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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2004
    Location
    Goshen, OH
    Posts
    803

    Default How long after liming will it take for buttercups die?

    I put around a ton of pelleted lime down (by hand! ugh!) a couple of weeks ago. The buttercups here are thriving... I have tried spraying with 2,4,D last year to no avail. I think they were too old and well established from what I've been told, and I'm really not into spraying more chemicals in my fields! How long until I can hope to see some help from the lime? Maybe I need to add even more? (The field is just under one acre).



  2. #2

    Default

    they won't die that way.

    you have to spray them when they are less than 2 inches high....early early spring and you may have to go 3 years in a row to get them all

    however they are a sign of over grazing and a lack of other forages present...so one season of a drilled in fall cover crop would suppress 90% of them...

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
    Posts
    1,703

    Default

    Agree with Tamara. Focus on really promoting the growth of your grass and then it can work to choke out your buttercups. Especially for pastures with warm season grass, there's usually nothing else there to compete with the buttercups at this time of the year so they just go crazy. Timing of your herbicide application is key to killing them. For us, our winters are mild enough that we can usually spray in late Jan/Feb and get a big hit on them.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,693

    Default

    Buttercups also like compacted soil, so do what you can to aerate.

    Lime takes a while to raise the pH - months. Raising it will make it less hospitable for most weeds, but not all, and not entirely.

    Mow mow mow, when you overseed, use a no-till drill which 1) gets better seed/soil interaction and 2) serves to aerate. Lime as appropriate.

    It can take a few years to reduce a buttercup stand but it can be done.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2004
    Location
    Goshen, OH
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Well the field is basically a large dry lot and I do not want it pasture, so I don't really want a bunch of grass growing in it. I will aerate, and I do mow. I can't spray when the plants are still small in Feb/March because the field is literally standing water at that time of year. Sigh. I know the lime doesn't work immediately, I just wondered if it would even help this year? Other than liming and aerating and mowing, I really don't know what else to do. I hate these things!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2001
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    674

    Default

    Contact your local ag agency and they can tell you what to put out to get eliminate them. I used Chapparell last year on part of one pasture and it is a clean as it can be. I'm trying a product called Clean Pasture this year on a different part of a pasture. Grazon would probably get them wilting but I'd call the local ag agency.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,506

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hearts View Post
    Well the field is basically a large dry lot and I do not want it pasture, so I don't really want a bunch of grass growing in it. I will aerate, and I do mow. I can't spray when the plants are still small in Feb/March because the field is literally standing water at that time of year. Sigh. I know the lime doesn't work immediately, I just wondered if it would even help this year? Other than liming and aerating and mowing, I really don't know what else to do. I hate these things!
    Keep it mowed t the ground. Everytime it peeps up mow it down. You can even kill kudzu if you do that.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hearts View Post
    Well the field is basically a large dry lot and I do not want it pasture, so I don't really want a bunch of grass growing in it.
    roundup once for warm season and once for cool season and run a sharp disc to kill the other stuff at the roots

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hearts View Post
    I put around a ton of pelleted lime down (by hand! ugh!) a couple of weeks ago. Maybe I need to add even more? (The field is just under one acre).
    Yes. 1 ton of lime may not be enough if you have clay soil, or if the pH is really low. What did your soil sample say? Consider hiring a crop consultant.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2001
    Location
    Bryan,Texas
    Posts
    2,261

    Default

    Lime is not a hebicide. It is a soil ammender to get the ph in balance.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2004
    Location
    Goshen, OH
    Posts
    803

    Default

    We do have a lot of clay. I didn't even soil test because I know it needs lime, and I put down as much as I could afford with the plan of testing and following instructions this fall.

    jcotton, I know the lime doesn't kill the buttercup, but the buttercup does indicate the soil ph needs lime.

    I guess I will just mow this stuff to death and soil test this fall and just try to keep it under control. Sigh. Thanks everyone!



  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Hearts View Post

    jcotton, I know the lime doesn't kill the buttercup, but the buttercup does indicate the soil ph needs lime.

    I guess I will just mow this stuff to death and soil test this fall and just try to keep it under control. Sigh. Thanks everyone!
    but if you don't want anything to grow in a dry lot, why are you putting down lime to make the soil more agreeable to making things grow? and buttercup can grow and grow well in sweet as well as sour ground. They indicate overgrazing.

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,455

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    but if you don't want anything to grow in a dry lot, why are you putting down lime to make the soil more agreeable to making things grow? and buttercup can grow and grow well in sweet as well as sour ground. They indicate overgrazing.

    Tamara

    good point.

    if nothing is supposed to grow, there are better ways.

    Is that the dry lot that is flooded in winter/early spring?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
    Location
    Out in The Country
    Posts
    1,893

    Default

    I used some Weed and FEED not weed and seed like a month ago and it was the best thing I have tried on those buttercups - a woman at TSC pointed it out to me. It did kill off a lotof them and then I mowed it SHORT - buttercups are still coming up in that field but not where I weed-and-feeded it. Not sure the products official name sorry!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,427

    Default

    Just kill everything and put down stone dust. If your intent is to have a dry lot, there's no sense in putting anything down except stone dust or similar material to keep the place from turning into a mud pit.

    Lime amends the soil, and amending it can make it less hospitable to certain kinds of plants. It's not a weedkiller.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
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