if he doesn't go after a reasonable amount of time, back into the crate he goes for 15 minutes. Eventually he'll have to go. The advantage of this method is it automatically teaches and rewards the pup for going "on command", and there are many times in life when having a dog that will potty quickly on command is a really good thing- pouring rain, you're late for work,..



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotGait View Post
    I'm not picking on you, but I see this idea posted a lot and want to correct it. They do not know that they did something wrong. Dogs are really good at picking up our moods, after all, they've had plenty of time to get to know us. So they pick up on our displeasure and anger about finding a poop, shredded paper, chewed shoe, etc... and they make calming signals which we see as a guilty conscious. It's thought that dogs have at least 30 different calming signals - rolling over being one of them.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...alming-signals

    Thought of something I wanted to add. Let's say your dog poops inside while you're gone about 50% of the time. So you are already thinking about it when you get home and are already getting stressed - the dog will sense this and show calming signals. Also, if you get home, find the poop, get angry, punish the dog, etc... the dog has been taught that when you come home, you get angry. The dog will show calming signals when you walk in the door.
    Thank you!

    It makes perfect sense, really. We could always tell when she had an accident in the house, because when she greeted us at the door it was on her belly, eyes squinted and tail wagging. No mess, and she was her normal self.

    Changes my whole perspective on things! Didn't mean to hijack... thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  13. #13
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    Changes for today, I have changed his designated potty patch, we are now walking out to the utility pole in the middle of the yard, no playing or interaction allowed, that is a place for business, in every sense of the word.

    Far from spending longer out there, I'm taking less time, so we went out when he didn't pee, brought him back in, kept him on the leash, waited 10 mins and tried again, this time he went quickly, made a huge fuss if him, then let him off to "go play" on command with the rest of the gang,

    I wonder if Go Pee and Go Play, even with different inflections is too close?

    So far no poop this morning, he is sleepy today, so will take him out when he wakes up.
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  14. #14
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    I wonder if Go Pee and Go Play, even with different inflections is too close?
    they usually listen primarily to the first "chunk" of sound, so I'd suggest dropping the "GO" from one of these, unless you say them differently? they also listen to HOW you say things- if you say things in a quick, choppy fast way it tends to energize them, vs. saying them in a slow way. So if you said "GO play" emphasizing a sharp, fast hard GO it would be "energizing" (Appropriate for going off and playing) and sound very different from saying go PEEEEE emphasizing the pee part.
    You should strive for consistent sound, obviously, since they don't really understand language.



  15. #15
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    YEAH, we are making a little progress, not only did Eddie manage to pee on every outside visit, and I think he is starting to get a connection between Go Pee and actually peeing, put we also got a couple of poops while on the lead.

    There were accidents though, BUT he is now crying and running toward the door after the event, so I think we are making some progress.
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  16. #16
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    A dog owner/breeder I know will resort to "matching" if the pup really doesnt understand outside pooping.
    Basically, when you are convinced that he has to go but is not producing outside you get a couple of regular matches. Stick the business in your mouth for a moment for spit lube Then insert into doggie's rectum, again, business end first. Dont have to be far in. It should be just irritating enough to stimulate pup to go. She rewards the dog even if all he poops are the matches, as long as he assumes the position. She doesnt do this routinely, but to get the idea across to a clueless dog and help get him on a schedule.



  17. #17
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    I haven't thought about that trick for years. I used to be a head girl at a greyhound racing kennel, and we would do that if we had a dog who refused to go, especially if they were heavy at a race weigh in and you needed quick results.

    Not sure about using it on a puppy though
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  18. #18
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    Take him out every hour on the hour whether he acts like he has to go or not. Do this for a week and you have a housebroken pup!
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  19. #19
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    We have had a really good day today, I think he is getting the idea, YIPPEE
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  20. #20
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    I guess animal and parenting boards are where you read posts with people cheering about poop!

    I forgot how young the boy is. Glad he had some "success". I think with Beagles more than some other breeds it is imortant to get this established early. An older Beagle without good housebreaking can be really difficult to convince. And then there is the whole issue of preventing poop recycling!



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