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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    5,868

    Default Who here hs a Coverall/Clearspan type arena?

    Am seriously considering this, what can you tell me good/bad or that you would have changed? How long have you had it and how has it held up? Am talking to Clearspan, has anyone worked with them? Any info appreciated, I know a good bit about them, yes I know they "rain" in the AM often when cool at night etc.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,531

    Default COVERALL ` MATERIAL ARENA ?

    While everyone loved their coverall arenas ~ it was my understanding that Coverall went bankrupt last year ~

    I know there was a thread to "this" last spring I think and I was glad we did not go that route ~

    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  3. #3
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    Coverall did go bankrupt, but Clearspan is in good shape! That is who I am dealing with. They are a different company and have been in existence for sometime. I have a small Clearspan building I use for hay storage.



  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    8,531

    Default oh good ` glad to hear

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    Coverall did go bankrupt, but Clearspan is in good shape! That is who I am dealing with. They are a different company and have been in existence for sometime. I have a small Clearspan building I use for hay storage.
    Great glad to hear this GOOD LUCK ~

    An indoor changes one's entire "winter" outlook or mood
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  5. #5
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    I have priced metal ones and honestly the Clearspan is BY FAR the least expensive alternative. Also they offer a lease/purchase option which is very attractive! I jsut have to decide if I can truly swing it and if I will really get more business from it (I know it will allow me to keep teaching/training in bad weather with existing clients, which is a probem, but will I attract new people???)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
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    6,840

    Default

    I don't own one, but boarded at a farm that had a ginormous one. Pros:

    1. Super light inside, even on cloudy days (and that's most of the time here).

    2. Cool and comfy on hot days, but not cold on cold days..if that makes sense.

    3. Very open and inviting.

    4. Quiet, even in pouring rain and hail, unlike metal roofed arenas.

    Cons:

    1. Can be "flappy" if anything is loose. This barn had roll up metal doors, and they tended to rattle with little provocation. Can spook a spooky horse..but that happens with our current traditional arena now.

    2. Can be confining, with no view outside, unless you get roll up sides or ends. Horses can hear and sometimes see shadows outside, so placement might help with that. I like the ability to have a cool breeze and an outside view as a rider, and my horse appreciates it, too.

    3. Snow can slide off in big "whooshes", but that happens with any arena.

    4. Long-term, I think they covers might need to be replaced more often that a conventional metal roofed arena.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    4,272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Cons:

    1. Can be "flappy" if anything is loose. This barn had roll up metal doors, and they tended to rattle with little provocation. Can spook a spooky horse..but that happens with our current traditional arena now.

    .

    IF the door has wind lock guides the door will not rattle



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2002
    Posts
    997

    Wink

    We installed a 72 x 140 foot Coverall arena 4 years ago and could not be happier with it. We live in Southern Ontario and gets lots of snow etc so the structure of the building was most important to us. This building even in heavy winds does not make a noise at all.....our arena ends are built with traditional steel supports and siding (with Lexan windows) rather then the fabric ends which do tend to billow in the wind.

    Although Coverall did file for bankruptcy last year another company was started (funny enough by the same people that ran Coverall) and our warranty is still intact. Service and support is excellent.

    Price wise our Coverall when completed was about the same price as a traditional steel sided arena but the huge advantages of riding inside this building rather steel ones convinced us.

    I would not have changed a thing if I had to build again.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
    Location
    Apex, NC
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    677

    Default

    I don't know personally anything about the buildings, but from a business standpoint, maybe bringing in more, is it feasible if you had the indoor, that you could open your farm up for schooling days during the winter? I know of several folks that try to go to places that do this and have indoors for the winters. That could help pay for it too?



  10. #10
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    My indoor is not going to be big enough to have a LOT of people in there at one time, Will roughly be the size of a dressage arena, so opening for "schooling days" doesnt' really make sense. Plus parking in the winter will be limited, as the fields are usually too wet to park. I would consider letting people pay a fee to haul in and ride, but dont want a BUNCH of people on a given day! Not worth the hassle!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    40,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    My indoor is not going to be big enough to have a LOT of people in there at one time, Will roughly be the size of a dressage arena, so opening for "schooling days" doesnt' really make sense. Plus parking in the winter will be limited, as the fields are usually too wet to park. I would consider letting people pay a fee to haul in and ride, but dont want a BUNCH of people on a given day! Not worth the hassle!
    Remember your insurance needs may change with how you use your property.

    If you "let people in to ride", you will need to up your insurance and if you charge for it, even more, so double check what those costs would be and sure they are worth to you to spend, so others can ride.



  12. #12
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Remember your insurance needs may change with how you use your property.

    If you "let people in to ride", you will need to up your insurance and if you charge for it, even more, so double check what those costs would be and sure they are worth to you to spend, so others can ride.
    Not a concern, I already run a teaching/training establishment with haul in students. I would not let just anyone come ride, pretty much my students that need some additional time in winter



  13. #13
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawneeAcres View Post
    Not a concern, I already run a teaching/training establishment with haul in students. I would not let just anyone come ride, pretty much my students that need some additional time in winter
    Good, then that is covered already, pun intended.

    I will question why, when the cost is comparable, would anyone build something that will need to be maintained and replaced at a considerable work and cost, when a metal barn will stand there practically forever without any maintenance?

    For what I hear, the further South you go, the more careful you need to be about how you finish those covered buildings, or they are ovens in warmer weather and in the South, we have way more warm than cold weather.

    In Canada, yes, maybe you need all the light and warmth you can get, but in the S of the US, maybe not.

    I think it was Guilherme that posted having ridden in some fabric covered arenas in the South that were unbearable, but maybe they were not made right for the area?

    Some years ago we considered building one of those for our dog shows and quickly nixed that after talking to others that had them, even if the company was giving us a great discount if we let them use it for advertisement.

    Then, one of those may just be best for you.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Good, then that is covered already, pun intended.

    I will question why, when the cost is comparable, would anyone build something that will need to be maintained and replaced at a considerable work and cost, when a metal barn will stand there practically forever without any maintenance?

    For what I hear, the further South you go, the more careful you need to be about how you finish those covered buildings, or they are ovens in warmer weather and in the South, we have way more warm than cold weather.

    In Canada, yes, maybe you need all the light and warmth you can get, but in the S of the US, maybe not.

    I think it was Guilherme that posted having ridden in some fabric covered arenas in the South that were unbearable, but maybe they were not made right for the area?

    Some years ago we considered building one of those for our dog shows and quickly nixed that after talking to others that had them, even if the company was giving us a great discount if we let them use it for advertisement.

    Then, one of those may just be best for you.
    SUmmer use is not a priority for me, we have a 250 x 140 outdoor arena that is FINE in the summer months. This is basically for winter riding when it is raining, too wet, frozen etc outside. Even then would only be used when necessary, as, for example yesterday and today, my outdoor has been FINE for riding/lessons. Perhaps may use it a bit for evening riding in summer months, but I jsut don't see us using it that much. Also I have plans to make the "pony wall" which is a "wooden wall" base be like a regular arena fence, with gaps between the boards to allow for airflow, as well as it will have two large rollup doors on each end which will give a flow thru "breeze". Although we are hot and humid here, we generally have a pretty good breeze most of the summer months. But again, not really intended for intensive use during the summer.

    In addition the cost is NOT comparable! I have priced several metal structures and the cost for JUST the building, without erection is about what the Clearspan will cost for materials AND erection/labor! Plus if I make the decision within the next few weeks they are willing to give me a 5% discount which is significant on a structure of this size!



  15. #15
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    Oct. 13, 2002
    Location
    Idaho USA
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    Default

    We saw one in WY that had been absolutly shredded by the wind. It stood there in shreds for a number of months before it was again usable.

    My DD has a friend who has a 6 yr old Coverall. It is big and roomy, light, all that stuff, but they have had one major tear in the cover and a recent smaller tear.

    I would want to know more about the life span of the covers.



  16. #16
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Lucama, NC
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    Default

    They supposedly give a guarantee on the covers and will replace them, I know my small building has a tear and they are going to replace that one.



  17. #17
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    Jun. 12, 2009
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    Default

    Boarded at a place with one. never again. When the snow comes off it can sound like a jet is landing on top of you. Otherwise it was light and airy. Comfortable tempwise. But in winter useless for me.



  18. #18
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    Sep. 16, 2010
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    In the windmills of my mind
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    88

    Default

    I left a $15K deposit on a Coverall building last January and had it returned by the company when they went bankrupt as they said they could not fill the order nor offer a proper warranty at the time. Things may have changed since then, but they never recontacted me to try and sell me one. I also looked at clearspan and the cost was going to be quite similar for equivalent structures.

    The price was only going to be about 10% less than a pole arena or steel arena, once everything was said and done. A good part of the cost of an arena is levelling, footing, foundations, wiring and kick boards. Those are going to be roughly the same for any building. We initially thought the Coverall was going to be about half the cost of a steel building, but once we added all that stuff to the bare bones tent structure, it didn't make much difference. We have 20 year old Coverall sheds around the neighbourhood and they re showing their age but still functional. I gather they need to be professionally tensioned every once in a while. With the longer lifespan of a permanent, non fabric structure, I think I'd be going for the extra cost and do a steel one with a lot of skylights.

    However, I'd love to board at a place where one was, so that many could share the cost. I've ridden in the fabric arenas and the light is wonderful, airy, the next best thing to riding outside.
    If it ain't broke- TRAIN IT!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Dolores,CO. Proud to be a Kraut
    Posts
    2,148

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tuppysmom View Post
    We saw one in WY that had been absolutly shredded by the wind. It stood there in shreds for a number of months before it was again usable.

    My DD has a friend who has a 6 yr old Coverall. It is big and roomy, light, all that stuff, but they have had one major tear in the cover and a recent smaller tear.

    I would want to know more about the life span of the covers.
    I built a Coverall arena for our local handicap org. Coveralls recomendation for foundation and footing was well a little shabby. According to a ing that I hired it would not have lasted.
    Coverall service was more than misserable.

    The trick with the fabric buildings is the foundation and how well you stretch the skin.
    They do not handle any foundation shifts, it will tear the skin.
    The skin has to be tight as a drum, the stretching takes days and weeks of readjustment.
    Special care has to be given to the beam joints, all sharp corners need to be removed and the joints additionally covered with foam pads and Helicopter tape.
    Any smal tears and cuts from construction have to be taken care of emidiatly.

    Construction is fast and easy, I had that building up in 3 days after the foundation and footer were done, 70x100. I had 4 guys helping me and I did not miss Miller Time once.

    Fabric, skin, schould last at least 15 years.
    I know several CoverAlls in my erea, about 15, that are in good shape, 10 years old and older. 3 used the CoverAll recomandation for footer and foundation and can not be used in winds over 20 miles or during snow load time.
    That I have no use for them, does not mean, that I don't know them and don't know how to use them.
    Caveman extraordinair



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2002
    Posts
    997

    Thumbs up

    As with every building good workmanship counts. There are bad installations of steel arenas as well. And foundations for any building must be stable....

    Our arena has NEVER been tensioned in any way, shape or fashion since the day we installed it. And our temps go from low -30 C to well over +35 C every year. Our fabric roof is as nice and taught as ever. I have never seen a Coverall fabric shred or tear (and I checked out a ton before we purchased ours). If the building is built to your local building code I really don't see how this could happen.

    And many times a "Coverall" arena is not the real thing. There are many, many cheaper imitations out there that basically look the same. The cost is reflective of the true premium brand of building. As with everything it is buyer beware but everyone I know loves their arenas and Coverall buildings.



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