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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2007
    Posts
    117

    Question What to do with moldy hay?

    We've got a number of bales (probably 25 or so) of hay that got wet and are no longer fit for horses. Any ideas of a good use for it?

    One girl wants to take a bale or two for her goats as she says they can eat it without problem, even moldy hay. Would a shelter that has goats be a likely place that could use some of this stuff?

    As for the rest of it, any ideas? Mulch? Compost? Who would want it? A plant nursery?

    The barn owner is basically planning to spread it in a gully and let it disintegrate. As long as it's spread thinly enough that it doesn't become a nesting ground for rats, that'll work, just hoping to find a better use for it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,354

    Default

    Any hay my horses won't eat I use for covering grass seed in the yard, but not if its too moldy since I am allergic.

    Maybe use a match after it goes in the gully???



  3. #3

    Default

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by Passiton View Post
    We've got a number of bales (probably 25 or so) of hay that got wet and are no longer fit for horses. Any ideas of a good use
    As for the rest of it, any ideas? Mulch? Compost? Who would want it? A plant nursery?

    UOTE]
    we take all nasty hay and put it in big piles...hope for lots of rain and turn about three times a year...

    considering we have 16,000 tons a year and you can expect from 5-20% loss on every load....the piles get pretty big one was more than 30 feet up and 70feet sq at the base...

    after one year or so we fill the spreader trucks and respread on the fields that are thin of organic top matter....


    best
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    We do several things:

    --use as mulch in areas we are re-seeding
    --use for erosion control in areas affected by run-off
    --take to county dump and place in the yard waste area; it gets turned into more mulch

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2007
    Posts
    117

    Default

    The BO isn't planning on reseeding anytime soon and doesn't really want a compost pile -- she mentioned the issue of it being combustible and I suppose she doesn't want to deal with turning it either.

    A match in the gully wouldn't work -- it's in a forested area.

    I'm not sure if the county dump there has a way to mulch yard waste and such, but at least that would give it a way to be reused.

    Any ideas on who might be able to use it besides the BO -- a shelter or plant nursery or someplace else?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2002
    Location
    Cave Creek, AZ
    Posts
    7,896

    Default

    I've heard that cows can eat moldy hay, but a quick search on Google indicates that this might not be the best thing for the cows ;-)

    Good luck!
    Approved helmet: Every time; every ride.
    "When a sport gets to be predictable it ceases to be fun." - RAR's wise brother



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2005
    Posts
    420

    Default

    I had about a dozen moldy bales left last year and I listed them on my local "freecyle" (you can google it to find your local group and how to join - costs nothing, just have to agree to their user rules) - I had so many replies, I could have given away 10 times as much - some gardeners were thrilled to have it and came right away to pick it up. It is a great way to recycle most anything and avoid adding stuff to the landfills.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    Is it true that cows can eat moldy hay with no ill effect? I had someone stop and ask if they could buy any moldy bales I had. I didn't have any, but wondered if it was true that it wouldn't hurt the cows.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2000
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Posts
    2,534

    Default

    I'm no real help because my solution to the same problem was exactly what your BO proposes - throw in a ditch outside the pasture and let nature take its course.
    'Computers are useless. They can only give you answers.'
    - Pablo Picasso



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    4,897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saddleup View Post
    Is it true that cows can eat moldy hay with no ill effect? I had someone stop and ask if they could buy any moldy bales I had. I didn't have any, but wondered if it was true that it wouldn't hurt the cows.
    At my old barn there were both horses and cows. I don't know the first thing about cows, but the BO told us to put any moldy hay in a pile on the cow side of the barn, and his brother fed it to the cows. I have no idea if it is good for them or not, just did what we were told.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,661

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    A contractor might want them, if they're baled. They use them for barriers for run-off and stuff, with that black plastic.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    840

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    We feed moldy hay to the cows, goats, and pigs. It doesn't hurt them.
    To be loved by a horse, or by any animal, should fill us with awe-
    for we have not deserved it.
    Marion Garretty



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    You can put moldy hay out in cow/sheep/goat fields during the spring/summer. They aren't going to eat any nasty bits because they would much prefer to eat the nice green grass. Anyone who has ever feed a round bale and later found out it was terribly moldy inside knows this is also true of horses (although I'd never suggest that for fear of getting my horse-license revolked ).
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,484

    Default

    My neighbor has cows and he is usually happy to get it. Of course, if it's realllllly bad I dont give it to him, I just let it dry and burn it, but the mediumish moldy stuff he will take.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,732

    Default

    Ditto the www.freecycle.org sign-up. You'd be amazed at what people will take!
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Aldie, VA
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post
    Ditto the www.freecycle.org sign-up. You'd be amazed at what people will take!
    Like an "opened can of white Betty Crocker Frosting, ½ used" [paraphrased] was gone the next day. Who'da thunk it?

    FreeCycle is nuts and I do it, too.

    Eileen
    Mad Mare™ Studio
    Custom Swarovski®, Czech glass and gemstone browbands in Circlet, Diadem and Tiara styles. Matching stock pins, bracelets and belts.
    http://MadMare.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 9, 2007
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    My barn manager/owner feeds it to the cows.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post
    Ditto the www.freecycle.org sign-up. You'd be amazed at what people will take!
    Yes! I've gotten rid of moldy hay several times through Freecycle. People want it for mulch, or bedding for goats. I will not let it go to establishments where there are horses, and I make it very clear in my ad that the hay is not suitable for horses.

    I also use some as insulation around the edge of the house every winter.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2005
    Location
    Out West
    Posts
    1,680

    Default

    I stuck an ad in Craigslist (free) for all of the hay scraps in my barn. It was gone in a day - again to someone to feed cows.



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