The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default Filly growing upright on Left Front hoof-diet and hoof input please

    My 7 month old filly is starting to contract on her LF.

    It is still mild but certainly going the wrong direction.

    I am reading different thoughts and getting mixed feedback.

    She is currently on nearly dead pasture and a mix of fescue/orchard hay alternated with canadian timothy.

    She gets 2 lbs of JuniorGlo per day (low starch, low NSC, rice bran flax based feed).

    She is slightly ribby but insanely tall. She just had a wicked growth spurt and I think that is what has made it obvious.

    I do not think she is to the point of needing a toe plate but will have the vet out to evaluate.

    I understand pain management is a key component.

    I have read everything from wrapping, hard ground paddock turnout, avoid sand.

    I am even considering pulling her off ALL feed-only low grade hay-then deal with any weight loss after we get past this.

    Anyway just looking for thoughts, feedback, anything to help me gather some more information.

    Farriers and trimmers-what has been your most successful protocol for addressing this?

    I would assume frequent trims to gently lower the heel-but what about the toe? I would guess NOT back it up at all? Rather try to preserve forward toe length?

    Her solar view of the foot is gorgeous-it does not have high heels at all-the heels are low and right at the frog.

    Yet there is a definite upright growth-more significant since about 'an inch ago'-I can't recall what changed back then...she may have had a fever...but I just can't recall.

    thanks...
    Last edited by LMH; Jan. 17, 2010 at 04:26 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,761

    Default

    Get her on rejuvenaide or foal aid daily right away.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Get her on rejuvenaide or foal aid daily right away.
    Can you tell me more? What it does?

    I just googled it and this is the guaranteed analysis:

    GUARANTEED ANALYSIS (per 2 cc dose)

    Copper 19.4mg
    Zinc 55.5mg
    Selenium 1.5mg




    Vitamin A 21,000 IU
    Vitamin D 2,100 IU
    Vitamin E
    600 IU





    Anyway, I was wondering the reasoning behind this if she is already on a good mineral feed?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,806

    Default

    Our filly started to do that ........food wise not much I could do as she was on pasture and hay......no grain.

    What my farrier did was trim her heels down every two weeks for about 2 to 3 months and that did the trick.....by lowering the heel it allows the toe to grow out which in turn will keep the angles correct and allow for the check ligament to be stretched allowing the fetlock to drop......I hope I explained that correctly.

    Dalemma



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default Three cases (anecdotal)

    1. I'm currently trimming a yearling (will be two this spring) who started to get a bit upright on one foot over the summer following a huge growth spurt. Looking at her, it seemed to me that perhaps her bones had lengthened and her soft tissue had not caught up yet--all four feet were a bit steep, but one was a bit higher than the others. The foot that was more upright is the one she puts back for grazing. There was no sign of contraction in the steeper foot and no sign of the flattening in front of the frog that is sometimes seen in club feet.

    The filly was like this when I first saw her, and I consulted a farrier who also breeds warmbloods about how to handle the WB filly's trims. She said frequent trims, keep the heel down. She agreed about the likelihood of it being related to rapid growth.

    Almost six months later, the foot is doing well, and the filly is starting to fill out (wish we'd measured the circumference of her cannon bones for comparison). I think she's catching up with herself. The vet is very happy with her feet, and I think she's not going to develop a club foot after all. Keeping my fingers crossed. After each trim, her HPA looks good, and that is without having to be overly aggressive at the heel. Now her heels are either wearing better or growing slower, since I don't have to remove as much as I used to. Foot is wearing more balanced between trims.

    2. Had a similar, but less dramatic, issue with an Arabian yearling last year as well, and his slightly steeper foot was contracting slightly. His foot got no worse and actually looks better now, though it may end up a bit steeper than his other front. Again, he's starting to fill out, getting more bone, catching up with the length. Moves well. His conformation is not stellar, so his feet have been...interesting...all along. It surprised me when the front foot got steep, because neither parent has one.

    3. The last case is a mustang filly with four club feet. Again, this was most apparent following a growth spurt, and her dorsal walls were almost vertical, hinds worse than fronts. In fact, even with vertical walls, her hind heels floated above the ground. She could also barely bring her hinds forward for me to finish her toes. Filly shifted her weight from hoof to hoof in discomfort before being trimmed.

    She, too, showed great progress through frequent trimming and allowing her time to grow. It was hard to get the owner to reduce the sugar in her feed, since she was underweight. The sad news for this girl is that while her feet are much better, she appears to have an autoimmune disorder and the rest of her is falling apart. I don't know if she'll make it.

    Toes: One problem with feet going clubby is splitting at the toes. The WB filly had some seedy toe, which is now clearing up. I took the toe back as appropriate for the hoof rather than trying to leave it long in an attempt to lengthen the lever. Had I left it long, she'd have destroyed the toe (was on her way to doing so already). Now the toe is much stronger with a good roll, grody stuff is almost gone, fissures are growing out.

    I take pictures before and after every trim to compare with earlier stuff so we can track her progress. Forgot to take pics last month, but it looked better.

    Can't help with diet. All I know is to reduce sugar. Ya'all are more educated about diet and mineral balance than I am.
    "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    matry-my filly sounds like case 1

    So it sounds like frequent lowering of heels is the ticket for her.

    How did you handle trimming the toe area? Just bevel or roll it? Leave it to grow a bit 'long' for 'support?'

    Dalemma-yes your advice made sense and also sounds in line with matry.

    Did you add in anything like ' pain management' during the process?

    Wrapping? Anything or just frequent trims.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    The rolling hills of Virginia
    Posts
    5,892

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    My 7 month old filly is starting to contract on her LF.

    It is still mild but certainly going the wrong direction.

    I am reading different thoughts and getting mixed feedback.

    I am even considering pulling her off ALL feed-only low grade hay-then deal with any weight loss after we get past this.
    No, no and PLEASE NO.

    Please don't stop feeding her. You need to feed her growth spurt, not try to slow it down. She needs high quality protein, calcium and plenty of high quality vitamins and minerals in the correct balance. Fat will not hurt her either if she is a bit ribby and carbs won't kill her either. She is a young growing girl, not an older, founder prone pony! It is best to consult an equine nutritionist. Purina probably has one. I've used Triple Crown's with success. Also, if you have a vet teaching hospital in your state, call and see if they have an equine nutritionist on staff (or a Grad student).

    Your farrier should take of just enough heel so that it still touches the ground on a flat surface. You can check this by ensuring that you can't slid a piece of paper under her heels. You can save a little money by rasping her heels (on that foot) every two weeks between visits. Hopefully your farrier will show you how to do it keep it very flat. If you take off too much and the heels don't touch - THEN you will have pain and cause the pain cycle you are concerned about.

    It is a very delicate balancing act at this stage. You want her to grow more evenly, even when she is shooting up like this. She has gotten a bit out of sync, so you are right to be concerned. But it HAS been proven that trying to slow the growth spurt by withholding feed is more harmful than good. Unfortunately there is still a lot of this old information out there.

    I have been through this several times and have always successfully fed our way out of it (and with the help of a great farrier, who also works well with vets and nutritionists). She should not be fat, but thin in this case is no more helpful and possibley contributing to the problem. Good luck and jingles for your girl.

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Thanks SCFarm-this diet issue is what has my head SPINNING.

    (I trim her-so can handle that given correct input).

    I swear it is 33/33/33 slow feed her, no feed, continue with minerals.


    Her current diet is exactly what was recommended by the head nutritionist at ADM.

    She has a very healthy mineral profile, and calories from a good calorie source through the JuniorGlo.

    She did just EXPLODE behind in the last couple of weeks-like INSANE growth-genetic. Her full sister was crazy tall by 2yo, and daddy breeds very VERY tall fast growing horses predisposed to this very issue.

    It just seems the diet information is SO split and SO mixed.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    How did you handle trimming the toe area? Just bevel or roll it? Leave it to grow a bit 'long' for 'support?'
    Gave it a strong roll. Actually, I had to take the toe back a bit to start healing the fissures, since the wall was prying away at that point.

    There's some controversy about leaving the toes longer on club feet. I'm not a club foot expert, but if the hoof is looking unhealthy, it is also getting weak. You want the toe to be strong, so it needs to be healthy. In this filly's case, I treated the toe like any other weak toe and trimmed to reduce the prying as well as advising treatment of the thrush or whatever was growing in there. It is now a thick, healthy wall that does not wear down as badly. I don't get credit for this, rather, I think the horse's soft tissue caught up with her bones. All I did was keep her feet from forcing limb deviations in the mean time.

    Please note that this filly was not overwearing her sole at the front of her foot, even though she was wearing her walls down to the level of the sole. Wearing of the sole would have had me thinking she needed protection to keep the sole from thinning out. Even so, I'd try taking down the heels frequently before adding anything that is likely to change the way she moves.

    Horses go through so many awkward stages as they grow that all I do is keep the feet out of the way and balance the hoof to the best of my ability each time, letting the horse's growth take care of the rest. Exceptions are in foals born with crooked legs, and I'm not really qualified to deal with anything more than slight limb deviations that are apparent at birth.
    "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    The rolling hills of Virginia
    Posts
    5,892

    Default

    Yep, been exactly where you are right now. And thought my head would explode too. The first time around my vet practice almost ate itself fighting about the more or less grain issue. And finally agreed to abide by the recommendations of the nutritionist at VA Tech. They recommended 7lbs a day of what was then called Legends Mare and Foal for a 7 month old filly! It honestly terrified me, but it worked wonders. And within about 10 weeks she was pretty much resolved. She was also very shiny, happy and looked like a million bucks!

    You might run into this again with her at 14 to 20 months. Same answer as now. Do whatever works/worked for her this time.

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Thanks.

    Seriously-her solar view looks TOTALLY normal.

    Completely even growth/wear from heel to heel.

    She doesn't even grow tall heels!

    It is so odd.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default

    Leah, when I have any doubts about how to trim a horse with issues, I send pics to farriers (and trimmers) I trust. Several. I do this privately to avoid inevitable arguing that happens here.

    My former farrier who now breeds warmbloods has been a tremendous help as well. She's used to the vagaries of growing large horses. And she has done corrective work on foals born with some serious limb deviations. It helps to have such people to consult.

    Thank God there are good people out there willing to share their experiences!!
    "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,806

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    matry-my filly sounds like case 1

    So it sounds like frequent lowering of heels is the ticket for her.

    How did you handle trimming the toe area? Just bevel or roll it? Leave it to grow a bit 'long' for 'support?'

    Dalemma-yes your advice made sense and also sounds in line with matry.

    Did you add in anything like ' pain management' during the process?

    Wrapping? Anything or just frequent trims.
    From what I can recall my filly's toe had no growth so no trimming really needed.......I think you would mostly just balance with the rest of the foot.

    No need for pain meds...as my girl was not lame or in any pain.

    Dalemma



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2005
    Location
    North East, MD
    Posts
    4,356

    Default

    Leah, another thought is to keep an eye on the other front foot. If it starts running forward and getting flat, you'll have a problem. Don't forget to keep the toe and heel back on that foot as well.
    "Passion without knowledge is a runaway horse."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by matryoshka View Post
    Leah, another thought is to keep an eye on the other front foot. If it starts running forward and getting flat, you'll have a problem. Don't forget to keep the toe and heel back on that foot as well.

    Yes, thank you for the reminder.

    I have been watching it. Tomorrow I am going to take photos so I can really look both feet over and have time to study them



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    I'm with Laurie on this one. Foal aid or Rejuvenaide asap.

    http://community.webshots.com/user/ballyduff
    \"If you are going through hell, keep going.\" ~Churchill~



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Quinn View Post
    I'm with Laurie on this one. Foal aid or Rejuvenaide asap.

    http://community.webshots.com/user/ballyduff
    But what is in it that makes it suggested?

    I can't find anything on the website.

    I am open to mineral support but I need a little better understanding of why, if that makes sense.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Definately get the Rejuvenaide and don't stop feeding her!

    Lowering the heel and keeping it at the same height all the time is vital. Should be easy for you Make sure she does not have a problem higher up in the limb. Shoulder issues often present w/an suddenly upright-growing foot. Sometimes a problem in the base of the neck will contribute to this, too.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Thanks EqT...

    But WHY the Rejuvenaide?

    She had a little spill two days ago so I already have the chiro booked.

    Two my knowledge, she has not had a shoulder injury-yes it COULD have happened but not anything showing it (muddy from a fall, tender, etc).

    I will have a base point when the chiro comes.

    NOW if I could just find a really good body worker-for her and others!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2002
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    8,284

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LLDM View Post
    No, no and PLEASE NO.

    Please don't stop feeding her. You need to feed her growth spurt, not try to slow it down. She needs high quality protein, calcium and plenty of high quality vitamins and minerals in the correct balance. Fat will not hurt her either if she is a bit ribby and carbs won't kill her either. She is a young growing girl, not an older, founder prone pony! It is best to consult an equine nutritionist. Purina probably has one. I've used Triple Crown's with success. Also, if you have a vet teaching hospital in your state, call and see if they have an equine nutritionist on staff (or a Grad student).

    Your farrier should take of just enough heel so that it still touches the ground on a flat surface. You can check this by ensuring that you can't slid a piece of paper under her heels. You can save a little money by rasping her heels (on that foot) every two weeks between visits. Hopefully your farrier will show you how to do it keep it very flat. If you take off too much and the heels don't touch - THEN you will have pain and cause the pain cycle you are concerned about.

    It is a very delicate balancing act at this stage. You want her to grow more evenly, even when she is shooting up like this. She has gotten a bit out of sync, so you are right to be concerned. But it HAS been proven that trying to slow the growth spurt by withholding feed is more harmful than good. Unfortunately there is still a lot of this old information out there.

    I have been through this several times and have always successfully fed our way out of it (and with the help of a great farrier, who also works well with vets and nutritionists). She should not be fat, but thin in this case is no more helpful and possibley contributing to the problem. Good luck and jingles for your girl.

    SCFarm
    Ditto, ditto, ditto on all points covered. She needs nutritional support in the form of high quality protein and minerals for proper growth. I use a ration balancer and if a youngster shows any irregularity in growth I increase it rather than cut it. That, along with good farrier work should help your baby tremendously.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 23
    Last Post: Aug. 8, 2011, 05:48 PM
  2. Causes for sole dropping in one front hoof?
    By 4Martini in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Jun. 26, 2010, 12:09 AM
  3. Replies: 21
    Last Post: May. 13, 2010, 08:09 PM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: Jan. 1, 2010, 12:23 AM
  5. Can an abcess pop out the front of the hoof???
    By Keltic Kross in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Dec. 28, 2008, 02:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •