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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,747

    Default Best sand for arena?

    I plan on putting in an outdoor arena and am looking at what type of sand is best ie not too heavy and not too light.

    TIA
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,376

    Default

    Washed, angular river sand seems to work the best. Make sure you put your money into a base that is French drained, and geoclothed, with plenty of gravel on top. No matter how nice your footing, if the water won't drain, it won't be rideable around here. An addition of rubber granules makes for a really nice ring, and there's a rubber granulator in Marysville.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,747

    Default

    Thanks so much!
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  4. #4
    erinkath Guest

    Default

    a riding surface depends on the amount of traffic, budget, and activity going on (jumping, dressage, cutting horses?)
    I agree with Calvin, if you do not have a proper base construction and drainage, you dont have a ring. There are many companies that build rings. I would recommend Tilton Enterprises.
    Also, if you cannot irrigate your footing there are many problems that can occur including the footing being too deep and not giving the horse support that it needs.
    For a jumper/ dressage ring...The stronger the sand material (quartz, silica) the less it will break down and be dusty (therefore last longer) also the finer and more consistant particle size the better it will hold moisture, yet drain properly too. The smaller particles are also less harsh on a horse's hoof. Angular particles vs. round river sand will knit together better and if you really have money to spend, there are many fibre products (like GGT) that can be mixed in to create a root structure to the footing and help with water retention and support.
    Proper grooming practices and drags are also very important to maintain the footing, base and see that it drains properly...there is no such thing as maintenance free footing.
    I recommend doing alot of homework on this as it is a huge investment and can also benefit your horses greatly when it is a supportive, yet forgiving riding and jumping surface.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2007
    Location
    Sultan WA
    Posts
    884

    Default

    Erinkath has given some good information, but seriously - look for someone who is actually in YOUR area, not in North Virginia. PM me for a referral, if you need one
    Homesick Angels Farm
    breeders of quality Irish Draught Sporthorses
    standing Manu Forti's Touch Down RID
    www.IrishHuntersandJumpers.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,376

    Default

    PNWJumper has a nice outdoor sand ring in your area (well, in the Puget Sound on the Peninsula) so probably has some good ideas and sources, too. Give her a PM, she's a lovely person to get to know
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Dear JackSpratsmom,

    Please invest $15 in USDF's Underfoot booklet before building your arena. It's on the USDF website, hunt around you will find it.
    The sand (last 2-3 inches on top) is best if it's a "putty sand"...material that is not round beach or bank run sand but material with some angularity/sharp edges so that it has some clumping or putty ability. For pricing just remember that every inch rise of material over a standard arena(200 ft x 70 ft) will total over 40 cubic yards or about 3- 14 yard truckloads at approx. $200-300 per load.

    George



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    4,017

    Default

    My ring contractor was very specific...Contractor Grade Sand...the stuff they use for cement. Very white in color....no beach sand.
    And I get complments on my foot all the time and asked about my sand.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,479

    Default

    We have pink quartzite sand (i.e. pink footing)! It is an angular sand.

    It is not a super fine sand, but I like it a lot. Beach sand is a disaster--rounded = slippery.

    I also recommend Underfoot.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    Aiken sc
    Posts
    62

    Default

    All of the responses are very good.
    I also recommend speaking to an arena consultant in your area that is familiar with the local silica sands that are available ,especially if you are going to mix any amendment products like GGT -Footing


    http://www.ggt-footing.com/


    here are a couple sand experts who might be able to assist you :

    Christopher C. Calhoun

    General Sales Manager
    Best Sand Corp.-Chardon, OH

    Telephone: 1-800-237-4986 Ext. 255
    Fax: (440) 285-4109
    Cell Phone: (216) 403-5410

    Email: chris.calhoun@fmsand.com
    Website: www.fairmountminerals.com




    Target products
    Shane Roth
    Sales manager Golf Division
    403-615-5661
    sroth@TargetProducts.com
    Cynthia Brewster-Keating
    NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER
    GGT FOOTING
    GGT-FOOTING -http://www.ggt-footing.com/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    Aiken sc
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Sand is the foundation of every good footing. But not every sand is suitable for riding arenas.

    When installing a new arena surface, the question arises if you really save money by choosing cheaper sand. The right sand is certainly a good investment and we are happy to consult you.
    There is an enormous variety of sand qualities out there. The combination of all these sand quality factors decides whether the sand is suitable as footing or not. Sand which is well suited for an indoor riding arena might be completely unsuitable for an all-weather outdoor riding arena. Choosing the wrong sand can create a lot of problems and in the long run can be very expensive.

    Sand impacts the condition of the surface. If the surface is hard, the horse will shorten its stride to minimize jarring and modify his jumping form to avoid the sting of landing. Hard footing will also stress his joints. If it's too soft, it'll strain his soft tissues - tendons, ligaments and muscles. If the footing is slippery, the horse will feel insecure, so the horse will move cautiously.

    Good footing is safer for your horse and boosts his confidence.


    another hyperlink to view

    http://www.dressagearena.net/pages/articles.html



    Sand quality and specifications

    Why is the right sand so important?

    Sand is the foundation of every good footing. But not every sand is suitable for riding arenas.

    When installing a new arena surface, the question arises if you really save money by choosing cheaper sand. The right sand is certainly a good investment and we are happy to consult with you. There is an enormous variety of sand qualities out there. The combination of all these sand quality factors decides whether the sand is suitable as footing or not. Sand that is well suited for an indoor riding arena might be completely unsuitable for an all-weather outdoor riding arena. Choosing the wrong sand can create a lot of problems and in the long run can be very expensive.

    Sand impacts the condition of the surface. If the surface is hard, the horse will shorten its stride to minimize jarring and modify his jumping form to avoid the sting of landing. Hard footing will also stress his joints. If it's too soft, it will cause strain to his soft tissues - tendons, ligaments and muscles. If the footing is slippery, the horse will feel insecure, and so he horse will move cautiously.

    Good footing is safer for your horse and boosts his confidence.

    Choosing the correct sand for your arena.

    Sand is a common ingredient in many arena surfaces and ranges from very fine sand .075mm to very coarse 2.00 mm. Sand alone may be used but it is often combined with other particle sizes and other materials. Adding the proper depth of sand is a key factor. Too deep of sand can cause stress and injuries. Not only is the depth a factor in how the sand performs, but particle shape and size plays an important role as well. Newly laid sand contains air pockets that absorb shock and rebounds. However, sand will erode, breakdown forming dust particles, and compact into an unsuitable surface over time.

    Choosing the correct sand for your arena may not be as easy as it seems. Most of us are limited to what is available in our area. Trucking sand in from long distances can be extremely costly. So we usually settle for what is available to us locally. This is where footing additives can help solve many of the dilemmas associated with local sand.

    Shown above are three types of sands ranging in size and shape. The photo below consists of Fines, Masonry and Concrete sand. Please keep in mind every quarry across the country will have different names and types of sand. Be sure to use the specifications and sizes to determine what sand you will need and not the names

    Fines.

    Fines, clay and silt can be very small and promote dust. The size of the fines in this photo are between .075mm #200 sieve - .15mm #100 sieve. If you have fines, our GGT Textile footing can help absorb the fines and net the footing together, greatly decreasing dust and loose particles that can be such an annoyance, and even a health hazard. To learn more about our GGT Textile horse arena footing, click here.



    Masonry Sand.

    particle shape can vary from round to sub-angular. Particle size here is between .3mm #50 sieve - .6mm #30 sieve. GGT Textile and ProTex work very well for this type of sand. Helping to stabilize the round particle and netting the sand together for more traction.


    Concrete Sand.

    Concrete sand is usually angular to sub-angular in shape. The particle size varies between 2.0mm #10 sieve - .3mm #50 sieve. ProStride and ProTex arena footing will help keep these type of sands from compacting, creating voids and adding cushioning to the surface.


    Sand Particle Shape
    The second most important component is aggregate particle shape. Sharp angular materials i.e. manufactured sand or stone dust are more prone to compaction, yet drain well and have good traction. Sub-angular particles have had edges broken off or worn down, so they don't fit as tight together leaving voids in the surface, reducing compaction. Round particles will roll, and not compact because all the edges have been worn off, therefore creating more voids. Round particles have more voids, therefore offering more cushioning, however they are very unstable and will not provide any traction. Particles need some angularity to offer resistance to movement between them.


    Angular Sub-Angular Round
    For new construction arenas.
    Building a professional base is always best. However, this can be very expensive and in today's economy not always possible. If you have the funds to build a professional base, you will have more options for what types of footing you can use, and your arena will perform much better over a long period of time. Again you may be limited to what sands and aggregates are available in your area. To determine what type of footing you will want on the top coat, get different samples for your local pits. See the suggestions above for the different sand types and footing additives.

    For existing arenas.
    If your base is not perfect, or if you are not able to install a professional base, or you want to use your existing sand, there are some options for you to improve your riding surface. Adding GGT-Ffooting can help stabilize, and improve traction for arenas that do not have a perfect base. The right type of sand mixed with GGT-Footing, can create a barrier that will support the hoof, minimizing the indentation into the surface. This mixture will certainly help arenas that have poor bases, broken down and dusty fines or deep surfaces. Sand size suggestions are .25mm - .090mm sub-angular shape for GGT-Footing. If you have fines, the GGT-Footing will absorb some of these small particles and reduce dust. If you have larges particles look at either ProStride or ProTex.

    If you are interested in having your sand analyzed to determine what footing is right for you, please send us a small sand sample to:

    Premier Equestrian
    8385 South Allen St.
    Suite. 101
    Sandy, UT 84070

    800-611-6109



    Be sure to include your name and telephone number and we'll be happy to help you!
    Last edited by aikenhorses; Aug. 13, 2010 at 12:48 PM. Reason: added phone



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