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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    937

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    I flip the bales on their ends when I get them into the position I want, and then cut all the twine off.
    Nin-I have found there is less fighting around the hay huts than there was when I used the tombstone type feeders. And the horses will put their head and neck all the way in to get those last few pieces of hay when the bale is almost finished. This is what I really like-the horses do finish right down to the bottom.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,901

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    Quote Originally Posted by muffintop View Post
    Wow those things seem very expensive, especially if you need more than one and it seems that most people would. What about the Big Bale Buddy. I bought one of these and i can honestly say they are amazing and well cheaper than the hayhut. we are on our second round bale and literally only lost an armful of hay on our last bale.
    Yes, I've thought about those, too, but I wondered if one person could put the bale buddy on by themselves. I think I've heard that it's better with two people. Plus, how would my little 12 hh donk ever get any hay?

    Cheaper is better if I can make it work!



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2011
    Posts
    147

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    Alabama...the BBB are SUPER easy to put on by yourself. I did it the first time we got it so there is no problem there. They are kind of tall when the round bale is first put in there but i don't think your donkey would have a problem as the bag is very "flimsy" (but in a good way!) I highly recommend these things. I did buy a large piece of plastic and some rope to cover it now that it's getting colder and dewy in the morning.



  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luckydonkey View Post
    Funny that on the add they are $725 and the one on craiglsist locally is $800 used.
    I just set one of these up today and covered a 1100lbround bale. (for 2 horses)

    Regarding the 800 craigslist price.. that may be good IF you don't have a dealer near by. Shipping will cost a lot if you can't go pick it up yourself.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

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    Our feeders are 525 but it costs about 150 to 200 each to ship - they must ship by freight - so I would assume the huts would be the same or more as they do not ship from a US facility like ours do.



  6. #26

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    In our case there was a load being delivered to a dealer. We made arrangements to meet the truck on the way back. (they left one on for us) so while we did have to drive 3 hours to meet the driver, and because there isn't a dealer in our area, we were able to get one quick without too much trouble.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2007
    Location
    Bawston
    Posts
    166

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    We have a hay hut. I think I would buy it again. We actually put it on a solid pallett so the chaff would not fall down and then get moldy. Our is also on a slight incline so we would be dreaming if we thought the water wouldn't run under it. Our minis eat out of it just fine so I don't worry about them getting it. We feed square bales in it. it gives you peace of mind that there is hay that isn't trampled and soaked available.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,606

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    We use the Duplessis feeders, and have done so for 6 winters with great success.

    The first winter we did put the bale of hay on a pallet initially, but after a while that became a pita; the pallet would freeze to the ground, and the chaff built up inside it.

    Now, the bale goes on the ground with the feeder on top, and the horses eat every scrap and morsel of hay.

    Five horses, and I prefer two feeders, spaced well apart, so no-one misses out.

    Duplessis are great to deal with. The feeders don't last for ever - the plastic does break down eventually, in the sun, so don't get fobbed off by a dealer who's had a feeder sitting out on the lot for a couple of years and still expects you to pay full retail!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

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    The BBB is only easy if yours is a little too big. Ours is tough to put on, with two people. Depends on the bale you are dealing with - you can run into Goldilocks issues !



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2004
    Location
    Still here ~ not yet there
    Posts
    6,670

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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    The BBB is only easy if yours is a little too big. Ours is tough to put on, with two people. Depends on the bale you are dealing with - you can run into Goldilocks issues !
    I agree. Even the manufactor states the first few times can be tough even with 2 people. And they were! I doubt I would have been able to do it myself at all.

    As for waste -- depends on your horse(s). For me it worked great in one pasture and there was only a few handfuls of dropped hay.

    But if you have a horse who likes to pull the hay out, then drop it on the ground, THEN eat it (or not...), the BB doesn't work any better than any other sort of round bale feeder when it comes to reducing waste.

    Since in my case, I DO have one of those horses, woe is me. In the end I went back to small bales and sold the BBs.

    However, I have to say the customer service was wonderful! 2 of my 3 units got tears in them (btw, they come with a 1 yr. warranty); just little holes, like less than 2 inches across. I reported them to the maker, sent them photos of the damage and they sent me 2 brand new bags without quibbling. AND I got to keep the 2 torn ones!

    Apparently I must have some pretty rough horses -- they said the damage to the units in the first year is only about 1%.

    I also looked at the Hay Huts, but the cost was ridiculous to me.

    Another great thing about the BBs is how portable they are...if need be you could roll them up & tie a string around them and take 'em anywhere you needed to.



  11. #31

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    I also looked at the Hay Huts, but the cost was ridiculous to me.
    It wouldn't look so bad if you were in the rainy south in the winter time. So far after a week of use, we've had heavy down pours and the bale is about 25% gone with two horses eating from it and dry dry dry.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
    Location
    Jawja
    Posts
    1,456

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    We just got ours set up today. My wonderful husband put it together and once assembled was a piece of cake to flip over onto the round bale which we put on a plastic postal pallet. For a pasture with four horses, two of which who want to be dominant, I really like all the shape of the hut and windows. No one is scuffling over the hay. Debating about getting a second one. Feeding 7-9 horses this winter, I've gone through 250 +/- square bales already and paid out $2200 for hay so far this season. Whereas had I been feeding 4 round bales per month from Oct to Apr, my cost would only be $1320, IF I used that many.
    Let us ride together; blowing mane and hair; careless of the weather; miles ahead of care...Fat Cat Farm Sport Horses



  13. #33

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    What do you think of the material and quality?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
    7,085

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    Love, love, LOVE my Hay Hut. I bought it around Thanksgiving as an early Christmas present to myself and the Boyz, and it's terrific.

    Its worth was tested immediately, as I stuck a round bale out and then we had three days of driving rain. The hay stayed dry, even with the horizontal rain, and the horses ate it right down.

    My mini donk has no problem getting what he needs (actually more than he needs--he's in a grazing muzzle because of the Hay-Hut-of-Plenty ).

    Hay is at a premium this year, and while I gulped at the initial investment, I figure it will earn back its worth in a year or so. I really love that I'm not seeing tons of hay wasted while my horses use it as a toilet.

    Tha material and quality are good. I find that it is just heavy enough (the horses can push it forward with their chests if they are really trying to get those last scraps). The edges are clean and not sharp.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,365

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    Interesting article on hay feeding systems:

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/horse/c...round_bale.pdf



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    937

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatCatFarm View Post
    We just got ours set up today. My wonderful husband put it together and once assembled was a piece of cake to flip over onto the round bale which we put on a plastic postal pallet. For a pasture with four horses, two of which who want to be dominant, I really like all the shape of the hut and windows. No one is scuffling over the hay. Debating about getting a second one. Feeding 7-9 horses this winter, I've gone through 250 +/- square bales already and paid out $2200 for hay so far this season. Whereas had I been feeding 4 round bales per month from Oct to Apr, my cost would only be $1320, IF I used that many.
    My husband has modified my hay huts this season to make them even easier to use.

    On the sides that have the 'seam', he screwed a piece of 2 x 4, the width of the side, along the bottom of the hut, on the inside. This has given it more stability when flipping it back over the bale of hay.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
    Location
    Jawja
    Posts
    1,456

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    Quote Originally Posted by mht View Post
    My husband has modified my hay huts this season to make them even easier to use.

    On the sides that have the 'seam', he screwed a piece of 2 x 4, the width of the side, along the bottom of the hut, on the inside. This has given it more stability when flipping it back over the bale of hay.
    Good to know and I'll keep that in mind.

    Honestly, I balked at first at the cost of the thing, but after giving it some thought, thought it made the most sense for our winter weather and the number of horses that I keep. I bought 9 of the small weave, slow feed hay nets about 6 weeks ago and while I like them alot, they are very labor intensive and with me working full time and getting up early to feed horses before my 62 mile each way commute and then doing it again when I got home, it was just killing me. That and shelling out $650 every 6 weeks for a 100 bales of hay delivered. So if this saves me time and wasted hay ergo, money. Then I'm all for it. The quality does seem to be very good. The huts are substantial and the system seems to work very well. So far, I am pleased.
    Let us ride together; blowing mane and hair; careless of the weather; miles ahead of care...Fat Cat Farm Sport Horses



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
    Posts
    1,655

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Interesting article on hay feeding systems:

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/horse/c...round_bale.pdf
    This is very interesting. Right now, I feed mine without any feeder - I have considered a tombstone, but unless those bars are spaced wide enough apart there's no way I'm going to risk getting a hoof stuck in such a thing. I don't seem to experience 57% wastage - I just cleaned up the paddock from the last bale today and there was nowhere near half the bale still sitting there. My round bales are 1400-1500 pounds and they eat it fast enough (5-7 days) that there isn't much loss to them peeing on it. I roughly calculate there is about 15% of the bale wasted. I only have one mare who looks like she's about to explode, so I'm heading to Calgary in the next few days to pick up a feed muzzle for her... oooh won't she be pleased with me (NOT)!
    https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2007
    Location
    Jawja
    Posts
    1,456

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    Tomorrow my husband is picking up our second and final Hay Hut. We got the first one put together and over a round bale last weekend. We bought two round bales and put them out; one covered by a Hay Hut and one not; both on plastic postal pallets on their sides. I personally leave the strings on to try and hold the bale together as long as possible and just trim and retrieve them as the bale is eaten. We had rain on Tuesday and the bale within the Hay Hut remained fluffy and dry. Of course the uncovered one is wet. There are four horses on the bale with the Hay Hut and at first three but now just two (a big Percheron mare and her weanling colt) on the uncovered bale.

    Both bales have been pulled apart about the same amount, however, the spread apart hay in the Hay Hut is nicely contained within the hut, whereas the uncovered bale has a widening area of loose hay spreading around it. Between being covered and contained, I can certainly see where the Hay Hut will save me dollars by keeping more hay contained and edible and therefore lasting longer. There continues to be very little hay spillage/wasteage outside of the Hay Hut the four geldings are using.

    We also had 30 mile an hour wind gusts associated with this last front that came through with the rain. The Hay Hut didn't budge, nor have the geldings pushed it around. Also no evidence of rubbed manes. I also like that the Hay Huts are attractive and unobtrusive in the pasture.

    I'll have just under $1600 invested in the two which is a chunk but I am anticipating that my hay bill for next year will be considerably reduced and that they'll pay for themselves in a couple of seasons.

    For my situation where both my husband and I work full time; are often on the go our entire weekends; my husband is not the handiest guy; nor a horse person; and we didn't have to modify a fence line; get on each others nerves while building a feeder shed set-up of our own; worry about rusting metal; netting the bales; the bales getting wet; or an enterprising gelding wearing a hay ring as a necklace (yes, a friend's Friesian actually managed that feat); they're worth the price for the peace of mind and ease of use.
    Last edited by FatCatFarm; Jan. 19, 2012 at 11:31 AM.
    Let us ride together; blowing mane and hair; careless of the weather; miles ahead of care...Fat Cat Farm Sport Horses



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,572

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    So far I have been pleased with ours also
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



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