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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
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    164

    Default Sale barn

    I posted about my gelding a few weeks ago. I have decided to sell him. My trainer does not have the money to buy him. I do not believe the trainer will honestly try to sell him to someone else. I am wondering about sale barns. I know barns are different. If you have used one could you tell me about it? I want to know costs, commissions, training, how to find them, and anything else to know.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,006

    Default

    where are you located ?

    What does the horse do ? At what level ?

    Do you want to price the horse cheaply, competitively, or at a 'dream' price ?

    Is the horse 'ready to go' or does it need more training to be safe for strange riders to hop on and try ?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,291

    Default

    The toughest thing about selling a horse is that once you have decided you don't want to own him any more, you must do more work, spend more money with him to get to be without him.

    So questions. Do you care about selling price or do you just want him gone?

    Does he need minor work-- a tune up under saddle or some fitness, no work, or major training?

    If/when you look around for a sales barn or to put him in training with a pro who will market him, my advice is to find someone who already sells horses like him. That means similar quality, discipline and price. You also need to figure out of they are honest-- a little bit hard but you can ask for referrals in addition to just meeting them in person and checking out their operation.

    But do get the terms of the sale, who pays what while the horse is there and how commissions work in writing. The people who sell horses "well"-- meaning they sell a lot and stay in the business long term-- won't have a problem with this. In fact, they'll probably have answers to all of your questions about paying, time to sale, commissions, etc.

    Sorry to hear that you have to make a move to get this horse sold. But you might as well start your search for the right pro to market your horse sooner rather than later.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
    Posts
    164

    Default

    I am in the east. This horse is very talented. He is young and pretty. He is fit but right now can not be ridden in competition. Riding him at the barn is fine as long as you do not grab the reins and hold on.

    I got him at a good price and I would like to get that back. I am looking at sale ads and I do not see why he can not bring that. Do you just ask around for a sale barn? Do they advertise? I know that horses go "there" but I do not know where "there" is. I do not want him so far away I can not check on him.

    Would I be better to find another trainer to sell him? I do not want him with another bad one. Wherever he goes I will need to check it out.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nylonalter View Post
    Would I be better to find another trainer to sell him? I do not want him with another bad one. Wherever he goes I will need to check it out.
    earlier you said you did not think your trainer will work to sell him and now you mention this? Is this the same trainer?

    Ummm... upper end sales barns are usually just regular trainers who are good with marketing and working to buy and sell, not taking in unknown sale horses and marketing for a quick flip. The ones you see at higher prices are marketed at actual and active show barns by show trainers-and usually are taken to shows.

    I often think the term "sale barn" indicates something that really does not exsist off the very, bottom level of the business. Not at all what actually happens in dealing with show horses at fair prices to show buyers.

    I'd just go visit other trainers in your area and talk to them. Most will want board and training fees to keep the horse sharp and marketable and a written contract defining who pays what.

    And beware believing what those ads say the price is. That does not mean they are worth it or that they will get it. Never believe anybody who buys one paid the asking price listed in an ad either. Most are fine letting everybody assume they paid the advertised price.

    Maybe a good idea to move anyway if you don't think your current trainer is working for you as they should. There are others. Most are as good or better. Some alot better.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
    Posts
    164

    Default

    I did not understand "sale barn". I thought there was a barn "somewhere" that just worked to sell horses. I was thinking about using another trainer in the area that I don't know about. I think you mean the same thing find8.

    If I send him somewhere that will mean I leave. I will not have a horse there. I am refusing to let them train and sell the horse. I will not be welcomed back. That will stop the problem.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2004
    Posts
    1,399

    Default sales

    there ARE places that people refer to as sale barn because primarily that is what goes on there

    with that said, you do need to be pro active is communication with these people because usually they tend to fall off the map at times

    they are places that have lessons and show, etc. so your horse might be used for that which sometimes is good and other times not

    there are also trainers that are very good with sales and are known for having volumes of sale horses but, they usually have to be of good quality and often you are expected to pay upkeep, etc..

    either way you name the price you want but, expect to be asked to neg. and the sale person will make their money on top of what you get paid and you will not know that amount sometimes

    there are a few that still follow the % rule but, again you won't know for sure so be prepared for many different things to happen

    and finally, it's typical for you to have no communication with the actual buyer on most occasions



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
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    Default

    Yeah, sounds like a good plan. Good time of year for it too. You can go to watch anybody you are considering at a show first and see how they treat people in general and their clients in particular, that's the best way to find somebody. You can talk to those clients as well, ask them how they like things.

    Who knows, you might end up seeing a big improvement on your gelding and yourself and hang on to him.

    There are no "sale barns" that operate like a car dealer where you park what you are selling until it sells in a barn that does nothing else except buying and selling. Just regular trainers who are good at marketing while the horses are in their regular training and mangement program-and those programs are well respected or other trainers would not deal with them when buying or selling.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,083

    Default

    What about David Hopper?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
    Posts
    164

    Default

    He is a little bit far away. Otherwise he would be fine. I will look closer before I send him where I can't check on him.

    Thank you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2008
    Posts
    4,266

    Default

    David Hopper tends towards the middle to higher end show horses, jumpers etc iirc. I know competitive riders who buy from him.

    At the cheaper end there are dealers like Strain Family Farm that tend to sell kids horses, trail horses, western horses and all-around entry-level to midrange riding horses.

    With each sale barn it's a matter of a business deal - they have to feed and care for the horse until it is sold, and exercise/train it, so someone has to pay for that. In some cases they may buy the horse from you, then resell it. In other cases they may expect you to pay to keep the horse there until it is sold, and there is an arrangement as to who gets what part of the sale price, too.

    The main thing is to look within your discipline - what does the horse have skills/training to do, for example? If it needs some kind of remedial training to be safe, that might limit your options/pricing.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2004
    Location
    Sergeantsville, NJ
    Posts
    2,540

    Default

    Sue Metzger at Metger's Meadow Farm in Bordentown (or that general area) of NJ. She sells mid-range horses to a wide variety of clients. If I recall correctly, you pay "training board" on the horse for its care and exercise to keep fit until it sells. Then you pay a commission on the sale. I've bought some nice horses through Sue - she's as reputable as they come. She is purely a sale barn - metzgersmeadow.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
    Posts
    164

    Default

    If I do WP, where would I find a sale barn/trainer? Not in my area, in case I need that.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2004
    Location
    Sergeantsville, NJ
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    2,540

    Default

    I think you might need to narrow down where you are to a more precise location: Central NJ by the Horse Park, upstate NY by Albany - you get the idea...



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2008
    Posts
    391

    Default Where in the East are you?

    There are a lot of options in Virginia/Maryland/North Carolina. If you just want him sold I would send him to someone very successful and deal with the cost which can be upward of $1,000 a month. Since he doesn't show right now, I would send him somewhere cheaper that have a level of clientelle for such a horse but it will probably take longer to sell him. It just all really depends on how quick you want to get him off your hands and how involved you personally want to be. There are also lots of threads about potential places to send your guy. Good luck



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
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    31,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nylonalter View Post
    If I do WP, where would I find a sale barn/trainer? Not in my area, in case I need that.

    Check your appropriate breed magazine and local association newsletter and/or go to a shopw and ask around. Most breeders can point you in the right direction too. You will have to call them or personaly ask, most don't advertise strictly sales. usually just their program and recent winners.

    Might also check the point leaders in WP, WR and Trail in your area. Track down where they train. They will also take sale horses assuming you pay the fees associated-and they are in a better position to market since they do show.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2004
    Location
    ocala,florida....the place to be!
    Posts
    3,059

    Default

    here is a low down of consignment costs for me(not adverting) just trying to give you a ballpark figure of what it might cost. consignment board is 750.00 per month includes feed,hay and stall, shavings, and 4-5 rides a week. all marketing websites and showing horse to all clients.farrier,vet or any additional needs are paid forbuy owner as well. can be horse shown for show entry and day rate. but all sale barns are different, so it really depends on where and if it is with a pro.good luck with your horse
    www.camaloufarms.com

    ride it like you stole it! "ralph hill"



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2010
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Check your appropriate breed magazine and local association newsletter and/or go to a shopw and ask around. Most breeders can point you in the right direction too. You will have to call them or personaly ask, most don't advertise strictly sales. usually just their program and recent winners.

    Might also check the point leaders in WP, WR and Trail in your area. Track down where they train. They will also take sale horses assuming you pay the fees associated-and they are in a better position to market since they do show.
    I do not want to say where I am. Trainer may lurk on this board. I am not in an area that is a lot of WP, though. I would like to be close, but I see it may not work.

    I will check magazines. That is a good idea. Thank you for all the PM's as well.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Why don't you just try to sell the horse yourself?

    Hire a photographer to take professional photos of your horse and a videographer to take video of you horse. Put the video on Youtube. Make sure you get good conformation shots and action shots. Make sure the video isn't a lot of walking, it's need to be short and to the point. Before doing the photos and video make sure your horse is clean, trimmed and nicely turned out (clean tack).

    Put an advertisement up on the online horse classifieds, horse related websites, craigslist and any of your local print publications. Print out flyers and take them to any local show ground and tack stores. Put the word out that your horse is for sale.

    When people contact you about trying the horse out if you don't have the time to meet with them if there someone other than your trainer that you can hire/entrust to show your horse?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2010
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    1,224

    Default

    Without reading every previous post....

    I perfer the term "consignment." Normally when you send a horse somewhere on consignment basis, it's with a trainer with a good reputation, and a very good client base.

    It can go both ways--sometimes the trainer will take the horse and just takes said horses expenses (board, training rides, etc.) out of sale price and sends remainder to owner. Or, the trainer will take the horse, but still charge board and training and take a set commission.

    At my barn, when I take a horse on consignment, the owner still pays training board. I only charge a 10% commission. If the horse isn't at my barn and I am marketing it, organizing people to come see it, etc. - I charge a 20% commission. That way the owner knows exactly whats going on and there is no question about $$$ and commission charges.



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