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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2007
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    629

    Default Elevated potassium & calcium levels. Unexplained lamess Issues

    12 Yr old spotted saddle horse. We've had unexplained, off and on lameness issues this past year. To make a very long story short, this summer the horse was not lame, but simply acting "lazy", grunting and groaning on hills but moving on. He is a very forward horse, nothing lazy about him. Took all kinds of lameness exams, blood tests, etc. Found nothing. Vet put him on thyroid meds, he seemed to have 'pepped up' a bit. Maybe. This fall, he progressively got worse until finally a few weeks ago, he stopped working altogether. Started refusing hillls, especially down hills... grunts and groans up hills. On the flat trails, will come to a sudden stop when asked for anything more than a walk.

    This is a very kind, willing, forward, honest, awesome horse. He shows no obvious signs of lameness other than described above.

    Ultrasounded his suspensory ligaments, nothing.
    Vet pulled more blood and the calcium and potassium levels are SLIGHTLY elevated.... Vet is absolutely stumped, but mentioned these levels, and he was going to do more research on the subject. Said it could mean nothing, but may also mean something, relating to this poor horse's obvious pain and discomfort.

    Not a saddle fitting issue. His saddle is custom made to fit him... and just to confirm, I rode him over the past few days in 5 different saddles, a treeless and rode him several times bareback, all with the same results.

    Chiro & accupuncture done too. Feet are fine.

    He is always kinda "chunky" even though he is worked 5 days a week. He gets fed:

    Free choice timothy/orchard grass
    1/2 cup Fat n Fiber pellets
    1/2 cup "Horse Sense" multivitamin
    Fresh Ground Flax Seed
    1 Majesty MSM cookie per day

    Any thoughts???
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,698

    Default

    First 2 thoughts are EPSM and IR
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3

    Default

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    12 Yr old spotted saddle horse.
    ringbone and hock lesions come first to mind...esp in a gaited horse...
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2007
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Wouldn't hock lesions and ringbone show obvious lamenss in the leg with the issue?
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2007
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    How would a vet test for IR or EPSM... blood test?
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    Wouldn't hock lesions and ringbone show obvious lameness in the leg with the issue?
    I have found that vets who are outside of the gaited horse universe sometimes mistake "lame" for "that's how goofy gaited horses move normally"

    also look at the test on your hay and note the potassium levels there...

    best
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2008
    Posts
    346

    Default

    Kim,

    Been there. Same symptoms with my 15 yr old TWH. Treatment on stifle issues -- but real problem is "lower back" diagnosis obtained eventually with a bone scan done at Spurlock's Equine.

    Did your chiro notice any back soreness? In the lumbar/pelvis region?

    elaine



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,087

    Default

    I don't know about the bloodwork, but I had one with similar physical symptoms. She was eventually diagnosed with OCD lesions in both stifles. She appeared sound but began refusing to go forwards, particularly down hills.
    Please don't try to be a voice of reason. It's way more fun to spin things out of control. #BecauseCOTH - showhorsegallery



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2007
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Yes, he was sore in his back, but is not sore now....this is all such a mystery... my poor guy.
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2007
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Hock issues.... he had a lameness exam and trotted off perfectly after stressing hind legs...
    Kim
    The Galloping Grape
    Warrenton, VA
    http://www.GallopingGrape.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
    Location
    Staunton, VA, USA
    Posts
    2,487

    Default I hate to state the obvious but

    Has he been checked for ulcers?

    Did the bloodwork show any elevated enzymes esp the muscle enzymes, CK, or AST any elevated lactate?

    Did the blood work show magnesium levels?

    A muscle biopsy would show it is was EPSM or PSSM.

    When he stops are his hindquarter muscles hard and tight or normal?

    Yours
    MW
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
    Sign up for the Equine nutrition enewsletter on www.foxdenequine.com
    New edition of book is out:
    Horse Nutrition Handbook.

    www.knabstruppers4usa.com



  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    Hock issues.... he had a lameness exam and trotted off perfectly after stressing hind legs...

    trotting a gaited horse for a lameness test ??

    look in the hocks, as the gaited have longer cannons naturally and if he has been made to do things other than gait (the downside of the "they can do anything" tag line ) you can and will wear out their hocks and stifles and pound ring bone into the front..esp cantering about and doing fast stops and starts...
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2002
    Location
    the far side
    Posts
    2,281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    Wouldn't hock lesions and ringbone show obvious lamenss in the leg with the issue?
    Also, if a horse has bilateral issues, they may present as poor performance or general reluctance to go, since favoring one leg puts more stress on the other.
    The plural of anecdote is not data.
    Eventing Yahoo In Training



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,124

    Default

    Do horses get Addison's disease? It is apparently asociated with high Potassium and calcium, and low sodium

    ETA thta extreme lethargy and pain in the hindquarters are among the symptoms in dogs, so maybe the same in horses.

    Currentkly dealing with a possible case in one of our dogs.
    Last edited by Janet; Dec. 22, 2009 at 11:41 PM.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 24, 2009
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I really,really hope it isnt pssm,but if it is,there are diet and excercise changes you can try.I am going through that right now.Ask your vet if it could be POLYSACHARIDE STORAGE.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GallopingGrape View Post
    Wouldn't hock lesions and ringbone show obvious lamenss in the leg with the issue?
    when my horse was diagnosed with high articular ringbone he was took afew shorter steps on the ashfault, he was sound both directions on the lounge and negative to forced flexions. He was intermittently uneven undersaddle and less forward. When my vet looked at his radiographs he said he was in chronic pain, said the IRAP would "lessen his pain".

    Hope your horse is doing better!



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