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  1. #1

    Default I think my BO might try to stop me from taking my horse- advice?

    Using an alter, I don't want to name names here...

    I've had a live-in barn manager position for a few months. Barn owner and I were a very bad match. Her horses and the client horses were also egregiously badly behaved. After getting maliciously double- barreled and having to crawl out of the pasture on all fours, I decided I simply could not continue to work there any longer. I told the BO I would be out by Sunday and that we could settle up on anything owed.

    I ran back on Friday night to tie up a few loose ends as far as the apartment went and return the keys. (my tack and horse are still there). She had put a padlock on the gate.

    I'm not even sure what to think about it. I never gave her any idea that I would try to skulk out in the middle of the night. But I hadn't even officially moved out yet, and she has denied me access to the property. It kind of feels like she took the nuclear option, and I'm worried she is going to try to prevent me from taking my horse Sunday.

    I've never been in such an adversarial position and I don't know what I should do. Advice please?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2002
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    I think I would write a letter to get something in writing (and follow-up with a call) trying to find a time where you can discuss anything that is owed/perceived to be owed. My guess is that BO thinks you owe money and does not want you to take off without paying it.

    So, set up a time to discuss payment. Do you think you owe her money or vice versa?
    "I'd rather have a horse. A horse is at least human, for god's sake." - J.D. Salinger



  3. #3
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    Have you asked her what you owe/are owed in writing? I would definitely do that, then arrange a time to pay/be paid in person. With cashier's checks/cash and written receipts so nothing bounces.

    Alternatively, she might be worried that you would take stuff that isn't yours in your move. That happens FREQUENTLY -- not saying that you would do this, but she may want to supervise your departure because she's had others that did in the past and been burned. arrange a time to meet her there to get your horse and tack.

    I honestly would make sure to arrange a time to pick up the horse that she would be there because I wouldn't want any allegations that I did anything I shouldn't have. I would personally want the BO to oversee everything I did so she couldn't allege I took anything that wasn't mine later. I would try to make it sooner rather than later so I could make sure my horse is OK.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2003
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    Townsend, MA
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    What was your agreement? Stall and apartment in exchange for work? Was any notice discussed? Is there pay in addition to the perks? How many hours?
    Not enough info to form an opinion.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    It kind of feels like she took the nuclear option,
    First call or attempt to contact the BO for an explaination

    But if what you have said is occuring then you need to run not walk to the ER or see a doctor for an inspection of you body by professionals for the record regarding the injuries that occurred while on the job.

    You need to set a baseline on your health so as if this war gets nasty you can lob a few nukes back

    I wonder if the BO has filled all of their IRS paperwork for your employment also?

    and insurance? if the barn has none but this is run on private property ... hit their homeowners policy for the damages


    9 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2015
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    The arrangement was work (~30 hours) in exchange for rent and board.

    I think I will end up owing her around $350, but she owes $450 in the security deposit (the apartment is immaculate, she couldn't have anything to ding me on there).

    I texted her, but she hasn't responded.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    I think that, if you are a legal renter, she can't lock you out.
    That is one against her and for you right there, if it comes to a dispute.

    You could run that situation of being locked out by the police station, someone there may have some ideas for you.

    An attorney always helps also, but you may not want to spend that money if not necessary after all.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
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    I would stay calm, quiet, and polite until you speak with her but be prepared for her to refuse to give you back your deposit. If she has a problem you might be better off calling it even and getting out of dodge.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2008
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    Whatever you do, document everything. Also, don't go back alone.
    Quote Originally Posted by alicen View Post
    We have no intentions of tarring and feathering anyone: this is now a thread about dipping Ryan Reynolds in chocolate.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    It sounds like she gave notice and plans on paying for the 30 days as required even though she's leaving immediately.



  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Go back with the sheriff. If you've paid up to the end of the month then the owner has no cause to lock you out.

    When you go back be prepared to settle accounts, in cash if necessary (but get a receipt).

    Collect your horse and your stuff and get out of there.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    16 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Agree with post above and you should do this as soon as possible!!!
    "My treasures do not chink or gleam, they glitter in the sun and neigh at night."
    ~Gypsy saying


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Northern Virginia, 45 minutes east of paradise - 2 hrs during rush hour
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    Strange mix and match of renter/boarder/employee laws. Rent is part of the compensation, but a security deposit is required. I always wondered how that sort of thing works out. Renter's laws are very strong in most places, but you are an employee. In any case, she can't keep your horse without a lien. She does not own it. She can't keep it.
    Last edited by Stacie; Mar. 28, 2015 at 01:48 PM.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
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    Catharpin, Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Go back with the sheriff. If you've paid up to the end of the month then the owner has no cause to lock you out.

    When you go back be prepared to settle accounts, in cash if necessary (but get a receipt).

    Collect your horse and your stuff and get out of there.

    G.
    This. As an aside, she'd better hope your horse does not have some sort of medical problem, wherein you can't get to it. Did you sign a boarding agreement?

    She has no right to keep you away from your property (apt furnishings and your horse) unless you owe her money and she has a lien.

    She may be overreacting, agreed. But I've been on the end of a work situation like yours wherein the apt was trashed (several times), so I would want to be present on a move-out (once to the tune of over $2,000 in damage).

    That said, it was I who was trying to contact the employee to no avail. But she had no horse here so she went AWOL. This BO should be the one trying to contact you, IMO, to settle up, so that's screwy.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2008
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    She owes $450 in the security deposit? THat is what you said, but that makes no sense to me. Why should your landlady owe money in a security deposit? It is the tenant who pays the deposit, not the landlady.

    Did you give her any notice at all? Did you sign a lease? WHat are its terms?

    What do you mean by being "maliciously double-barreled in the pasture"? I am assuming injured, since you crawled out, but what is double-barreling and can you prove it was malicious?

    Sorry, would love to offer helpful feedback but I can't make any sense of your post.

    I suggest what others have already suggested, go to the police or the sheriff, whichever jurisdiction the barn is in, and ask them what to do.

    Sounds to me like you have gotten screwed, but legally, if there is a lease, there may be some requirement as to notice.
    Rack on!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by worriedalter2 View Post
    Using an alter, I don't want to name names here...

    I've had a live-in barn manager position for a few months. Barn owner and I were a very bad match. Her horses and the client horses were also egregiously badly behaved. After getting maliciously double- barreled and having to crawl out of the pasture on all fours, I decided I simply could not continue to work there any longer. I told the BO I would be out by Sunday and that we could settle up on anything owed.

    I ran back on Friday night to tie up a few loose ends as far as the apartment went and return the keys. (my tack and horse are still there). She had put a padlock on the gate.

    I'm not even sure what to think about it. I never gave her any idea that I would try to skulk out in the middle of the night. But I hadn't even officially moved out yet, and she has denied me access to the property. It kind of feels like she took the nuclear option, and I'm worried she is going to try to prevent me from taking my horse Sunday.

    I've never been in such an adversarial position and I don't know what I should do. Advice please?
    Do you owe her money? That's the only valid reason to hold your horse for "ransom." Have you violated any kind of contractual obligation she would be trying to enforce this way? Have you given her any reason to believe that as a "disgruntled former employee" you might do harm to the premises in any way?

    If the answer to all of the above is "No.," and I'm assuming it is, call her and tell her you're bringing a police officer with you when you go to pick up your property, being the horse and tack. Then do it!

    I have one boarder who had to extract herself from her former situation that way; cuts WAY down on the drama when there's a LEO standing there!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
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    California
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rackonteur View Post
    She owes $450 in the security deposit? THat is what you said, but that makes no sense to me. Why should your landlady owe money in a security deposit? It is the tenant who pays the deposit, not the landlady.

    If the tenant is leaving, then she is owed the return of the security deposit (minus any repairs or whatever was agreed to in the contract).


    Did you give her any notice at all? Did you sign a lease? WHat are its terms?

    What do you mean by being "maliciously double-barreled in the pasture"? I am assuming injured, since you crawled out, but what is double-barreling and can you prove it was malicious?

    Really? You don't know what double-barreling is? The horse kicked out and nailed her with both hind feet.


    Sorry, would love to offer helpful feedback but I can't make any sense of your post.

    I suggest what others have already suggested, go to the police or the sheriff, whichever jurisdiction the barn is in, and ask them what to do.

    Sounds to me like you have gotten screwed, but legally, if there is a lease, there may be some requirement as to notice.
    I agree to contact the police and go to the property with their accompaniment.
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    15 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Well, can't go back on this, but call next time (if there is one, hopefully not); don't text. Texting over serious issues is a teenager's response to drama, a weak-sister way of dealing with confrontation, and a cop-out. And almost always go south.

    Says me. YMMV.

    Get the po-po involved, and research the landlord tenant laws in your state. Document. Good luck.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Yes. This is what I was going to advise also. Bring your bill of sale or other documentation of ownership of the horse as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Go back with the sheriff. If you've paid up to the end of the month then the owner has no cause to lock you out.

    When you go back be prepared to settle accounts, in cash if necessary (but get a receipt).

    Collect your horse and your stuff and get out of there.

    G.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2014
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    She got kicked by a horse and it was the horse who came at her not her getting in amongst a horse who was kicking. That is what she means by malicous double barreled


    3 members found this post helpful.

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