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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2006
    Location
    Cartersville, GA/Jacksonville, NC
    Posts
    286

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    Get military-style dog tags (punched not engraved like the ones you can get at Wal-Mart kiosks) and braid one into your horses mane, one in the tail, and permanently keep one attached to the cheekpiece of the halter. Plus have a laminated picture of you and your horse to braid into the mane alongside the dogtag or taped to it.
    Devil Pup 13 May 2010
    Veni, vidi, nates calce concidi
    Molly~4yo Blue Heeler & Dakota Nov 09 Baby Heeler



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,424

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    This book might help folks prepare for any type of emergency. It's not specifically horse related - but the section on ensuring you have potable water would be very applicable to livestock.

    Where I live, I'm on a well. And the well water could easily become contaminated in a really bad storm or if there was a chemical spill somewhere.

    Anyway - last time we had a hurricane I did store several hundred gallons of potable water but looking back, I do not think I did it very efficiently, or in a manner that would make it safe to drink for very long.

    This information might apply mostly to rural dwellers who have livestock - but I do recall Richmond Virginia having food shortages and real problems after a hurricane.

    Here it the link - take it for what it's worth. I have not read it.

    http://athagan.members.atlantic.net/...nt_Pantry.html



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2004
    Location
    east of oklahoma city
    Posts
    249

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    Now that the Arabian Horse Foundation has announced the Rescue/Rehoming Advisory Panel, I'm going to bite one very large bullet.

    My first and biggest project as chair will be to work on a national disaster preparedness program, to involve all the breed/discipline organizations as well as rescue organizations. And we're going to need EVERYONE'S HELP!!

    Should have been done long ago, but obviously hasn't been - and if we can support training of emergency personnel, facilitiate the credentials/certifications as first responders, build the network of trained, dedicated horse-owners so that the entire country is involved, the horses will benefit (as will the horse-owners).

    Our initial task will be to expand existing training programs and information systems nation-wide, with the goal of 'teaching a man to fish': trained personnel can carry that training to their local communities, training those people and facilitating the credentialing process. We saw how many willing horse people were stymied, following Katrina and other huge events, because they didn't have the necessary credentials as first responders, and those people who had the credentials were more interested in helping (and better trained to help) smaller companion animals.

    Pockets of people with their own disaster plants can be linked into networks... this will be a grass-roots effort initially, because we all care and have a vested interest in having effective plans in place. If we build the network and can actually be pro-active, we can be effective whether or not national bodies agree to buy in. This thing will have legs... but we all need to work together to coordinate them.
    Arendal Arabians and Sanctuary



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2003
    Posts
    179

    Default

    There is a ton of excellent material in here...

    "What Do I Do With My Horse. In Fire, Flood, and/or Earthquake?”

    http://www.etinational.com/docs/Red%...n%209-2004.pdf



  5. #25
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

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    I am so frustrated with this (have been ever since I moved here)!

    My address is Ocala, but I actually live right behind the high and middle schools of Belleview, FL. And I have been TOTALLY unable to find ANY information on where the heck the disaster shelters are located here! Is that incredible or what?

    I cannot for the life of me believe that this information isn't super easy to find! Here is the complete list of services for the county: http://www.marioncountyfl.org/services_home.htm.

    See any listing for "Emergency Shelters" (for humans) on it? Why in heavens name isn't that the easiest thing to find? If a tornado were headed my way, I'd have no way to find out where the heck to go QUICKLY! (Indeed, as of this writing, I still don't know whether the high school half a mile away is actually a shelter that would be open).

    And here is the page for Pet Shelters: http://www.marioncountyfl.org/Disast...etShelters.htm

    See any indication of where the heck there ARE pet shelters? Check out the last paragraph--it gives the address for some high school in Ocala (remember, I'm in Belleview), but it doesn't actually SAY that is a pet shelter--and is that the ONLY shelter???? And, for me, the biggie: this is the "horse capital of the world"--and yet there's not one word about shelters for horses ANYWHERE!

    Why, why, why is such important information left up to people can't even figure out how to prioritize communication?

    I hope everyone has checked their town or county's website to make sure that information is easy to find--not just online, but in other locations, too (like the phone book--for example, why the heck do phone books have so much drivvel in them: from how to choose your seat at the civic centers to where to find a park, but no maps pointing to the location of emergency shelters???).

    I can figure stuff out on my own, but I really worry about folks who are more dependent (like the elderly and the less educated/experienced). I have complained up the whazoo about this to my town (no replies -- couldn't even get the newspaper to publish a letter to the editor about it!), and I keep complaining. I hope others will check and complain, too--again, not necessarily for yourselves, but for others, too.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

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    Oh, just one more thing: no email addresses! The only email address I could find on that site was for the webmaster--and it included a disclaimer about how some emails don't even get through!

    Ya think they really want to hear from their constituents, huh?
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2008
    Location
    Apple Valley Ca
    Posts
    121

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    I'm very near fire country. The ranch where I am at has never had to evacuate but we have had the option and the BO didnt want to evacuate. I keep a weeks worth of food on hand and a weeks worth of water, the water is changed out every 6 weeks. The food the same.

    I have extremely bright halters that I can easily put on my mare, she also has bright polos that I can use if necessary. I have all scars pictured as well as pictures of her sparkling clean and filthy dirty. I have several fly masks ranging from the supermask to super fine mesh ones that I use for riding when the flies get bad.

    I have access to several trailers as well. I have basically made up an emergency plan for the ranch I am at because the BO doesnt have one, or he has one but he wont tell the boarders what it is. Both my friend and I know how to haul a trailer, the arena has huge sprinklers and the ranch has 4" fire hoses which I know how to use and have used for fun. Theres a hose in every mare motel and one by the stallion and steers.

    If need be I would shave my name, phone number and another phone number (trusted friend) into my horses sides. I have Orange, neon blue, neon green, and neon yellow paint so putting info on horses wont be hard. Both my friend and I have the ability and knowledge to handle all 25 horses on the ranch if we ever had to evacuate. All the horses have BRIGHT neon cotton halters to identify them the cotton halters also have as someone mentioned dog tags with the horses name, age breed, color (if they are dirty) and phone number. the leads are also cotton same color as the halters.
    Dressage it's a way of life!

    It's not as much about long and low as about down and around Courtesy of Gay McCall



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2005
    Location
    Chesapeake, Virginia
    Posts
    2,996

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    Great topic!! And one that every person should research. Everyone has posted some great information and I wanted to touch upon two that have been mentioned.

    JSwan, thanks for the 'plug'! Yes, many state Horse Councils have listings of farms, etc. who are willing to help during a disaster. Try contacting your state horse organizations to see which ones have disaster plans in effect.

    7HL, you also hit upon something I do not think most people know about...SART. Here is a link showing which states already have this in place. http://www.sartusa.org Some of them have their own websites but please look over the site in it's entirety....there is quite a bit of information available. I strongly recommend you contact your state to see how to register and more importantly....help!

    Having said all that....the MOST important thing you can do is to have a plan and be prepared!! If you wait until a hurricane is approaching....it is too late.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,424

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    Quote Originally Posted by pwynnnorman View Post
    Oh, just one more thing: no email addresses! The only email address I could find on that site was for the webmaster--and it included a disclaimer about how some emails don't even get through!

    Ya think they really want to hear from their constituents, huh?

    I know it can be frustrating - VERY frustrating. And I'm sorry to learn that you've had such trouble.

    What I'm suggesting may be in bad taste, so please forgive me if I cause offense. Since there appears to be a bit of a mishmash in your area, could you use your reputation and name and fame as a catalyst? Sometimes what all this mishmash needs is a unifying force. I'm not suggesting that you shoulder this burden yourself. But your name and your pony (may he rest in peace) are not exactly obscure in the horse world. Perhaps there might be a way for you to help streamline things - by offering Teddy's memory as a... not a "cause" , that's too strong a word. Maybe making this "issue" moved up a little in someone's in box.

    Does that make any sense?


    RNB - hey - I was going to email you because I went to the website and could not find any information about the program I signed up for. Am I looking in the wrong place? Since hurricane season is here, I thought there would be a hot link or blurb or banner horse owners could click on.

    Probably stared right at it and missed it. How is that program going, anyway? Will they be working with the State Vet in case of a disaster or will this be administered separately?

    The rural horse/farm owners tend to be a bit more self-sufficient in general, though we'd sure as heck need help just like anyone else. I was wondering about folks in boarding barns closer to urban areas - lots of horses in one place that might need to be moved en masse.

    (the scenario I have in my head is a hurricane coming up the Bay, or a bad one hitting the Norfolk area) The Norfolk area has evacuation routes, I would hope that residents are capable of following them and getting out without killing each other. I wonder if Daydream Believer could comment on that as she's lives down that way. I know my family in NC can get out in minutes (and they've had to)

    If one comes up the Bay - that entire Metro area is completely and totally screwed. They don't have any designated evacuation routes - which is crazy especially after 9/11.


    Can you give us an update on that program and point us to a place where horse owners can get more information? Thanks!!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2006
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    2,345

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walk_N_Gal88 View Post
    Get military-style dog tags (punched not engraved like the ones you can get at Wal-Mart kiosks) and braid one into your horses mane, one in the tail, and permanently keep one attached to the cheekpiece of the halter. Plus have a laminated picture of you and your horse to braid into the mane alongside the dogtag or taped to it.
    When did you get so smart and why have you not told me about this so I could do this for YOUR horse?
    http://community.webshots.com/album/548368465RfewoU[/url]

    She may not have changed the stars from their courses, but she loved a good man, and she rode good horses….author unknown



  11. #31
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

    Default

    J Swan, not my style, really. Just not me at all.

    I did get a response from my query to the local admins.

    However, all the respondant did was list the shelters (for humans). Not one single word about why there's no information on the website. Totally ignored the bulk of my "query."

    Our tax dollars at work.

    Arrogant pricks.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,424

    Default

    Sure thing - no problem.

    Sorry that your area isn't doing what it's supposed to. Localities are supposed to be factoring in animals into their emergency plans. (pets and livestock)

    Guess some localities didn't get the memo. Best of luck to you.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,903

    Default

    There were some very helpful ideas in a thread I started a while ago, if anyone is interested: http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...d.php?t=145271
    "For God hates utterly
    The bray of bragging tongues."
    Sophocles, Antigone Spoken by the Leader of the Chorus of Theban Elders



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2005
    Location
    Strasburg, PA "Just west of Paradise"
    Posts
    3,969

    Default

    Highly recommend this site:

    http://www.tlaer.org/
    Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue

    Some great links and resources. If you can take one of their classes it's a great plus.
    "Have a Coke and a Smile"



  15. #35
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

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    I just don't get why, when it comes to such an important subject, our govenments (in plural, to encompass states and towns, not just the federal government) don't hire professional consultants to make sure they are communicating effectively. I just don't GET that. But I'll stop whining now.

    Actually, I've found discussions here far, far more helpful, like OMom's.

    Indeed, I have a question for folks that hasn't been answered in other discussions.

    My barn is pretty well built--lots of 6x6s and 2x8s, concrete foundation, double walls, etc. The roof I'm not thrilled it as it is an ordinary galvalume one, but everythign else is very solid. In fact, it occurred to me that my barn may be safer in, say, a tornado, than my house, which is a big, modern doublewide with 2x6 sidewalls and hurricane ties--but it's still based on this, well, "crack" down the middle (I envision the thing splitting in two and me getting sucked out cuz, of course, it's alongside the center that all the interior rooms are...).

    But the feed and tack rooms in the barn are not only have only one side exposed to the outside (so they are almost "interior" rooms, being surrounded by the aisle, stalls and hay area and run in), they have their own ceilings (with stuff stored above, under the barn roof) and are double-walled, too.

    So do you think I'd be crazy to just stay in the barn if a tornado approached? The whole place is also surrounded by horse fencing (woven 2x4 squares) that it is said can "catch" dangerous debris. WWYD?
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

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    Ummm, I forgot to mention this is something I'm truly paranoid about. I have a real hangup about natural disasters--my nightmares usually take the form of a natural disaster (or getting stuck in the middle of a bombing raid).
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,424

    Default

    Try living next to a floodplain...

    You'd think this half of the county was the drainage area for the entire state.

    I plan, I watch, I prepare, I have backup plans... and still I worry.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2005
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    5,219

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    We're not as likely to be hit as some areas, but it is good to plan for in advance.

    All horses on my property are microchipped & I'm working on getting the dogs & cats done, too. When fences go down in a storm and you can't catch all of the horses fast enough, this is how authorities can contact us if a horse is found. Or if you have to evacuate your home and a dog runs off, he has some chance of reuniting with you.

    My horses are left out in a storm. I don't want them trapped inside a barn if a tree falls on it or if a tornado tears it apart. I try to check on them as often as possible, even if I'm out there with a raincoat & flashlight.

    A first-aid kit on a hand is a must (people and pets). Also a vet who will call you back 24-7. Even if roads are closed, a vet can walk you though alot and help stabilize the animal.

    I really hate to mention this, but do give some thought to what you'd do if you found a horse suffering badly, critically injured from a storm but roads are closed. Could you call a neighbor to put him down if a vet can't get to you?

    It's also important to plan in advance where you could go with your animals. Do you have friend/family nearby that have a fenced yard or barn? Do your horses tie or stay in portable paddocks, so you could camp out somewhere with them if need be?

    What is the plan for supplying water if your power goes off? How much water can you store? Do you have friend/family near enough where you can refill big water containers? My parents live 5 miles away and are on a different power grid than I am, so when my power is out they ususally have power.

    Do you have a way of getting to help if trees block your road? Do you have a chainsaw to clear your own driveway? A 4x4 truck to get out in a blizzard or flooding? Would you be able to ride to a neighbor's home to get help if you can't get a car out?

    Maybe we can make a list of must-have items, such as first aid kit, multiple flashlights and extra batteries, a well charged cellphone, extra water & jugs, and duct-tape. I have an inverter so I can plug any small item into a vehicle (eg. cell phone charger or laptop) and get AC power. I keep a highway safety kit in my truck including flares.

    Quote Originally Posted by pwynnnorman
    I just don't get why, when it comes to such an important subject, our govenments (in plural, to encompass states and towns, not just the federal government) don't hire professional consultants to make sure they are communicating effectively. I just don't GET that.
    Since a couple of big incidents such as 9-11 and Katrina, they have spent a great deal of time figuring all this out. There is a whole system in place that organizes all the various federal-military-state-local-volunteer systems into a chain of command. I got my training through FEMA as part of my Search-and-Rescue training. FEMA works with state/local levels to make sure everyone is on the same page, communicating, and following orders.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    11,125

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    I have been told that the VA Horse Council and the state Ag agency is in the process of trying to organize and formulate some sort of mass plan for dealing with horses during emergencies such as a hurricane, tornadoes, massive storm systems, and clearance sales at WalMart.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  20. #40
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,424

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    Quote Originally Posted by MayS View Post
    FEMA works with state/local levels to make sure everyone is on the same page, communicating, and following orders.
    Yeah, MayS, with each other, sure. But not with us!

    I wonder how many town/county websites in Florida are like Marion County's: lacking an easy-to-find list of shelters, etc., etc. Wish I were back in school needing something to do a study and write a paper on.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



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