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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2011
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    117

    Question Conformation- Long Pasterns (With photo link)

    Interested in an OTTB with long pasterns- should I completely rule him out because of this or just be cautious? Opinions please Thank you! Feel free to judge his conformation in general too!

    Link: https://www.facebook.com/media/album...type=1&theater
    “A horse is the projection of peoples' dreams about themselves - strong, powerful, beautiful - and it has the capability of giving us escape from our mundane existence.”



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2011
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    Upatoi, GA
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    How many times did he race and is he sound?
    He's definitely not the type I would pick conformationally, but he has a super sweet face and I bet he will be quite handsome with weight and proper muscling. I tend to like short backed, compact, beefy TBs over the lanky type. Overall he just seems light boned, the pasterns are long/sloping and the left front tendon looks funny. (See how it bows out a bit in back?)

    But honestly, that might not mean a thing at all if he has raced 40 times and stayed perfectly sound.
    Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
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  3. #3
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    Nov. 28, 2011
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    Upatoi, GA
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    What about this one instead? https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...5681647&type=3
    Or the one called Salty Cheeks?
    Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
    Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
    Take us to print!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2009
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    Warrenton, VA
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    I would go see him, sometimes track shoes (toe grabs) can make the angles look worse than they are. Long pasterns are not a big problem if you have a otherwise correct horse and a good blacksmith and dont mind using bell boots.
    owner and friend of members of the Limping And Majestic Equine Society.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    17,657

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    I think he's lovely. He looks quite a bit better here:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...e=1&permPage=1



  6. #6
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    Sep. 28, 2005
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    NE
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    I bought one like that, and maybe I was just lucky, but he has never been unsound. I think it's more important to condition and keep them fit, but that should be true for any horse, I just know I'm always more concious of it. He does look cute !



  7. #7
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    Oh, and if you have not read this piece about Lord Avie, you should. He's this horse's grandsire, through his dam. Very nice old blood there.

    http://www.drf.com/news/lifelong-bon...otten-champion



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    19,072

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    There was a paper presented at the AAEP convention in about 2002 by Daniel (?) Marx or Marks. He's a very well respected sport horse vet, especially in the h/j world. He talks about what conformation defects are likely to adversely affect sport performance in a significant way and what conformation defects are not really that important. When he talks about pasterns, IIRC, he says that long pasterns with a good angle are not so bad. Short, upright ones ARE bad and should be avoided. When my computer finishes defragging itself, I will find the paper and quote the relevant parts.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  9. #9
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    Oct. 12, 2004
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    Ontario, Canada
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    I have a mare that retired sound after 95 starts and she has VERY long pasterns.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2011
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    117

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    You guys are all awesome! Thanks so much. What concerns you with the funny looking tendon? I'm going to look at him Saturday.

    Here's his pedigree: 24 starts, winner

    http://www.equineline.com/Free-5X-Pe..._name=Suddenly Sam&dam_name=Grandma Pat&foaling_year=2007&nicking_stats_indicator=Y
    “A horse is the projection of peoples' dreams about themselves - strong, powerful, beautiful - and it has the capability of giving us escape from our mundane existence.”



  11. #11
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    “A horse is the projection of peoples' dreams about themselves - strong, powerful, beautiful - and it has the capability of giving us escape from our mundane existence.”



  12. #12
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    Sep. 16, 1999
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    Ohio: Charter Member - COTH Hockey Clique & COTH Buffy Clique
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    9,143

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    Char's pasterns were long. She did have ringbone in both front legs (purchased in 93, left front diagnosed in 94, right front in 99, moved up to prelim in 2000). other than maintaining good, correct shoeing and, later, doing injections for the ringbone, she didn't have a problem with her pasterns.
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

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  13. #13
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    My little Ralph horse had ridiculous pasterns that were VERY sloped. My vet hated them, but they never were an issue. Whenever he was flexed, he flexed great up front, and I don't think he ever took a bad step in his short life.



  14. #14
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    Aug. 9, 2002
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    Fairfax, VA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    My little Ralph horse had ridiculous pasterns that were VERY sloped. My vet hated them, but they never were an issue. Whenever he was flexed, he flexed great up front, and I don't think he ever took a bad step in his short life.
    How long were Ralph's pasterns? Sloped pasterns are generally not a bad thing (nor are they predictive of future soundness issues), UNLESS the are overly long *and* sloped, which can lead to stress on the tendons, mostly the SDF. My mare's (front) pasterns are pretty sloped, but they are medium length, and her internal structures are perfect (at least according my vet, after many ultrasounds taken of BOTH lower front legs after her pasture injury a few year ago , my picky vet is nothing if not excruciatingly thorough.)

    Ringbone is usually more often associated with short, upright pasterns (unless it's as a result of an injury.)

    I would be more concerned about building his topline and working on raising the base of his neck with lots of correct basic flatwork, his "pins" look okay!

    Looking forward to reading the link provided by vineyridge
    "Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies."

    "It's supposed to be hard...the hard is what makes it great!" (Jimmy Dugan, "A League of Their Own")



  15. #15
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    Here's the quote from the paper that was presented:
    Front Pastern Conformation
    It is frequently stated that long sloping pasterns in the front leg predispose to suspensory and superficial flexor tendon strain. While there is an intuitive appeal to this, it is the author's experience that the opposite is more likely. Dr. Joe Cannon has pointed out that long upright pasterns in racehorses lead to a high incidence of suspensory apparatus injuries.(Footnote b) Dr. Ron Genovese agrees and observes that upright pasterns are also more frequent in horses that bow. (Footnote C) Horace Hayes says: "Long sloping pasterns are easier on suspensories and necessary on hard ground." (Footnote 28) The author has observed that long sloping pasterns in race horses (which are more common in stayers) are likely to run down, but otherwise are not a problem. Upright and especially short, upright pasterns, predispose to proximal interphalangeal joint disease. While not a common racehorse ailment, it is significant in jumpers and other performance horses. Top dressage horses must have some length and slope to their pasterns otherwise the suspension and cadence they require in their gait is not possible.
    I saved the paper, but here's the link.
    http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/aaep/2000/39.pdf
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  16. #16
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    Verrry interesting stuff! Thanks for sharing this link (as horsepeople, we all learn something new every day, and I love to read the newest and most updated studies--on anything and everything "horse related"...)
    "Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies."

    "It's supposed to be hard...the hard is what makes it great!" (Jimmy Dugan, "A League of Their Own")



  17. #17
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    Paper is from 2000, so it is not new. But it's not that old either. What made me save it is that the discussion of conformation is tied to function in different disciplines/sports.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  18. #18
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    Aug. 26, 2006
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    North Central Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by leahandpie View Post
    I like this guy a lot, but would be concerned about the right hock. Could be nothing serious but worth checking out.



  19. #19
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Doolittle View Post
    How long were Ralph's pasterns? Sloped pasterns are generally not a bad thing (nor are they predictive of future soundness issues), UNLESS the are overly long *and* sloped, which can lead to stress on the tendons, mostly the SDF. My mare's (front) pasterns are pretty sloped, but they are medium length, and her internal structures are perfect (at least according my vet, after many ultrasounds taken of BOTH lower front legs after her pasture injury a few year ago , my picky vet is nothing if not excruciatingly thorough.)

    Ringbone is usually more often associated with short, upright pasterns (unless it's as a result of an injury.)

    I would be more concerned about building his topline and working on raising the base of his neck with lots of correct basic flatwork, his "pins" look okay!

    Looking forward to reading the link provided by vineyridge
    They were pretty darn long for his diminutive size. I remember taking him into VEI for some back pain and Dr. Allen saying something to the tune of "Well, if you'd have asked me, I would have told you not to buy him," gesturing to his ungodly confirmation (he was also downhill and had a short, upside down neck. But he was dirt cheap and priceless to me, so, you know ).

    Like I said, the front end was never his issue. I don't know if I would seek one out like that, but if everything else adds up, then I wouldn't run screaming for the hills.



  20. #20
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    Apr. 17, 2012
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    I like him!



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