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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    Default Septic system replacement costs?

    Those of you that have had to replace a septic system - what did it cost you, in total?
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  2. #2
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    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
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    2,191

    Default

    $20-60k

    There is a pretty wide range in size/design/etc.

    How many people is it for/year-round/what is your ground like/etc.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2001
    Location
    PA
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    1,837

    Default

    Are you replacing the whole system, or just part of it?

    What types of soils do you have?

    Do you have a replacement area available?

    All questions you need to answer when you talk to a contractor, and/or Sewage Enforcement Officer for your area.

    They are the best ones to answer this question. Here, a septic system can cost from $5000 to $25000. YMMV
    OLD FRIENDS FARM-Equine Retirement-We LOVE Seniors!! Spoiling Retirees since 1998
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  4. #4
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    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    We (homebuilders) can have a new system put in in rural Texas for anywhere from $5-10k depending. It really depends on your area, soil type, septic type, and restrictions/permitting/zoning for where you live.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    Default

    We're looking at a property that needs a new septic system, according to the listing agent. It's on 6 agriculture-zoned acres, flat and clear. At this point, that's the only information I have - from the sound of it, the entire system needs to be replaced. The house is a 2b/1ba, I'm not good with soil types but it's typical for the Willamette Valley.

    Just trying to get a ballpark figure to see if it's even worth a look. It's priced accordingly.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2008
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    73

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    We spent about $12,000 to replace ours last fall, doing much of the finish site work ourselves. That was replacing the tank and new Elgin leach system, 30 loads of fill as we had to go with a "semi-mound" due to clay ground and nearby swamp area. Cost $750 for the designer to come up with plan to go for town and state approval (another $300 for the state to put a stamp on it). If we had gone with a pricier contractor and hauled fill from alot further, it could easily have gone up to $20 k. This is for a 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, in NH, replacing 50 yr old system. Hope this helps!

    --nhhaflngr



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    6,213

    Default

    Is it the entire system, or just the tank?

    It definitely does depend on location. The contractor who was supposed to be emptying the septic before we moved in ended up digging through the top of the tank. It was a foreclosure, and by law the bank we bought from was required to replace the tank (though personally, I would have gone after the septic company!) and I believe it was far less than any of the estimates here - $1k-$1200 or so. Though that may have been just costs, as the septic company knew it was their fault there was a problem. Idiots drove their tractor over it and bashed through it with the scoop. Then didn't say anything and wouldn't have, except a neighbor called to let us know it was starting to puddle...
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    In our area you have to have 10 acres or more to be able to do the lesser/cheaper sewer system, but again, it varies by location, soil type, septic type, etc. You could probably get a more reliable ballpark by calling a local septic company and talking to them.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    Fanfayre is our local, resident COTH expert - but she's not on here that often.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    If I was buying a house needing septic replacement, I would want the work done before I move in - and I wold pay the fair price added for the work.

    We have one of nature's little miracles and it works for us, but if we sold, we would have a better chance of a buyer if the septic was replaced and inspected.
    It is not a hot acreage market right now and buyers have a lot of choice.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    9,586

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    When I bought my place the disclosure listed septic replacement as contracted prior to sale at a cost of $5K. This was in 2003.

    Actual installation took place after I assumed ownership & did not cost me a cent more.
    New tank, leach field & curtain drains included.

    I closed in December so the work could not take place until the following April when excavator/septic guy could dig.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    If I was buying a house needing septic replacement, I would want the work done before I move in - and I wold pay the fair price added for the work.
    Current septic is disconnected, so this would certainly be done before moving in, not an issue.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Where I used to live there was replacement vs new system and the rules were different, as was the expense. Anywhere from 5K to 35K.

    If the house is unused and the septic has failed then you might get stuck with having to put in a new one and meet new rules, which might need an engineered system, that isn't the guy with the backhoe usually, it's some guy with an environmental health degree or a civil engineer. He draws the plans, the backhoe guy puts it in, the county charges you for permits, etc. etc. etc.

    If I made an offer it would be contingent on being able to replace the system at all, which would require up front expense on my part so the place better be very much what I wanted.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    410

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    We're looking at a property that needs a new septic system, according to the listing agent. It's on 6 agriculture-zoned acres, flat and clear. At this point, that's the only information I have - from the sound of it, the entire system needs to be replaced. The house is a 2b/1ba, I'm not good with soil types but it's typical for the Willamette Valley.

    Just trying to get a ballpark figure to see if it's even worth a look. It's priced accordingly.
    Get an estimate. They are free. You may need to bore soil samples that will cost a few hundred dollars. If you want the property put an offer contingent on what the costs are and a total home inspection that way you have an out. In my state you cannot sell a property with out a proper working septic up to current codes.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    We're looking at a property that needs a new septic system, according to the listing agent. It's on 6 agriculture-zoned acres, flat and clear. At this point, that's the only information I have - from the sound of it, the entire system needs to be replaced. The house is a 2b/1ba, I'm not good with soil types but it's typical for the Willamette Valley.

    Just trying to get a ballpark figure to see if it's even worth a look. It's priced accordingly.
    I needed a new spetioc and I had lots of clay so they wanted to put in a 20K system. I asked them to bore more samples to possibly find an arae for the drain fields and for a feww hundred dollars more they did find a suitable spot and then the system was 10K



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    6,213

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China Doll View Post
    Get an estimate. They are free. You may need to bore soil samples that will cost a few hundred dollars. If you want the property put an offer contingent on what the costs are and a total home inspection that way you have an out. In my state you cannot sell a property with out a proper working septic up to current codes.
    I believe that is the case here as well. Given the fact it was a foreclosure and sold as-is, I don't think it would have been done if not legally required.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2003
    Location
    Yellow Point, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,037

    Default

    Sorry to be late to this thread, but here's my $0.02 :
    It depends - on soil type and overall depth, slope, watercourses, regional regulations and limitations, etc.
    I'd suspect anywhere from $7500 up, given your parameters. I've never been to the Willamette Valley, so I don't know the soils.
    What I CAN advise, however, is if you call up someone and they give you a straight price, say $15,000, over the phone, HANG UP AND NEVER DO ANY BUSINESS WITH THAT COMPANY. No-one with an ounce of ethics or knowledge can do that, as each system is so personal.
    As someone else mentioned, it's probably a good idea to have some test holes dug to see what you're dealing with and can then get a good idea of the possible costs of the system. Is it for sure the existing system is no good? Since it's been disconnected for a while, it may have had a chance to correct itself and might be good to go again with a clean out of the field and an upgrade to the tanks....
    Any other questions, feel free to ask away
    (thanks for the boost, Foxtrot's; you're sweet)
    Another owner of A Fine Romance baby who has grown up and joined the fun!!!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,957

    Default

    Well, at least now I know what I'll need to know, if we get that far. No questions have been asked yet, but I'm making a list (thanks to COTH!)

    The place IS priced fairly, given the needs. I know property values vary by region, but we're talking <100k for a stick-built (1935) livable house on six and a quarter flat, clear, usable acres. There are some other factors (such as whether or not the plumbing and/or wiring have been updated, or will need to be) that may come into play, and I believe it's a short sale (yes, I have the time for that). Multiple existing structures could easily be horse-ready with very little work, plenty of room for hay/equipment storage, and it's fenced (and flat as all get out). It's sandwiched between hay/crop fields in a good rural area that is still close enough to the town I work in, and the main highway. So far, it's the closest-to-ideal place we've seen.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Posts
    313

    Default

    What China Doll said:
    Get an estimate. They are free. You may need to bore soil samples that will cost a few hundred dollars. If you want the property put an offer contingent on what the costs are and a total home inspection that way you have an out. In my state you cannot sell a property with out a proper working septic up to current codes.


    What ReSomething said:
    If the house is unused and the septic has failed then you might get stuck with having to put in a new one and meet new rules, which might need an engineered system, that isn't the guy with the backhoe usually, it's some guy with an environmental health degree or a civil engineer. He draws the plans, the backhoe guy puts it in, the county charges you for permits, etc. etc. etc.

    If I made an offer it would be contingent on being able to replace the system at all, which would require up front expense on my part so the place better be very much what I wanted.
    And what fanfayre said.

    If the house is 1935 vintage, the septic system may very well be, too. Requirements change and you need someone official to tell you what they are now. Existing sites may be grandfathered in but if you have to replace one, you'll probably need to meet the current code.

    Would base any offer contingent on what you find out, what it costs, and what else a house that old may need.

    All flat, in the Willamette Valley? Have you had normal rainfall up there this winter? I'd be very curious how dry it might be, which could affect horse care as well as septic issues.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2006
    Posts
    188

    Default

    We had to redo septic as part of the sale. It was around 10K ten years ago. It has a pump (and an alarm) because the drain field is slighter higher. Some properties we looked at had a sand filter. I seem to remember they might be more expensive? Can't recall. Something we factored in when looking at bare land.



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