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Tiffani B
Oct. 2, 2010, 07:35 AM
I'm working on a paper for school about the acceptance of Saddlebreds in non-traditional disciplines. Your honest response to the poll question would be most appreciated (I have identical polls in different forums, so please only answer one). Thank you!

Meaning - when you're shopping, if you see a Saddlebred advertised that fits your criteria, would you go look at it, or would you immediately dismiss it solely due to the breed, reputation, bias, your past exposure to Saddlebreds, etc.

I realize there are always "maybes" but I purposely left that response OFF of this poll. Simply yes or no - would you consider a Saddlebred.

CatOnLap
Oct. 2, 2010, 01:58 PM
I've ridden saddlebreds, and the few I've ridden were sensitive but sensible, nice movers with comfortable gaits and were rather narrow bodied so they are easy on old hips and knees ( and backs).

One or two have definitely been in the running when I looked at re-sale projects for all rounders or dressage and if one fell into my lap I wouldn't say no.
That said, around here they are reasonably rare and the price tends to stay high for registered ones.

ReSomething
Oct. 2, 2010, 04:35 PM
I'm biased of course, but I purchase a horse for trail riding based on attitude, sure footedness, comfortable gaits, calmness and intelligence. Any ASB that is represented as meeting those criteria would get a look.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Oct. 2, 2010, 07:51 PM
Absolutely.:yes:

I was privileged to ride an ASB in lessons, and was very impressed with the breed. For huntseat, I mean. I don't see myself ever doing saddleseat.:)

In fact, I was looking for a saddlebred when I met the perfect horse. Who happened to be a QH. But when I get in the market for the next one, I'm thinking saddlebred.:yes:

Painted Horse
Oct. 2, 2010, 11:33 PM
I've had a Arab/Saddlebred cross for 15 years. He is one of the best horses I've ever owned.

I don't know about a full bred saddlebred. But the horse I've owned has been a true pleasure.

JollyBadger
Oct. 3, 2010, 10:01 PM
Yes, absolutely.

I've seen some photos and videos of the heavier-built saddlebreds doing things other than the "typical" saddleseat competition, and was very impressed. That's more along the lines of what I would be interested in.

Lieselotte
Oct. 3, 2010, 10:24 PM
No, not for Endurance. But I would consider a sound ASB with a good mind for trail riding and possibly for LDs.

JackandMo
Oct. 4, 2010, 01:52 PM
The Saddlebred is the ONLY horse I'd consider for trails and endurance.

Of course, I'm totally biased and have one of the MOST amazing ASBs who I do a lot of trail riding on. We've completed a 20 mile trek through sand and pelting rain, and he barely broke a sweat and wanted to CONTINUE.

ASBs (at least the tens of dozens I've been around since the late 70s) have HUGE hearts, SANE minds, QUICK wits, and are so forgiving, giving, compassionate, willing, and eager to work alongside their humans.

When on the trails, the ASB is the only horse I feel safe on, because I know when I'm not thinking, they will do the thinking for me.

jlrcoats
Oct. 4, 2010, 02:12 PM
Have a 2 year old 3/4 arab 1/4 saddlebred, that I can not wait to get on the trail. Her siblings have done wonderful, that is why I got her. Hopefully she will be my next "the one" horse!

rainechyldes
Oct. 4, 2010, 02:50 PM
I have a NSH that will be going into competition next spring - I'll let you know.

Would I consider a purebred - if the horse was physically and metally suitable for the discipline - certainly. I'm less interested in breed then performance ability.

sadlmakr
Oct. 4, 2010, 02:51 PM
I had a friend in my highschool days that had a big Saddlebred gelding that did everything. He could go Western and go on the trails and when she took him into a show he could do Western or English Hunt seat and then go into the Saddleseat class and place in all of his classes. He knew what discipline they were doing by the bit he wore.
At home he was just a horse. But he knew when they were to show off.
He was not nutty and spooky at all. Very sensible and highly intelligent.
It depends on the horse I guess.
As a teen I rode a retired 5 gaited show mare. She knew I was a green kid and took advantage of the fact I was not experienced in riding Saddleseat.
She seemed to love to pull tricks on me.
I learned so much from her though.
I guess it depends on the horse.
But I vote yes.
sadlmakr

Lieselotte
Oct. 4, 2010, 03:19 PM
The Saddlebred is the ONLY horse I'd consider for trails and endurance.

JackandMo,
So you use your ASB for Endurance (50 miles +) and it works for the horse metabolic-wise? What are his/her recoveries like, i.e. how quickly is the horse down to 60bpm at the vet checks? What's you average speed on a 50? What grades do you usually get for gut sounds, hydration, impulsion, etc.?

I know of some Arab/ASB crosses who do well in the LDs and some even in the endurance distances but it's not very common at all so I would love to hear more about your Saddlebred and its breeding background. Thanks!

SteppinEasy
Oct. 4, 2010, 03:28 PM
Lieselotte, did you know that as of last year (the last time I checked), a Saddlebred held the current lifetime mileage record for Endurance? His name is Wing Tempo and it's easy to find out more about his record by googling him. ASBs are perfectly capable Endurance mounts.

Here's a link to his story:
http://www.rightpet.com/ForumDetails/american-saddlebred/270/8

SmartAlex
Oct. 4, 2010, 03:58 PM
JackandMo,
<snip>I know of some Arab/ASB crosses who do well in the LDs and some even in the endurance distances but it's not very common at all so I would love to hear more about your Saddlebred and its breeding background. Thanks!


Lieselotte, did you know that as of last year (the last time I checked), a Saddlebred held the current lifetime mileage record for Endurance? His name is Wing Tempo and it's easy to find out more about his record by googling him. ASBs are perfectly capable Endurance mounts.

Wing Tempo was finally surpassed by Elmer Bandit (Arabian) but Elmer took a little longer to accumulate his lifetime mileage than Wing Tempo did.

Wing Tempo was by Wing Rhythm making him a grandson of Wing Commander. His dam was by a son of Cameo Kirby who was by the grandsire of Wing Commander. Very old solid bloodlines.

Lieselotte
Oct. 4, 2010, 03:58 PM
I don't doubt that there are exceptions to the rule, as is true for everything in life. However, the first endurance horse to pass the 20,000 mile mark was Les Carr's horse, Tulip, a 21-year old Arab/Morgan cross.
http://www.equisearch.com/equiwire_news/tulip_passes_20000_miles_060209/

I also don't doubt that Wing Tempo is a great horse, however, there's no record of him at AERC.org, our governing body. And his owner, Shirley Sobol, has only one 50-mile ride recorded. So I'm not quite sure about the veracity of the article you linked to.

It seemed Tiffani wanted to get an honest idea about use of ASBs in non-traditional disciplines and I simply expressed my opinion which is, again, I would not pick a Saddlebred for Endurance. That doesn't mean they can't succeed at the longer distances but I would love to see some stats for the ones that do.
Dear Fans of Saddlebreds, I am not starting a "breed war" - please settle down ;)

SmartAlex
Oct. 4, 2010, 04:06 PM
I also don't doubt that Wing Tempo is a great horse, however, there's no record of him at AERC.org, our governing body. And his owner, Shirley Sobol, has only one 50-mile ride recorded. So I'm not quite sure about the veracity of the article you linked to.

I don't profess to know who is who or what is what in distance riding, but this is a quote from a Horse.com article (http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12880)
"He won 22 consecutive national championships. The North American Trail Ride Conference awarded him the President's Cup, their highest honor, seven times"

Lieselotte
Oct. 4, 2010, 04:15 PM
Ok, I get it now! Wing Tempo rides "under the flag" of NATRC! That's the discipline of competitive trail, and I believe their longest distance is 25 miles (CT riders, please correct me if I'm wrong.)

Endurance has different rules and the distances are 50 miles (80K), 75 miles (120K) and 100 miles (160K.) Again, not a discipline where you see many pure-bred Saddlebreds succeed, that's why I was so interested in seeing some of the stats for an ASB that does.

Sorry for the confusion!

D_BaldStockings
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:17 AM
Take a look at this:

http://www.saddleandbridle.com/issues/apr09/EnduranceRiding.pdf

The Shahzada is endurance -though not AERC (wrong country) and there was a purchase by a rather prominent endurance person.

The recovery times were what 'sold' the horse.


So there is a strong possibility there.

D_BaldStockings
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:27 AM
found this, too.

1/2 SB so you may discount if you choose

I came across this from Fire Mountain Arabians site:

"Shortly after purchasing Fadwah+/, we were able to acquire two sons, Sierra Fadrazal+/ and Fadwah's Desert Renegade and a short time later a third, Sierra Fad Farrah, who was a Class A trail horse. These three horses were campaigned right along with their sire, Sierra Fadwah+/. Sierra Fadrazal+/, one quarter Quarter Horse, has over 8,000 career miles. He won several multi-day rides, completed the Tevis Cup and Virginia City 100 four years in a row, did over 20 one hundred mile rides and received numerous Best Condition Awards. As their sire continued to pile up the miles, Desert Renegade, a part Saddlebred, carried Jim's 285 lbs. through Tevis in 1985 and in 1987 was sixth at Tevis with Linda Kovisto and 8th at the difficult Bryan Head Race of Champions with Linda Keene where only 16 of some 80 starters completed. Linda Keene and Renegade had been second at the Virginia City 100. Steve Shaw purchased him and besides excelling at endurance he was an excellent Ride and Tie horse, finishing 3rd at the Alturis Levi Ride and Tie. Steve also took him to a second place finish at Tevis. "

Since most horses are not identified as more than 1/2 Arab, there may be more SB out there.

For your consideration.

Oops! Don't mean to change an honest poll.

JackandMo
Oct. 5, 2010, 06:35 AM
JackandMo,
So you use your ASB for Endurance (50 miles +) and it works for the horse metabolic-wise? What are his/her recoveries like, i.e. how quickly is the horse down to 60bpm at the vet checks? What's you average speed on a 50? What grades do you usually get for gut sounds, hydration, impulsion, etc.?

I know of some Arab/ASB crosses who do well in the LDs and some even in the endurance distances but it's not very common at all so I would love to hear more about your Saddlebred and its breeding background. Thanks!

I'm not sure where you read that I used my ASB for 50+ miles. I'm pretty sure I never said, or implied that. I DID say that the ASB is the only horse I would consider for such. I notice you made no mention of my comment about trails - only endurance. Retract the claws, kitty.
Our longest ride is 20 miles (50 miles over the course of two days, the majority of the ride at a walk/trot.)

My horse is still fairly green (he was trained late) and shown only a handful of times. However, I have no doubt that he would excel at endurance, if that is the route we chose to take. And as previously stated, the ONLY horse I would consider for trails AND/OR endurance is the American Saddlebred. I know other breeds do fantastic, but the ASB to ME, based on 30+ years of personal, first hand experience, is the supreme athlete. I trust my Saddlebreds completely do to the job, have fun doing the job, and to do the job safely.

Lieselotte
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:00 PM
Sorry, JackandMo, I thought it was implied that you do BOTH trail riding AND Endurance since you gave the thumbs up for BOTH. However, if you are not an endurance rider yourself, and your horse is not an endurance horse, you may need more information about the physical (and mental) demands on an endurance horse before making up your mind so completely.
I agree with you when you say

I trust my Saddlebreds completely do to the job, have fun doing the job, and to do the job safely.
but the "job" can mean many things.

So, to clarify for the OP: On this thread, at least three different "jobs" could be considered for a Saddlebred, and for the purpose of your survey it might be helpful to separate them: There is trail riding (non-judged, recreational) and there is Endurance, an international discipline with rules and rankings and politics... And inbetween you have competitive trail riding (CTR,) judged but a lot fewer miles than Endurance. Based on what I know about Saddlebreds, I would consider them for trail riding and CTR, always depending on the individual horse of course, but not for Endurance.

JackandMo
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:45 PM
However, if you are not an endurance rider yourself, and your horse is not an endurance horse, you may need more information about the physical (and mental) demands on an endurance horse before making up your mind so completely.



I'm pretty sure I've gathered all the information I need from various sources (real life people, online, etc.) to stand by my original statement that the Saddlebred is the ONLY breed *I* would personally choose as a trail AND/OR endurance mount.

I've not once implied that my ASB, or ANY ASB, would be the "perfect" endurance horse, or win any race entered.
But for reasons I've already mentioned, *I* would choose the ASB to be my partner of choice, and at the VERY least, I would CONSIDER the breed.

The question wasn't "is the ASB the best breed of choice for trail/endurance?"

I absolutely respect that ASBs don't/can't/won't make good mounts in your opinion.
I just don't agree.

katarine
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:57 PM
Tiffani, if I say NO on the Dressage forum, I might say YES on the trail riding forum.

Aren't your various polls all *separate* polls? So really a user answering more than one is ok?

I would absolutely consider one for a trail or CTR horse.

Tiffani B
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:58 PM
This forum is titled Endurance and Trail riding. Consider the discipline you participate in most (or want to), and answer the poll question based on that. Only you know what you're shopping for.

Of course I have a bias towards the breed, but perhaps you should look at the article referenced on the previous page regarding how the breed performs in Endurance.

http://www.saddleandbridle.com/issues/apr09/EnduranceRiding.pdf

I'm also searching for, but cannot locate, the articles written about Sheikh Mohammad purchasing two ASBs for endurance competition.

sadlmakr
Oct. 5, 2010, 01:18 PM
I think it all depends on the individual horse. Some ASB's I have known would never make a trail horse at all. They were show trained and would not do well at anything else.
But there are some that excell at what ever they are asked to do.
Just like some people who do the same.
I can't see painting with a broad brush against any horse of any breed.
It is the individual performance of each one that counts.
JMHO sadlmakr

rainechyldes
Oct. 5, 2010, 01:25 PM
I think it all depends on the individual horse. Some ASB's I have known would never make a trail horse at all. They were show trained and would not do well at anything else.
But there are some that excell at what ever they are asked to do.
Just like some people who do the same.
I can't see painting with a broad brush against any horse of any breed.
It is the individual performance of each one that counts.
JMHO sadlmakr

Exactly. Why I chose yes. I 've ridden endurance for nigh on 20 plus years now, breed is always secondary when choosing a new prospect outside our own breeding program. I've met good/bad endurance horses of every breed- some have what it takes, some don't.

chicamuxen1
Oct. 5, 2010, 01:37 PM
Most people who are searching for a horse capable of being competitive in endurance look for a horse with the right physical and metabolic traits. So in many breeds that aren't known for being used in endurance there may be exceptional individuals that would do really well at it.

Yes, I've owned a marvelous registered ASB in the past and a ASB crossbred. Would I go out looking for an ASB to use specifically as an endurance horse? No, not if I wanted a horse that would be competitive, but then I'm not hooked on that breed. Over all, they haven't been bred to have an optimum body type/movement and metabolism for that sport, not any more, not by the typical breeder. Which is sad, many of our breeds have been changed over the years for the worse.

You'll find people that are hooked on one breed and determined to buy and compete a horse of that breed. Many other folks will have an image in their heads of what that breed is like and will by-pass it. If you want a breed to gain in popularity for other purposes then you have to breed for a good standard, possibly require passing of tests before being papered and get those horses out there.

I think GOOD, well built, well bred ASBs are fantastic horses and very versatile. I think they are a great out cross breed as are TWHs, TBs, Arabs, Morgans and Apps.

Bonnie

rainechyldes
Oct. 5, 2010, 02:13 PM
I think GOOD, well built, well bred ASBs are fantastic horses and very versatile. I think they are a great out cross breed as are TWHs, TBs, Arabs, Morgans and Apps.

Bonnie

I agree, I tend to reallly reallly really..like outcrossing for competitive endurance. Hence why I drive people a bit nutty because I'm not a breed purist when it comes to endurance breeding. I have a lovely little 1/2arab1/2 saddlebred mare that I'l be competing next year for the first time ( she did LDs this season), and I'm super excited about her. I think she'll probably top out as a fast 50 miler, but I'm willing to be pleasantly surprised if she can go farther.

Main reason I'm looking forward to seeing how she does next few years is I'm seriously thinking about adding her to my broodmare band (if she performs well)

katarine
Oct. 5, 2010, 03:58 PM
This forum is titled Endurance and Trail riding. Consider the discipline you participate in most (or want to), and answer the poll question based on that. Only you know what you're shopping for.

Of course I have a bias towards the breed, but perhaps you should look at the article referenced on the previous page regarding how the breed performs in Endurance.

http://www.saddleandbridle.com/issues/apr09/EnduranceRiding.pdf

I'm also searching for, but cannot locate, the articles written about Sheikh Mohammad purchasing two ASBs for endurance competition.

well, disregard one no in the Dressage forum and one Yes here, then. I answered both as I do both :)

sunridge1
Oct. 5, 2010, 07:01 PM
I voted yes (I already own several ASB's) because I do extensive trail riding with my ASB's. Not just one but several different horses. I have a couple here that WOULD be competitive in endurance.

They can go all day without even trying to conserve. However their trot will cover twice the distance as most other horses, perhaps using less energy in the long run.
Another consideration is the large heart mutation. Most of my horses have a least one possible heart line.

My vet strongly urged me to compete. The horse easily could have competed but sadly his owner (me) ain't what she used to be. The vet was very competitive at the time ranking in the top 10 for nearly every with a 3/4 ASB x 1/4 Arab.

D_BaldStockings
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:04 PM
Tiffani,
Here is the link to the original article on the sale
http://www.saddlebred.com/files/endurancearticle.pdf


also I believe this horse is in the AERC hall of fame mid 2000 decade, but might just be an Arabian Endurance award?

"The 50-Mile Half-Arabian Champion, the 8-year-old Half-Saddlebred mare Jamila Khalil, was bred and raised by Kara Disbrow, of Corryton, Tennessee. This was Disbrow's first AHA national ride, and initially she thought, "an extra $75 was a lot for a T-shirt, but after winning the beautiful trophy, Turtle Neck blanket, plaque and ribbon, I wondered how I was going to fit everything in my trailer."

from
http://www.equiworld.net/0104/aha04.htm

suz
Oct. 5, 2010, 09:14 PM
heck yeah, someday i want one for trails, so i can keep up with my buddies on their gaited horses.
i guess my dream saddlebred is a little on the stout side, and closer to the ground. a cross would be fine, as long as i get a really nice gait. someday...

JackandMo
Oct. 6, 2010, 08:26 AM
heck yeah, someday i want one for trails, so i can keep up with my buddies on their gaited horses.
i guess my dream saddlebred is a little on the stout side, and closer to the ground. a cross would be fine, as long as i get a really nice gait. someday...


ASBs aren't gaited, but I digress.

Personally, I am a fan of the more stout ASBs, and they ARE out there. I don't prefer the "newer," petite frames found in a lot of ASBs now. My vision and preference can't get out of the 1970s! My current ASB is thick bodied - good bone, strong legs.
My next ASB will be of similiar build.

Of course, not ALL ASBs would make good trail/endurance horses based on multiple criteria. Training, attitude, health, etc. are all important factors to consider when choosing ANY horse for ANY discipline. Just like not ALL Arabians make good LD mounts, not all ASBs make good 3G show horses.

katarine
Oct. 6, 2010, 04:18 PM
nope, ASB's are not gaited.

suz
Oct. 6, 2010, 09:18 PM
NO!!! i had a horse years ago who was supposed to be a full bred asb. i guess he was not, because he gaited beautifully and was the most comfortable ride--especially that rocking horse canter he had. i never questioned the gait, never knew another asb. i'm kind of astonished! but thanks for setting me straight, now i wonder what he really was!

sadlmakr
Oct. 6, 2010, 09:30 PM
I beg to disagree that Saddlebreds are not gaited. I rode several that were 5 gaited. One who would gait only when I would not let him go as fast as he wanted to.
Not every one of them is gaited but most have it in them if the trainer knows how to ask for it.
Look up the definition of the American Saddlebred and see about the gaiting.
Or perhaps we are not refering to the same thing?
THe Slow Gait and the Rack are not part of the Walk Trot and Canter. Those 2 gaits have been one of the outstanding things about the American Saddlebreds.
sadlmakr

Tiffani B
Oct. 6, 2010, 10:39 PM
This ASB gaiting thing has been covered repeatedly here on COTH.

Saddlebreds must be TAUGHT to gait. They do not do it on their own. You might see a gangly colt ambling around the pasture during an odd growth spurt, but a properly conformed Saddlebred will not do any lateral gaits on their own.

They can be TAUGHT, many quite easily because it's in their genes and obviously we have divisions for five gaited horses (note - unlike a TRUE gaited breeds, the ASB must still possess a true two-beat trot!), but it is a RARE Saddlebred who prefers to gait than trot. The ones who do are usually still growing colts, or if grown, they are butt-high, with long hind cannon bones and upright shoulders, and they are sold off to racking horse competitors and trail riders because they are not valued as show horses or breeding stock.

It's very possible you had a purebred ASB that wouldn't trot, but if you did, there's a reason you had it and it wasn't living in a show home... it's an undesirable trait. (Just like a "trotty" TWH - they exist, but they aren't wanted).

Here's an easy shortcut for everyone.

If it's considered a gaited breed, it DOES NOT TROT. TWH, Rocky Mountain, Spotted Saddlehorse, Pasos, etc... do not trot. Saddlebreds trot. Therefore they are not a gaited breed. Individual horses can be taught to gait, but they still must trot.

Eddy's Mom
Oct. 6, 2010, 10:41 PM
I would definitely not consider an ASB for endurance, but that is just me. I don't think *most* Saddlebreds have the conformation that is ideal for endurance, however, as previously stated- there are exceptions to every rule.

I understand people who appreciate and love the fact their horses can do 20 miles without effort, but over the long haul, I don't think *most* are built to last through the miles.

sdlbredfan
Oct. 6, 2010, 10:48 PM
Sadly, many Saddlebreds are on the roads today pulling buggies 40 - 60 miles a day. If that does not indicate their innate ability to work that hard, I do not know what else would, other than considering their history. The stalliion forebears of today's Saddlebreds often were war horses (the Civil War) and often had to cover long distances daily.

katarine
Oct. 6, 2010, 11:00 PM
This ASB gaiting thing has been covered repeatedly here on COTH.

Saddlebreds must be TAUGHT to gait. They do not do it on their own. You might see a gangly colt ambling around the pasture during an odd growth spurt, but a properly conformed Saddlebred will not do any lateral gaits on their own.

They can be TAUGHT, many quite easily because it's in their genes and obviously we have divisions for five gaited horses (note - unlike a TRUE gaited breeds, the ASB must still possess a true two-beat trot!), but it is a RARE Saddlebred who prefers to gait than trot. The ones who do are usually still growing colts, or if grown, they are butt-high, with long hind cannon bones and upright shoulders, and they are sold off to racking horse competitors and trail riders because they are not valued as show horses or breeding stock.

It's very possible you had a purebred ASB that wouldn't trot, but if you did, there's a reason you had it and it wasn't living in a show home... it's an undesirable trait. (Just like a "trotty" TWH - they exist, but they aren't wanted).

Here's an easy shortcut for everyone.

If it's considered a gaited breed, it DOES NOT TROT. TWH, Rocky Mountain, Spotted Saddlehorse, Pasos, etc... do not trot. Saddlebreds trot. Therefore they are not a gaited breed. Individual horses can be taught to gait, but they still must trot.


someone posted the neatest link some time back, to a trainer's videos of starting a young horse on the way to learning a rack, w/o messing up their trot, do you recall what I'm talking about?

ASBJumper
Oct. 7, 2010, 12:15 AM
Ditto what Tiffani said - Saddlebreds are not *naturally* gaited - "naturally" being the key word, here. ;)

Their ancestry and type makes it easy for them to be TAUGHT the slow gait and the rack, but 99% of them will not do it on their own in the pasture.

None of the 3 ASBs i've owned were/are gaited, heck they don't even have much knee and hock action - just long, lovely forward gaits.

Tiffani B
Oct. 7, 2010, 12:38 AM
someone posted the neatest link some time back, to a trainer's videos of starting a young horse on the way to learning a rack, w/o messing up their trot, do you recall what I'm talking about?

The only video I'm aware of is sold by the ASB Museum, by Doc Raun and Liz Kinney.

And I love your sig... how far away is far enough? LOL

JackandMo
Oct. 7, 2010, 07:42 AM
Sadly, many Saddlebreds are on the roads today pulling buggies 40 - 60 miles a day. If that does not indicate their innate ability to work that hard, I do not know what else would, other than considering their history. The stalliion forebears of today's Saddlebreds often were war horses (the Civil War) and often had to cover long distances daily.


Bingo!!!

SmartAlex
Oct. 7, 2010, 09:58 AM
someone posted the neatest link some time back, to a trainer's videos of starting a young horse on the way to learning a rack, w/o messing up their trot, do you recall what I'm talking about?

Second one down:

http://www.sunsetfarmsaddlebreds.com/trainer%20tips.htm

and, a detailed explanation:

http://trot.org/2008/12/31/getting-the-first-steps-how-a-young-saddlebred-is-taught-to-rack/

katarine
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:04 AM
That's it, SmartAlex: thanks> I will bookmark that, i think it's a good reference for ASBs

katarine
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:07 AM
The only video I'm aware of is sold by the ASB Museum, by Doc Raun and Liz Kinney.

And I love your sig... how far away is far enough? LOL

LOL I'm paraphrasing the sunvisored wondermouth, Linda. In the video I saw most recently, she's harassed some poor Ayrab into staying waaay out at the end of her 12' lead rope, far enough out that if he takes sufficient offense or his birdie leaves the county, he need only go Kapow with that left hind and effectively cave her yapping fool head in...and yet what she says is SEE HOW SAFE I AM? WITH HIM SO FAR AWAY???

jeepers. Who knew we needed 12' of slack between ourselves and a broke horse on a lead line? Really. Who knew.

rainechyldes
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:52 AM
LOL I'm paraphrasing the sunvisored wondermouth, Linda. In the video I saw most recently, she's harassed some poor Ayrab into staying waaay out at the end of her 12' lead rope, far enough out that if he takes sufficient offense or his birdie leaves the county, he need only go Kapow with that left hind and effectively cave her yapping fool head in...and yet what she says is SEE HOW SAFE I AM? WITH HIM SO FAR AWAY???

jeepers. Who knew we needed 12' of slack between ourselves and a broke horse on a lead line? Really. Who knew.

heh, I saw that video - it was about the best example of how NOT to teach a horse to lead I've ever seen - she is just marketing it wrong! *snorts*