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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    6,813

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntertwo View Post
    She put me on 40 mg of Strattera, which after a week, I do not feel any different. Just got a new script today to take 40 mg morning and noon, so we'll see how that works.

    If not, we'll try another med.

    Hang in there while you get that straightened out. I think I'm on my second or third med over the years (can't remember AADD). I think I've got Straterra now. A low dosage, and if I am lacking concentration in the afternoon I can take a second dose. It's funny, at first I couldn't feel a difference either, and then I missed a dose, and I really noticed the difference. Which means it WAS working, but didn't feel like a dramatic change until I went back to the disorganisation I had been dealing with prior to treatment. Concerta was working for awhile, but I would get heart palpatations under stressful situations.
    The more perfect our happiness,
    the more nagging and wretched
    do our unsolved problems seem.
    ~ Gordon Grand



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2006
    Posts
    505

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    Diagnosed when I was 35. I was always a pretty high-acheiver - good grades in school and college. I earned an advanced degree and a decent job.

    But the anxiety just kept ratcheting up. No matter how well I was doing, I wasn't doing enough. Sleeping became a problem. Combine that thinking with a bad boss, and hello, clinical depression.

    It was my psychologist who suggested I might have adult ADD. I didn't believe her, but I took the test she offered, and she referred me to a psychiatrist.

    So now I'm on Prozac for the depression, and Adderall for the ADD, and my only regret is that I didn't figure this out sooner!

    My job is still hard, and stressful, but I can deal - thrive even. It's wonderful to be able to FOCUS and actually get stuff done without the constant battle to stay on task.

    The Adderall is a serious "upper", so I have to watch caffiene intake, and make sure I remember to eat during the day. But it wears off pretty fast, so I'm "normal" by the time I'm home or at the barn.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    2,887

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    Quote Originally Posted by rugbygirl View Post

    I am pretty much textbook. My favourite example is how in grade school I could be finishing last night's social studies homework (in French), reading a novel under my desk (in English) and listening/understanding the teacher well enough (in French) to half-@$$edly finish whatever assignment was up. Not a word of a lie. Except Math, where I listened carefully, because Math was interesting. Besides medication, I have to be extremely careful about sleep patterns, exercise, diet and alcohol use. Not saying I'm a pinnacle of health, but I do find myself concentrating on "boring" stuff much better if I am in intense exercise 3+ times per week (I mean intense, like playing full contact rugby or kickboxing...not feeding bales to horses), eating a minimum of processed carbs and avoiding most alcohol.

    Sleep disruption is a super common symptom (often one a person has been dealing with for years, so they think it is normal.) If you regularly get a solid 8 hours and wake up refreshed, now is the time to look at treatment. If your sleep is constantly disrupted, start there. It takes discipline to get that 8 hours, let me tell you...I was a chronic insomniac for YEARS.
    You just described my DD. She is an Aspie and also ADHD, medications so far have more or less done a number on her, the only thing that has delivered consistent, effective help is...wait for it...Horses. A gluten free diet seems to be a help for her too, she is only a couple of weeks into it and not totally on board but she knows she feels better when she gives up most everything processed and eats mostly fresh fruits and veggies. She eats a bowl of peas every mid-morning and green beens or spinach every mid-afternoon. I guess I did something right lol!

    When I took the TOVA when she was diagnosed I came in the mid-range. They didn't test my DH but they should have...he is textbook too. My kid was doomed!
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    828

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    I was only diagnosed after my son was. I was 40 and had been labeled an "underachiever" all during school, had an up and down college career, depending on whether or not I was interested in the subject material, and found that riding was the one way to find quiet and peace. As a teacher, classroom noise and activity made it almost impossible for me to concentrate. What a difference a little pill makes! Like the others have said, I don't really notice a 'difference' when I am on the ritalin, but sure do when I forget to take it. I only wish that the diagnosis had been made when I was a kid - sure would have made a difference in my life both socially, emotionally, and intellectually.
    And a side note: every year I see two or three kids in my class who are undiagnosed, but obviously ADD or ADHD. Their parents either refuse to believe it or refuse to do anything about it. I feel so sad for those kids because I see the negative reactions that they get every day from their peers and from their teachers and I KNOW how much happier they would be and how much better they could preform if only they could get a little help.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    900

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    Do you think ADD and bi-polar can be confused?
    Become a Posse and help keep kids on horses and off the streets.
    http://www.comptonjrposse.org/



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearhunter View Post
    Do you think ADD and bi-polar can be confused?
    Yes they can. When I was diagnosed with ADD, my Doctor said the eval was sort of a toss up between the two, but the medication would tell the tale. If the ADD meds made me more anxious, then he would have known he was wrong.
    The more perfect our happiness,
    the more nagging and wretched
    do our unsolved problems seem.
    ~ Gordon Grand



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    2,352

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    OK, I'm going to address a few things first that have been stated incorrectly regarding the diagnosis of ADHD/Adult ADD as well as stimulants:

    1. ADHD/Adult ADD is not a spectrum disorder, and it is not being "looked at" as such. I'm not certain why this was stated, but there is no confusion regarding attention deficits and autism.

    2. Stimulants, as a class, are short acting and get into your bloodstream immediately. Unlike SSRI's, which need to build up in your system for 4-6 weeks, stimulant effects can be seen within 30 minutes of taking them; if not, the dosage needs to be adjusted or a new type needs to be tried.

    3. Adults with ADD typically are "inattentive type". Adult ADD is diagnosed in adults by doing a psychosocial and determining if the person had it as a child, if not, we look at what other thing may be going on, as it is not likely that it is Adult ADD. Depression and Anxiety are the two that we often rule/out.

    Anyone that begins taking a stimulant should do-so only with a psychiatrist or an astute PCP, as your BP has to be monitored very carefully; if you have any heart conditions, you may be asked to have an EKG done for a baseline. Do not be alarmed by this, as it is to protect you.

    There are some behavioral changes you can make, so seeing a therapist along with medication management is optimal for best results. Many adults with ADD have difficulties with work and relationships as a result of the disorder, so don't feel as if you're alone. Someone also mention that there is a high rate of comorbidity with Adult ADD and anxiety and/or depression. This is very true and can make medication management all the more fun!

    Let your trainer know when you feel comfortable, as it may help them think of ways to teach you differently - such as having them make sure you are making eye-contact with them when they explain the order of the fences you're supposed to take but can never- oh look! a butterfly! - remember.



    If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
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    2,887

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eye in the Sky View Post
    OK, I'm going to address a few things first that have been stated incorrectly regarding the diagnosis of ADHD/Adult ADD as well as stimulants:

    1. ADHD/Adult ADD is not a spectrum disorder, and it is not being "looked at" as such. I'm not certain why this was stated, but there is no confusion regarding attention deficits and autism.
    Thank you for stating that. My daughter was diagnosed with both years ago and while they may be somewhat similar...they are worlds apart as well. Both need to be addressed on their own in our case.

    [QUOTE=Eye in the Sky;4967817]
    3. Adults with ADD typically are "inattentive type". Adult ADD is diagnosed in adults by doing a psychosocial and determining if the person had it as a child, if not, we look at what other thing may be going on, as it is not likely that it is Adult ADD. Depression and Anxiety are the two that we often rule/out. [/qoute]

    I remember going through months of counseling along with DD, back-tracking through my childhood...it was exhausting. But worth it! And it helped me understand what she was experiencing.
    I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

    Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.



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