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  1. #1
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    Jun. 1, 2003
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    Default Timing. Does it get better?

    Time has become an issue for me but let me say, this is the first time I have ridden at my level of dressage and we have come a long way in a year. Previously, I was a dressage lover who rode hunters and low jumpers. So tell me, or rather, reassure me, timing gets better with practice, right? My timing is off with Canter/Walk transitions, so I do not always get what I want, even though my horse is more than capable of it. I am one to think WAAAAY far ahead and I want to be sure ( ) that I have the timing for onetempis and canter zigzags. And yes, I am willing to work, practice and make my body do what it needs to do to get there... just looking for a little faith at the moment.
    ~Amy~ TrakehNERD clique
    *Bugs 5/86-3/10 OTTB Mare* RIP lovely Lady, I miss you
    *Frodo '03 Anglo Trakehner Gelding*
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2004
    Location
    NW CT
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    837

    Default

    Yes! You're aware of the need for it, you have the desire and you're willing to work on it. So, yes definitely!
    The aids are the legs, the hands, the weight of the rider, the whip, the caress, the voice and the use of extraneous circumstances. ~ General Decarpentry
    www.reflectionsonriding.com



  3. #3
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    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Triangle Area, NC
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    Default

    yes. it will develop, don't worry.
    but you have to work at it!
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  4. #4
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    Jun. 1, 2003
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    The Shake and Bake State
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    Default

    I do, believe me. I do. I really want to be good.
    ~Amy~ TrakehNERD clique
    *Bugs 5/86-3/10 OTTB Mare* RIP lovely Lady, I miss you
    *Frodo '03 Anglo Trakehner Gelding*
    My Facebook



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2009
    Location
    Colorado
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    738

    Default

    Absolutely! One of the biggest things my internship instructor works with me on is timing, and in the past 6 months I feel like I have improved. I think learning timing is one of the most time consuming aspects of riding to learn/improve. You'll get it!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
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    5,306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bugs-n-Frodo View Post
    So tell me, or rather, reassure me, timing gets better with practice, right?
    My trainer reassures me that riding regularly at least 4 times a week will definitely improve timing.

    I am COUNTING on it!!
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=
    Dressage becomes art when it is a joy for the horse. -KBH

    Mighty Thoroughbred Clique Now on Facebook ... ... show the loff



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2006
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    3,505

    Default

    They are YOUR limbs! Take control of them things

    Ok, I totally cant talk after being back from baby Im a glob of jello!!!

    I always try to ride horses that are a little more difficult (big movers) and use that to shape me up and make me "handier". Thats what my trainer calls it (her translation of better timing)and its such a bad sounding word but it means like handy man handier. Able to perform the task! lol

    Cheers to us all becoming handier! lol



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    5,929

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
    They are YOUR limbs! Take control of them things

    Ok, I totally cant talk after being back from baby Im a glob of jello!!!

    I always try to ride horses that are a little more difficult (big movers) and use that to shape me up and make me "handier". Thats what my trainer calls it (her translation of better timing)and its such a bad sounding word but it means like handy man handier. Able to perform the task! lol

    Cheers to us all becoming handier! lol
    As long as it's not handsier!


    I like the term - when a horse can negotiate tight turns and lengthen and shorten as needed jumping, it's called handy. When a horse has a lot of skill working cattle, it's called handy. Why can't the term apply to riders, too?
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  9. #9
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    Jun. 1, 2003
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    Default

    Well, I am out there three mornings a week, before sunrise, so I can ride before work, and I ride both days on the weekend for a total of 5 days. Come on body, let's do this!
    ~Amy~ TrakehNERD clique
    *Bugs 5/86-3/10 OTTB Mare* RIP lovely Lady, I miss you
    *Frodo '03 Anglo Trakehner Gelding*
    My Facebook



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
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    215

    Default

    Yes, riding a lot helps, but riding mindfully is even better My horse is finally strong enough to do walk/canter, and what improves my timing is knowing where his hind legs are all the time, so that I can ask at the right time. Close your eyes and see if you can determine which hind leg is coming forward, and then check yourself in a mirror (if you're lucky!), or using shadows from our "Mister Sun" or the arena lights. His legs have to be in the right place to answer your question correctly.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2009
    Location
    Arizona
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    Default

    I am in the same boat and really want to improve my timing. My instructor is working with me on timing of not just when I plan an upcoming movement or transition, but almost more importantly, those unexpected times when I need to respond quickly and give corrections. One of the tips she gave me in my last lesson is that even if I miss the optimum time for a correction, to still give it, even if I'm late. Ultimately, giving the corrections at the perfect time will make them all but invisible, but like she said, you don't get there without practice, so keep on doing it and that's how we'll get quicker with them to the point where eventually they'll happen before we even have a chance to think about it! She also added that as they get quicker, they'll get more subtle as well. Looking forward to all of that, lol!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2011
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    410

    Default

    I'm right there with you. Timing is sometimes the only difference between success and failure for me. I often know exactly what I want to do but miss the half second window of opportunity to apply the right aids at the right time and I end up with something sloppy.

    My timing and feel are getting better but only after months or work. I'm going to start riding 4-5 times a week instead of twice a week starting in January. I'm really looking forward to the improvement in my riding from just spending more time in the saddle.

    I've gone from being able to the count on one hand the number of times I've ridden a horse to solid training level in less than two years, riding twice a week. I've only really begun to pick up on feel and timing in the past 6 months.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2008
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    382

    Default

    Timing is tough. It is something you have to learn by trying and failing over and over. I think the failure is such a necessary part of figuring out timing because you have to know the boundaries of when your aid will have an unintended consequence. So it is not wasted time by any means. And at the higher levels is isn't so much taught as it is learned because the timing has to be so exact. Does that make sense?

    I'm working on my 3's and 4's right now and for the left to right change I have to ask a tiny bit earlier than my right to left change. My instructor can't tell me exactly when to put on the aid, I just have to keep practicing until I find it and can repeat it consistently.

    Another area I struggle with is finding the timing in the canter piros. Getting the right amount of jump and energy, keeping the neck loose, staying firm in the saddle with the right amount of half halt. If I even pull a smidgen on the reins versus contain the energy my horse will stop. The body coordination is very hard for me.

    Keep trying. You will get it!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
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    The Prairie
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    God I hope so....
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2006
    Location
    NC
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    Default

    YES!! About two months ago, I was convinced I was never going to get good canter-walk transitions on my boy. I know it was all me as they were beautiful with my trainer aboard. Now, I can get good, clean ones about 75% of the time. It will come!!



  16. #16
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    Jun. 13, 2001
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    usa
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    Default

    It develops as much as your are told how/when/WHY to use the aids, and according to the standards to which you are held. The development of timing is JOB ONE for the instructor and rider. And it is always about pulsing the aids, not just fixing them in x place. Also the balance which the horse is ridden in allows it to be ABLE to REACT properly, which is also a key part of methodology and theory application.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  17. #17
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    Jun. 1, 2003
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    Default

    I was told to try and think of can-na-da during my canter work to feel the rhythm and keep track of the foot falls, and it works for me, very well, but most of the time I get a VERY nice canter halt transition, rather than walk. It is not because I give too much rein aid because if I do, he will lean on my rein and I won't get an uphill transition. I believe I need more leg and less half-halt (through the seat) but I am still feeling out the degrees. I totally get the comment about needing to make mistakes to really feel what I need and when I need it, and how much.

    This stuff is hard, enjoyably hard, but hard. My trainer is from Germany and has shown both dressage and jumping and she always says that she can ride 3 jumpers to one dressage horse. LOL
    ~Amy~ TrakehNERD clique
    *Bugs 5/86-3/10 OTTB Mare* RIP lovely Lady, I miss you
    *Frodo '03 Anglo Trakehner Gelding*
    My Facebook



  18. #18
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    As long as it's not handsier!


    I like the term - when a horse can negotiate tight turns and lengthen and shorten as needed jumping, it's called handy. When a horse has a lot of skill working cattle, it's called handy. Why can't the term apply to riders, too?
    I do like the term as well


    Timing is a tough one! One horse I am going to be riding until April is a freisian that is really great with his hind leg (not always you see that with these big guys ), but Im gonna half to keep up with my trainers aids because she wont be riding him anymore and it will be SUPER obvious if he gets lazy behind again (YIKES!).

    She said she wants a video in month or so to make sure I keep that hind active lol, talk about pressure! lol



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