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  1. #1
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    Default How to take good pictures of feet?

    I want to take some pictures of my horses feet to post them on here for some advice. We've been dealing with medial-lateral imbalance in her hind feet and I suspect a "negative plantar angle" or whatever it's called.

    However, if I'm going to be taking pictures I want to be able to take them so that the feet are portrayed as accurately as possible.

    So any tips? Advice?

    TIA



  2. #2
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    Default

    The pictures that are going to help the most are called xrays.



  3. #3
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    You need the camera at ground level.

    You need the horse standing square, on a flat, level surface, with the cannon bones vertical.

    You need the camera absolutely perpendicular to the view you are shooting, whether that's front, side, or rear, or solar
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    You need the camera at ground level.

    You need the horse standing square, on a flat, level surface, with the cannon bones vertical.

    You need the camera absolutely perpendicular to the view you are shooting, whether that's front, side, or rear, or solar
    Thanks for the tips.

    I will take the photos for my own use, but have changed my mind about posting them here.

    And Herbie, thanks Captain Obvious!



  5. #5
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    No need to get snippy Karosel, but the fact that you expect someone to determine P3 alignment with photos makes me think that it's NOT obvious to you that you need radiographs. The farriers on this board as good, but they don't have xray vision. If you're that concerned get some films. Then you will get some great advice.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie19 View Post
    No need to get snippy Karosel, but the fact that you expect someone to determine P3 alignment with photos makes me think that it's NOT obvious to you that you need radiographs. The farriers on this board as good, but they don't have xray vision. If you're that concerned get some films. Then you will get some great advice.
    What makes you think I "expect someone to determine P3 alignment" from a photo and that farriers have x-ray vision? Where did I say that? How do you know that I don't already have x-rays?

    My question was how to take good photos of feet. Not how to diagnose a negative plantar angle. Perhaps I wanted to post both photos and x-rays?

    And I got snippy because you did.

    Perhaps my response would have been better if you had worded your "advice" better. Maybe something along the lines of, "I don't have any advice on how to take good photos, but the best way to determine if there is a negative planter angle is with x-rays." I found your post to be snippy, and putting a behind it doesn't change it.

    Anyway, it doesn't really matter now. I won't be posting pictures/x-rays, I'll continue to work with my vet and farrier. I was really just planning to post on here to talk "horse" and to see what other people have done to manage unbalanced hind feet etc, and not looking for COTH to replace vet/farrier care.



  7. #7
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    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  8. #8
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    ahhh perfect!! Exactly what I'm looking for. Thanks caballus!



  9. #9
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    Default

    Unfortunately in the "from the side" photo the horse is not standing with his cannon bones vertical so that is not a good example to use for reference purposes.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    Unfortunately in the "from the side" photo the horse is not standing with his cannon bones vertical so that is not a good example to use for reference purposes.
    Do you mean the side picture of the whole body? or the side shot of just the hoof and pastern?



  11. #11
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    I can't speak to which Rick was referring to, but it doesn't matter LOL The cannon bone of the leg you are shooting needs to be vertical. And, the horse needs to be standing squarely so he is weighting each hoof as evenly as his conformation allows.

    I do suspect he was referring to the body shot, as it's nearly impossible (probably totally) to determine the angle of the cannons in the hoof-only views.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  12. #12
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    I am going to sound sniptastic but:

    Some posters think shampoo is poisonous to horses when applied in the normal manner

    Some say geldings have no bone marrow

    some say horse's tails are one long bone

    some say feeding salad is the answer!

    Are all of those sources, what you need to aid your horse? I don't know.

    etc etc etc...


    Would you be better off with a good vet's opinion and the farriers who will actually work on their feet ? Do you have a farrier/vet who will work with 'I read it on COTH?"

    That is not supposed to sound snarky, I'm being quite serious in asking: do you think you'll gain something useful? I would imagine you know who's opinion you really seek: So, PM them.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karosel View Post
    We've been dealing with medial-lateral imbalance in her hind feet and I suspect a "negative plantar angle" or whatever it's called
    Quote Originally Posted by Karosel View Post
    Where did I say that? How do you know that I don't already have x-rays?

    My question was how to take good photos of feet. Not how to diagnose a negative plantar angle. Perhaps I wanted to post both photos and x-rays?
    Ummmmmmmm...ok. A little confused but whatever.

    Something folks are not bringing up are camera lens. 50mm is most close to what our eye sees in real life. If you shoot any lower than that you'll have a wide angle view (which can create distortion or flared appearance), and if you shoot higher you will distort as well. For solar shots I shoot directly overhead (not off to the side AT ALL) and then I also lift the foot and take solar shots from the side. I think I've asked for hoof advice with photos once on here before it went into a train wreck and frankly, I don't know who has good advice and who doesn't (some I listen to but others I would discredit and they may actually be the best with advice, I just might not be aware of it). Xrays and a farrier and vet that talk to each other are going to be much better help than photos posted on the internet. Just saying.



  14. #14
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    No need to get snippy Karosel, but the fact that you expect someone to determine P3 alignment with photos makes me think that it's NOT obvious to you that you need radiographs. The farriers on this board as good, but they don't have xray vision. If you're that concerned get some films. Then you will get some great advice.
    Actually, a farrier who is *well trained* in reading and mapping the outer foot can tell a LOT about the insides, including medial lateral balance, and often get really really close in assessing the
    P2- P3 alignment.
    Certain external hoof references are consistant and very revealing to the farriers trained in reading them.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  15. #15
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    As for the pictures make sure the foot is on level flat ground , a hard surface like concrete is best . Camera needs to be ON the ground pointing straight at the side of the foot for the lateral view.
    For the sole view, camera should be pointing exactly perpendicular to the center of the sole, not angled at all .
    Those are the two most useful views .
    I don't use a view from the front of the foot because the hoof capsule can have too much flaring and distortion that may not reflect the true medial lateral balance of the bones inside. The sole view is more revealing in that regard. A view of the heels from straight on behind taken with camera at ground level *sometimes* is helpful.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaimebaker View Post
    Ummmmmmmm...ok. A little confused but whatever.
    Read the title of the thread and you'll be less confused. I asked how to take good pictures of feet. And then in the paragraph of the post explained why I wanted to take the pictures. I didn't ask "can you please diagnose my horse over the internet because I'm a cheapskate and don't want to pay for proper vet or farrier care."

    Would you be better off with a good vet's opinion and the farriers who will actually work on their feet ? Do you have a farrier/vet who will work with 'I read it on COTH?"

    That is not supposed to sound snarky, I'm being quite serious in asking: do you think you'll gain something useful? I would imagine you know who's opinion you really seek: So, PM them.
    To reiterate, I was asking how to take good photo's just ask other people's (specifically the farrier's on here) opinion and experiences. It doesn't mean I'm going to march over to my farrier and demand he shoe my horse according to Joe Blow on COTH. It was simply to talk "horse" on the internet. That is all.

    Anyway, thanks to everyone who gave me advice about taking good hoof pictures. I've tried taking some pics before and they didn't turn out at all. Even if I don't post them here I'll have them for my own reference.



  17. #17
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    If you 'suspect' something going on with the insides of the foot the xrays will tell you or help point you in a better directions. A good farrier can look at the outside of the foot and tell a lot as Patty mentioned. If you wanted to know JUST how to take good pics of the feet then you should have made your title and said 'title says it all' instead of going on into more stuff which warranted the responses you got. But you want to post and bite folks heads off that want to help??? I even mentioned lens and distortion but apparently your head is too far up your rear to say a nice 'thank you'. So yeah, have fun with your thread. I'm sure folks will be pounding the keyboard to help such a venomous, ungrateful poster.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaimebaker View Post
    If you 'suspect' something going on with the insides of the foot the xrays will tell you or help point you in a better directions. A good farrier can look at the outside of the foot and tell a lot as Patty mentioned. If you wanted to know JUST how to take good pics of the feet then you should have made your title and said 'title says it all' instead of going on into more stuff which warranted the responses you got. But you want to post and bite folks heads off that want to help??? I even mentioned lens and distortion but apparently your head is too far up your rear to say a nice 'thank you'. So yeah, have fun with your thread. I'm sure folks will be pounding the keyboard to help such a venomous, ungrateful poster.

    You missed this part:
    Anyway, thanks to everyone who gave me advice about taking good hoof pictures.
    Thank you Jaime Baker for your advice on lens distortion.

    And yes I should have not mentioned the extra info until I had the photos and x rays ready. However, I thought mentioning why I wanted to take the photos (suspected negative plantar) would warrant specific advice on how to take photos for a 'suspected' negative plantar.

    And yup I have been venomous. I'm sorry. I should have waited to post for another time when I'm in a better mood. I'm extremely sensitive about the (perceived) insinuations that I'm trying to use COTH to diagnose my horse instead of using vet care, since I've been treating my horse twice a day since the beginning of November for a dental surgery (flap sinusotomy for a molar repulsion) and a severe sinus infection that is not going away. And also facing the decision of whether or not to euthanize my heart horse. And to top it all off some jerk backed into my driver side door of my car last night and drove off. So yeah, I've had a chip on my shoulder all weekend. I should have waited to post for another day.

    My apologies.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Stiller View Post
    Actually, a farrier who is *well trained* in reading and mapping the outer foot can tell a LOT about the insides, including medial lateral balance, and often get really really close in assessing the
    P2- P3 alignment.
    Certain external hoof references are consistant and very revealing to the farriers trained in reading them.
    What Patty said on reading the hoof^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Take'n the photo.......Be sure the film plane/back of the camera is perpendicular to the hoof view you are takeing.
    Especially the sole plane. Focal length and f stop and exposure is important as well as good natural lighting. Avoid flash unless you are using it as fill lighting recommended. ( usually in sunlight) Or no fill light if taken in Northern light exposure.

    Or just adjust camera to Auto point and shoot and hope for the best.
    Hope that helps.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care



  20. #20
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    That's a pretty bad week and I'm sorry you are having it. I understand posting a hoof question and already setting yourself up to be on the defensive too (I've done it myself before) and I know how aggravating it is to post a question and then have one little sentence that folks focus on for the rest of the discussion. So I understand. Apology accepted, hope your holiday season gets better and more stress free and good luck with your horse



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