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View Full Version : Pulling with a Chevy Tahoe? Good or bad?



tx3dayeventer
Jan. 20, 2009, 10:26 AM
I will NOT be using it to go further than one or two hours (I have a 4H gooseneck for that).

I am looking at buying a 2 horse WW bumper-pull. Nothing fancy. Just a 2H side by side without a tack room (just the little tack compartment under the manger). Looks similar to this: http://www.wwtrailer.com/gal_images/silver_duster.jpg

I will only use it to run one horse (16H QH, who is built like a TB) to vet (which is 45 minutes) and just around town.

I have a 03 Tahoe 4x4 V8 with a towing package. The Chevy dealership said I can haul 8,200 lbs with it.

What do ya'll think? Would this combination be safe for driving around town and to the vet?

I just want to restate that I have a 4H gooseneck for long hauls so this would just be for short hauls (less than 2 hrs).

atlatl
Jan. 20, 2009, 10:31 AM
I pull a 2 horse straight load aluminum warmblood sized Sundowner with a dressing room with an 04 Tahoe with a tow package and have had absolutely no problem. The issue with tow vehicles is stopping the trailer more than pulling it. I can't remember where I got the information on the recommended wheel base length of the tow vehicle, but the Tahoe was fine.

My previous tow vehicle was a 1990 Chevy 1500 with tow package. I would not hesitate to tow long distances with the Tahoe.

tidy rabbit
Jan. 20, 2009, 10:38 AM
I had a Tahoe & a bumper pull 2 horse. I don't think I would have wanted to take it through the Sierras or cross country, but it was fine for my 200+ mile range. I did end up having Trany troubles though.

flshgordon
Jan. 20, 2009, 10:38 AM
I have (sounds like) the exact same vehicle and tow my 3h slant Trails West with it no problem. Usually only with 2 horses but occasionally (in emergency hurricane evac!) have hauled 3. Most I have driven with it is about 1.5-2 hours away. My trailer is pretty lightweight though-aluminum over steel frame. I can't remember the weight at this point but it was considerably less than even many 2h steel trailers.

lovemyoldguy
Jan. 20, 2009, 11:01 AM
I have a 98 GMC Yukon (same thing as a Tahoe) with a tow package that I used to pull my Shoop 2-horse bumper pull. The trailer alone was 3000-ish lbs, and I hauled both my big-butt (1400lbs) gelding and my sister's QH (1100 lbs). I never had any problems and felt very comfortable with the power of the Yukon, even hauling 5000+lbs.

One thing that made a big difference was the anti-sway bars - I'm sure most (a lot?) of people here use them, but I was always shocked at how many little rigs (e.g., SUV and trailer) I used to see that did NOT.

Calhoun
Jan. 20, 2009, 01:30 PM
Although, I lived in an area which was flat, I used a Tahoe to pull my 2H bumper pull (no DR) Featherlite w/o problems for 3 years. It was not unusual for me to haul 3-4 hours to a show and I hauled just my horse.

CANTEREOIN
Jan. 20, 2009, 02:46 PM
I tow all over the Northeast with my 2006 Tahoe (with towing package). I had my 16.3H Dutch Warmblood, a 16.1H hannoverian plus shavings, hay, grain, showing equipment for two eventers going to an Event 3.5 hours away for a three day horse trial. No problems what so ever... hills and all.

I was told by a very reputable Horse Trailer dealer that it (and the Yukon) were the only SUV's he would recommend as safe towing vehicles. You're in good hands.

tx3dayeventer
Jan. 20, 2009, 03:02 PM
Thanks so much! I am going to go look at the trailer this weekend and hope to bring it home with me. I feel better knowing there are many people that tow with a Tahoe.

Where I live EVERYONE hauls EVERYTHING (even those scary little 1 horse trailers with one axle) with a dually.

AKB
Jan. 20, 2009, 04:01 PM
I have pulled my 2 horse Sundowner (no dressing room) and two plump Irish Draughts, down interstate route 81 in Virginia. Some of the hill/mountains are quite steep. I have had no problems with my Tahoe pulling the trailer. I admit that on an interstate, I feel the trailer is more stable at high speeds (60-65mph) if I tow using my daughter's pickup truck. However, at normal speeds, the Tahoe is great.

nightsong
Jan. 20, 2009, 07:33 PM
Most accidents occur within 20 miles of home. The type of driving you are suggesting doing with your admittedly less-safe vehicle has more stops, starts, turns and encounters with @$$#0\= drivers than long-hauls do.

lstevenson
Jan. 20, 2009, 07:41 PM
The shorter wheelbase does make it more unstable with a trailer, and therefore slightly more dangerous. You will feel the difference when towing at high speeds, when it's very windy, and when the 18 wheelers pass you! Sway bars do help a lot though.

BeastieSlave
Jan. 20, 2009, 07:49 PM
I'm a total Tahoe lover :yes: I'm on my second one. Both have/had the big Vortec V-8 with towing package, etc.

The first one was great (the new one is too, but I haven't had it as long). It was a 2000 and when it finally wore out it had over 274,000 miles on it - and a lot of those were towing. My longest haul was 11 hours each way, but mostly I haul locally (within 45 minutes) or up to 6 hours (ea. way) away for shows.

I'm in south GA and it's pretty flat, so I don't really sweat the few inches difference in wheelbase. Maybe that's foolish, but the Tahoes have done very well pulling my 2H BP!

Pat
Jan. 20, 2009, 08:01 PM
I *think* I've used a Tahoe to tow before. Er, it wasn't my rig, it belonged to the wacky chick I was working for. We only toodled around to nearby shows and the odd hunter pace. Mostly back roads and rural divided hiways w/55 mph speed limits.

The trailer was a nice little 2H with a small but funtional tack room. Other than the hitch the dealer guy sold her, it was all pretty good. That hitch had a hieght adjustment on it and I had to remove it for her when we weren't towing anything or she'd bottom out on every driveway!! lol

Sway bars, tho. don't leave home with out the sway bars. With a larger towing vehicle it's not a big deal, but with what you are suggesting they really aren't an option.

But, if you have a truck for that gooseneck, why use the Tahoe?

Pat
Jan. 20, 2009, 08:04 PM
... down interstate route 81 in Virginia. Some of the hill/mountains are quite steep...


weeeeee!!! I've done that run more than once, straight on from Harrisburg, PA to the TN boarder. Those hills on I-81 are pretty impressive!!

Chardavej
Jan. 20, 2009, 08:07 PM
My concern wouldn't be with pulling, as I am sure it pulls fine, I would be concerned about stopping, being able to stop quick, short and straight....

Susan P
Jan. 20, 2009, 08:47 PM
I had no problem hauling with my Tahoe until it had some problems as it got older. It should have enough power and weight to haul a 2 horse bumper pull. My husband repairs tractor trailers and a lot of horse equipment and he picked out the car. He understand those things better than I do. I never even felt the trailer as I towed it until as I say, it got older and worn. Actually the trailer had better breaks than the Tahoe, which has lousy brakes.

I do have a F-250 now but no trailer, need to remedy that. My trailer has aged too.




I will NOT be using it to go further than one or two hours (I have a 4H gooseneck for that).

I am looking at buying a 2 horse WW bumper-pull. Nothing fancy. Just a 2H side by side without a tack room (just the little tack compartment under the manger). Looks similar to this: http://www.wwtrailer.com/gal_images/silver_duster.jpg

I will only use it to run one horse (16H QH, who is built like a TB) to vet (which is 45 minutes) and just around town.

I have a 03 Tahoe 4x4 V8 with a towing package. The Chevy dealership said I can haul 8,200 lbs with it.

What do ya'll think? Would this combination be safe for driving around town and to the vet?

I just want to restate that I have a 4H gooseneck for long hauls so this would just be for short hauls (less than 2 hrs).

tx3dayeventer
Jan. 20, 2009, 09:33 PM
But, if you have a truck for that gooseneck, why use the Tahoe?

B/c the truck is used by the SO daily. I have to switch vehicles with him and then go hook up my gooseneck (or I guess in this case the 2H BP). PITA (the switching of vehicles)!

ThisTooShallPass
Jan. 21, 2009, 12:37 AM
This has been discussed to death over the years on COTH.

Stopping. Stopping is the issue. Stopping! Stopping! Stopping!

Some folks simply like to try to cheat death. Death always wins. Sometimes sooner due to stupidity.

lstevenson
Jan. 21, 2009, 12:46 AM
This has been discussed to death over the years on COTH.

Stopping. Stopping is the issue. Stopping! Stopping! Stopping!

Some folks simply like to try to cheat death. Death always wins. Sometimes sooner due to stupidity.



Um... trailers have brakes. And Tahoe weighs as much or more than your average pick up truck. So it's perfectly capable of stopping a two horse trailer. Yes, the heavier the tow vehicle, the better. But the Tahoe is heavy enough to safely stop a trailer. I maintain that the shorter wheelbase is the real drawback (think sway and possible jacknife).

ThisTooShallPass
Jan. 21, 2009, 12:49 AM
Idiots pull with average pick up trucks.

Yes, I absolutely did just say that.

2bee
Jan. 21, 2009, 06:59 AM
This has been discussed to death over the years on COTH.

Stopping. Stopping is the issue. Stopping! Stopping! Stopping!

Some folks simply like to try to cheat death. Death always wins. Sometimes sooner due to stupidity.




Idiots pull with average pick up trucks.

Yes, I absolutely did just say that.

In the recent COTH survey, 42% of those polled DID NOT have a horse trailer. Anybody want to guess which box this drama queen checked?

Chardavej
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:05 AM
Um... trailers have brakes. And Tahoe weighs as much or more than your average pick up truck. So it's perfectly capable of stopping a two horse trailer. Yes, the heavier the tow vehicle, the better. But the Tahoe is heavy enough to safely stop a trailer. I maintain that the shorter wheelbase is the real drawback (think sway and possible jacknife).

Umm, yes, they do. But they are to ASSIST the truck, the trailer should never have stronger brakes, the Tahoe doesn't have large calipers and with the shorter wheel base when you stop quick can whip and jackknife.

You all can say the Tahoe pulls great, heck I bet my Minivan could too, but it wont stop as good as a vehicle that is recommended for the heavy load of a loaded horse trailer.

All it would take is one hard, fast stop and it's over.

But you can say it pulled it just fine before you had to stop.

WHY WHY WHY take the chance??

2bee
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:36 AM
Umm, yes, they do. But they are to ASSIST the truck, the trailer should never have stronger brakes, the Tahoe doesn't have large calipers and with the shorter wheel base when you stop quick can whip and jackknife.

You all can say the Tahoe pulls great, heck I bet my Minivan could too, but it wont stop as good as a vehicle that is recommended for the heavy load of a loaded horse trailer.

All it would take is one hard, fast stop and it's over.

But you can say it pulled it just fine before you had to stop.

WHY WHY WHY take the chance??

I guess you were in the 42% also? My Explorer would stop HARD, SHORT, and STRAIGHT hauling almost 6,000# of horse/trailer. I would bet money it stopped as well or better than the Chevy 3500 I haul with now.

Trailer brakes do not "assist" the truck, the trailer brakes stop the trailer.

armandh
Jan. 21, 2009, 07:55 AM
the wife's yukon has the trailer package
I have used it to tow a light 2 horse.
I preferred it to the expedition I spent 5 years towing with.
neither were as good as the '87 and '92 2500 suburbans
nor as good as the '02 2500 pickup I have now.

best of the lot was the '92 454 4X4
if you over look the prodigious thirst

lstevenson
Jan. 21, 2009, 01:32 PM
Umm, yes, they do. But they are to ASSIST the truck, the trailer should never have stronger brakes, the Tahoe doesn't have large calipers and with the shorter wheel base when you stop quick can whip and jackknife.

You all can say the Tahoe pulls great, heck I bet my Minivan could too, but it wont stop as good as a vehicle that is recommended for the heavy load of a loaded horse trailer.

All it would take is one hard, fast stop and it's over.

But you can say it pulled it just fine before you had to stop.

WHY WHY WHY take the chance??


Unlike the Minivan, the Tahoe IS recommended for towing by the manufacturer.

And the trailer's brakes are not stronger than the Tahoes. We are talking about a large vehicle here, not a Camry.

I have always used Suburbans for hauling, and my last horse trailer had chronic problems with it's brakes. Even when my trailer brakes were not working AT ALL, my Suburban could stop the loaded trailer quickly and safely. No, the Tahoe is not as big or heavy as the Suburban, but the difference is not huge. And with working trailer brakes, the Tahoe would have no problem stopping the trailer.

Romany
Jan. 21, 2009, 03:22 PM
Wasn't there an old discussion here on COTH about trailering safety, and someone (I seem to remember a pilot?) suggested taking your chosen truck n trailer to a big empty parking lot, measuring and marking stopping distances, etc, with cones, and then doing some practice driving. I can't find the link - sorry.

Not the real thing, but a good start.

And I agree with the others - it's not whether the vehicle can tow the trailer (an ATV can tow a trailer), it's whether it can stop and control a trailer with a couple of horses shifting their weight in it.

tx3dayeventer
Jan. 21, 2009, 03:40 PM
Wasn't there an old discussion here on COTH about trailering safety, and someone (I seem to remember a pilot?) suggested taking your chosen truck n trailer to a big empty parking lot, measuring and marking stopping distances, etc, with cones, and then doing some practice driving. I can't find the link - sorry.


If anyone can find that link I would be interested.



And I agree with the others - it's not whether the vehicle can tow the trailer (an ATV can tow a trailer), it's whether it can stop and control a trailer with a couple of horses shifting their weight in it.

I am only asking about hauling 1 horse about 45 minutes up the road (that has a speed limit of 55mph) that relatively no 18-wheelers drive on (its a Farm-to-market road) :D

ETA: said road with 55 mph speed limit is ONLY 2 lane (one going each way) with the occasional passing lane. I do not care if I am going 55 and have a line of cars behind me, I gladly pull over to the "slow" lane when the passing area comes up. I pull my big trailer like this as well. There is not an Interstate within about an hour (or hour and a half) from where I live in any given direction, aren't I lucky? :D

Susan P
Jan. 21, 2009, 04:05 PM
Ok, before you keep calling people idiots, you should know that my husband is in the business of working on bigger equipment and equipment owned by the top equestrians in the world, yes, world, not just country. He's well educated on all facets of tow vehicles, not just a 2 horse bumper pull. If you think you know more than someone with over 30 years of book knowledge and practical experience who owns the premier truck repair shop in the county then go ahead and make a fool of yourself. He chose my Tahoe as a tow vehicle, he doesn't have a problem with a F-150 towing the 2 horse, but it's really the driver that makes the difference. If you are not capable of handling the equipment, please stay off the road no matter how big your tow vehicle is. I never used an anti sway bar, never had a need, never had a problem. I drove my Tahoe, with a tow package, the only problem was when I was not hooked up, the brakes were awful. The trailer did a better job stopping the Tahoe than the Tahoe would stop on it's own.

My husband is considered an expert in his field. Just explaining the credential behind my statement. If he says a vehicle is safe to tow with it's not just me that will believe him, it's the PA state police, and hundreds of our customers over the years hauling a lot bigger equipment with many more horses and the finest of horses and equipment. I'm not going to mention names to strangers here, but if you've seen the horse on TV in competition and they are local to us, then there's a fair chance they are our customers.

tangledweb
Jan. 21, 2009, 04:20 PM
Idiots pull with average pick up trucks.

Yes, I absolutely did just say that.

So 2/3 of the people at every horse show are idiots?

Lucky we have you here to enlighten us, with your calm, well reasoned advice, backed up with reference to reliable information and not containing any undue emotion, or resorting to name calling.

ThisTooShallPass
Jan. 21, 2009, 05:09 PM
I stand by my statements.

CANTEREOIN
Jan. 21, 2009, 05:15 PM
Umm, yes, they do. But they are to ASSIST the truck, the trailer should never have stronger brakes, the Tahoe doesn't have large calipers and with the shorter wheel base when you stop quick can whip and jackknife.

You all can say the Tahoe pulls great, heck I bet my Minivan could too, but it wont stop as good as a vehicle that is recommended for the heavy load of a loaded horse trailer.

All it would take is one hard, fast stop and it's over.

But you can say it pulled it just fine before you had to stop.

WHY WHY WHY take the chance??

My HORSE Trailer dealer... again HORSE Trailer dealer, well respected in New England... highly recommended the Tahoe as the only SUV with the capacity to pull a two horse trailer with a dressing room safely. He knew my horse, sold me the trailer after he recommended the purchase of a Tahoe.

He also recommends weight distribution bars be used for bumper pulls.

I use the COTH forum for ideas but I finalize my decisions with qualified professionals.

asterix
Jan. 21, 2009, 05:20 PM
I hate to stick my toe in here, but can I just ask, for folks who have a set-up which does not feel as stable as possible at 60 mph (whatever that set up might be, not getting into that discussion); do you really feel that this is a safe option for hauling on interstates? I've never been on an interstate where you could consistently go 55 or less and really feel safe.

I had to go 55 not long ago while hauling in potentially slippery conditions; the amount I got drivers roaring up behind me, narrowly swerving around, etc., was hair-raising.

Obviously there is a point at which your rig will start to feel overwhelmed, speed-wise, and obviously you should not drive your rig as though you were driving your car, but it just seems to me that 60 mph is not the speed at which I'd want to HAVE to slow down -- everyone else is typically going 65-70.

enjoytheride
Jan. 21, 2009, 05:25 PM
A brender up would also be an excellent trailer choice. They are built lighter and have a low tongue weight compared to the American style trailers.

tx3dayeventer
Jan. 21, 2009, 05:53 PM
A brender up would also be an excellent trailer choice. They are built lighter and have a low tongue weight compared to the American style trailers.

Looked at one of these but WOW they are expensive! $10,000 for a trailer to just haul one horse to just the vet or a lesson, really isn't doable.

I do really like them and set out to get one until I saw their price (even the used ones).

BeastieSlave
Jan. 21, 2009, 08:04 PM
I had my 'ho and trailer on the expressway today with one 1,200+ lb. horse. 140 mile round trip - about half of it on the expressway with 60-65mph speed limits (construction along parts). It was a snap, and as usual, I hardly felt the trailer behind me.

I feel safe on the interstates in GA, AL, and FL for sure, and I have hauled horses up, down, and around I-10, I-75, I-85, I-95, I-285, etc. I also felt comfortable in the Carolinas, TN and KY, but I don't tow much there, so I can't claim that would always be the case...

exploding pony
Jan. 21, 2009, 08:24 PM
I haul a 2H BP with a Tahoe and it does well. A few things - I always use a weight distribution hitch (I don't NEED it, but I like to be extra careful) and sway bars (back to being extra careful).

I don't like hauling two horses with it. I haul my mare a couple of times a month, by herself, no issues. She's about 15H.

It's well below the towing capacity as I have it set up - I think it is rated at 7500 lbs, I haul probably 4500 with my horse, gear and trailer. I'm a very careful driver. I don't like Brenderups; I have an aluminum trailer with a dressing room.

It's not a 3/4 ton truck, but I am very comfortable with my rig having done quite a bit of research. The engine, wheel base and brakes are all rated well above what I am doing, so I'm comfortable.

Do I wish I had a 3/4 ton truck dedicated to hauling? Sure. But I don't have the money, so this is the best compromise that I can find based on the research that I have done.

Chardavej
Jan. 21, 2009, 09:13 PM
I guess you were in the 42% also? My Explorer would stop HARD, SHORT, and STRAIGHT hauling almost 6,000# of horse/trailer. I would bet money it stopped as well or better than the Chevy 3500 I haul with now.

Trailer brakes do not "assist" the truck, the trailer brakes stop the trailer.



No, not in 42% as I didn't participate in any poll.

Trailer brakes assist in stopping.

Pull with a Tahoe, I have my opinion of the safety of it and you have yours. We agree to disagree.

2bee
Jan. 22, 2009, 07:49 AM
No, not in 42% as I didn't participate in any poll.

Trailer brakes assist in stopping.

Pull with a Tahoe, I have my opinion of the safety of it and you have yours. We agree to disagree.


Just trying to help you understand. And since you dont understand the trailer brakes stop the trailer, I can see how/why you arrived at your "opinion of safety".....too bad it (your opinion) is not based on any facts.

Do a little investigation on brake sizes and how brake controllers work, then check back with us.

Susan P
Jan. 22, 2009, 09:40 AM
This is why I stated, that the rig is suitable but depends on the skill of the driver. Some people should not be on the road. You should always take precautions when you drive any trailer, there is an added risk. You must THINK about what is following you. If you go too fast you surely can lose it like many truck driver lose control of their rigs. In the past year we've heard about a few trucks hauling horses to slaughter that wrecked because they were overloaded and speeding for the road conditions.




I hate to stick my toe in here, but can I just ask, for folks who have a set-up which does not feel as stable as possible at 60 mph (whatever that set up might be, not getting into that discussion); do you really feel that this is a safe option for hauling on interstates? I've never been on an interstate where you could consistently go 55 or less and really feel safe.

I had to go 55 not long ago while hauling in potentially slippery conditions; the amount I got drivers roaring up behind me, narrowly swerving around, etc., was hair-raising.

Obviously there is a point at which your rig will start to feel overwhelmed, speed-wise, and obviously you should not drive your rig as though you were driving your car, but it just seems to me that 60 mph is not the speed at which I'd want to HAVE to slow down -- everyone else is typically going 65-70.

Susan P
Jan. 22, 2009, 09:47 AM
When it comes to trailer safety our opinions don't mean beans, only the facts matter, driving skill and good judgement. Who cares what any of us believe, the facts are all that matter. Educate yourself if you have concerns, my husband has done that so I take his word for it. I've also done a little reading myself years ago in Practical Horseman on towing capacity.

tx3dayeventer
Jan. 22, 2009, 10:16 AM
When it comes to trailer safety our opinions don't mean beans, only the facts matter, driving skill and good judgement. Who cares what any of us believe, the facts are all that matter. Educate yourself if you have concerns, my husband has done that so I take his word for it. I've also done a little reading myself years ago in Practical Horseman on towing capacity.

Thank you Susan. I have done a tad bit of research on it but it has been 20 years since we have owned/pulled a bumper pull (and I was only 6 then:D), we are a strictly gooseneck family. I know that the Tahoe can pull the trailer but my concern was the shorter wheel base. I asked the trailer dealership up here and they were too busy trying to sell me a 4H with LQ (despite the fact I told them I already had one) so they were no help and the ONLY chevy dealer in the area told me that the Tahoe could pull 8,200 lbs and he "thought" I would be fine.

That is why I came here. Ya'll are a virtual cornucopia of information and experience.

I have been hauling trailers for 10 almost 11 years and spent 4 years on the road by myself hauling all over the country (even to Canada) to events (literally, I put over 250,000+ miles on my trucks). I feel confident in my hauling abilities.

I just needed some reassurance that I did not get from the people here in my area (kinda country, more used to duallys and huge rigs). They did not know much about hauling with a Tahoe b/c most of their customers take out 2nd mortgages to buy Mini Peterbuilts and HUGE LQ trailers, or atleast thats what they told me.

I appreciate the info and am going to go look at one this weekend. I am going to hook it up and haul it around. Maybe the guy will let me stick his roping mare it just to see how it hauls.

subk
Jan. 22, 2009, 11:11 AM
B/c the truck is used by the SO daily. I have to switch vehicles with him and then go hook up my gooseneck (or I guess in this case the 2H BP). PITA (the switching of vehicles)!
This would be the exact reason I hauled with a Tahoe as well. Nothing like wanting to go on a trail ride with pals only to have the truck parked at the airport! I never had a problem with it or felt my Tahoe was undersized, underpowered or had the handling compromised. Sure I'd would have rather pulled with the 3/4 ton truck, but just because an elephant gun can do the job doesn't mean that a little less firepower isn't just as effective.

StefffiC
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:27 PM
Just trying to help you understand. And since you dont understand the trailer brakes stop the trailer, I can see how/why you arrived at your "opinion of safety".....too bad it (your opinion) is not based on any facts.

Do a little investigation on brake sizes and how brake controllers work, then check back with us.

What happens when your trailer comes unplugged and you have *no* trailer brakes? BTDT, I was a passenger coming off a mountain. My horse was in another trailer (thankfully!), and we all survived the incident, but I'd rather be overtrucked and overbraked as undertrucked and relying on trailer brakes that may and may not work.

Steph

Susan P
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:31 PM
If you come unplugged your trailer should be set up to lock up. There is a safety that is connected to your vehicle, it becomes detached and that's a sensor to your trailer brakes. Your trailer brakes act independent of your truck at that point.



What happens when your trailer comes unplugged and you have *no* trailer brakes? BTDT, I was a passenger coming off a mountain. My horse was in another trailer (thankfully!), and we all survived the incident, but I'd rather be overtrucked and overbraked as undertrucked and relying on trailer brakes that may and may not work.

Steph

StefffiC
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:33 PM
If you come unplugged your trailer should be set up to lock up. There is a safety that is connected to your vehicle, it becomes detached and that's a sensor to your trailer brakes. Your trailer brakes act independent of your truck at that point.

Most trailers have breakaway breaks, so if it breaks away from your truck it stops. None that I know of lock up if the wire looses power.

yellowbritches
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:38 PM
We had a full house going to a nearby (within an hour) show once, so I hauled our two smallest horses with a client's Tahoe and little 2 horse BP. While it was far from hair raising, it was NOT my easiest drive. I did not feel the trailer was super stable behind me at all. HOWEVER, the one thing we were missing were SWAY BARS. Do that. It will make a difference.

I hate driving BPs, even with our giant truck. Give me our giant 5 horse and the dually any day over a Tahoe and a BP, but, as long as you take into account that everything is lightly, flimmsier, and just not as stable on the road, and drive accordingly, you should be fine. And get sway bars.

Susan P
Jan. 23, 2009, 02:47 PM
In my opinion, if you are just locally hauling a two horse bumper pull with a Tahoe with the right tow package, etc. and are sensible, not taking additional risks, you should be fine. I had some engine problems with my injectors and that bogged down the power and as the Tahoe aged it just wasn't doing the job anymore. But when it was newer, it was great. I felt safer hauling the trailer than when it was not on there. If I set the brakes on the trailer too much it would and did pull my Tahoe to a stop before the Tahoe would. The trailer brakes on my trailer were unreal, don't know if all trailers are like that. I always had to adjust them so they would drag my Tahoe to a stop, LOL. It's a weird experience.


I think good judgement and driving skill with experience makes for the safest ride. Just don't go 90 miles an hour. :eek:




Thank you Susan. I have done a tad bit of research on it but it has been 20 years since we have owned/pulled a bumper pull (and I was only 6 then:D), we are a strictly gooseneck family. I know that the Tahoe can pull the trailer but my concern was the shorter wheel base. I asked the trailer dealership up here and they were too busy trying to sell me a 4H with LQ (despite the fact I told them I already had one) so they were no help and the ONLY chevy dealer in the area told me that the Tahoe could pull 8,200 lbs and he "thought" I would be fine.

That is why I came here. Ya'll are a virtual cornucopia of information and experience.

I have been hauling trailers for 10 almost 11 years and spent 4 years on the road by myself hauling all over the country (even to Canada) to events (literally, I put over 250,000+ miles on my trucks). I feel confident in my hauling abilities.

I just needed some reassurance that I did not get from the people here in my area (kinda country, more used to duallys and huge rigs). They did not know much about hauling with a Tahoe b/c most of their customers take out 2nd mortgages to buy Mini Peterbuilts and HUGE LQ trailers, or atleast thats what they told me.

I appreciate the info and am going to go look at one this weekend. I am going to hook it up and haul it around. Maybe the guy will let me stick his roping mare it just to see how it hauls.

2bee
Jan. 23, 2009, 04:02 PM
What happens when your trailer comes unplugged and you have *no* trailer brakes? BTDT, I was a passenger coming off a mountain. My horse was in another trailer (thankfully!), and we all survived the incident, but I'd rather be overtrucked and overbraked as undertrucked and relying on trailer brakes that may and may not work.

Steph

What happens if the trailer's brakes go out? The same thing as if the truck's brakes go out, or any other emergency........you deal.

HOWEVER, there is no reason to have the trailer come unplugged just running down the road, I have snagged mine a few times in the field though. Nor is there any excuse to believe the trailer brakes "may and may not work". Dont run junk equipment, maintain it properly and the chance of a problem is slim.

Like I told the other poster, go do some research on brake rotor size then come back and join the discussion.

BTW, according to the owners manual my Chevy 3500 is only rated to be able to stop a 2000# unbraked trailer......the Explorer was 1500# IIRC. With the brake controller turned off, NEITHER truck would stop my loaded trailer effectively, but both could stop it adequately under normal driving circumstances.