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Blogs - Taylor Flury

August 5, 2014

Why I Am Lucky

The other week as my sister and I were packing up from a two-week show at Showplace Spring Spectacular (Lamplight, Ill.) to come home, it hit me again how lucky I am. 

Beyond the obvious reasons of that I get to show so many nice horses and I have amazing  parents and clients who support me, I was thinking that I felt lucky to know how to pack up from a show and how to haul the horses home ourselves.  

April 11, 2014

Consumer Social Responsibilty

Consumer Social Responsibility, or CSR as it is known, is something I've thought a lot about. What it means is that as consumers we have a responsibility toward society to be responsible in our purchases.

Corporations are not the only ones that have a responsibility towards society. We, as consumers, need to buy from ethical, socially responsible companies, and we need to know what we are buying. We need to know the background of the product; where it was made, who made it, and its “history.”

March 13, 2014

The Importance of Upbringing

Have you ever heard the saying “you are a product of your upbringing?” I truly believe that animals and people become what they are because of how they were raised and the environment in which they were raised.

November 18, 2013

On Not Taking Gifts For Granted

A few months ago, Role Model (I call her T-Squared since her barn name is Taylor) and I had a freak accident. We have been showing all year at 1.45-meter jumpers and while at home jumping a 3’6” oxer the unthinkable happened. We were preparing for the 7-year-old Midwest Young Jumper Regional Finals at Kentucky, and when she went to take off she tripped, and we flipped through the jump. 

October 28, 2013

Finally, A Great Young Horse Option

On my first Belgian Warmblood Breeding Association Keuring Tour a few years back I had the opportunity to meet Lisa Lourie of Spy Coast Farm. I had read many stories about her and knew of all the wonderful things she was creating and supporting to help our industry both in the show ring and the breeding ring. I was in awe of her and have to admit that I was nervous to meet her.

July 24, 2013

The Unsung Heroes Of The Barn

Ever since I was little my mom has told me, “There is no ‘I’ in team.” I always love to respond using a quote from Dr. House of the television show: “There may not be an ‘I’ in team, but there is a ‘ME’ if you jumble it around.” 

Comments

winterstar
1 year 8 weeks ago

grooms

Nice article, finally somebody that thinks about the grooms. I only wish you had said *his or her* in the last paragraph. Last I heard female grooms were still in the majority.
devvie
1 year 8 weeks ago

While I appreciate the

While I appreciate the praise, I will forever be stymied by the economics of this industry. You can afford a six-figure horse, etc. etc. etc. (need I go on?) but can't pay your grooms a salary that reflects how hard they work, Mexican or not, and provide a decent wage that will allow someone a family and a life outside your barn? Sure, we do it for the love, but if we are the most important part of your team, looking after valuable horses, why (oh why) do salaries not reflect that?
Equine Hero
1 year 8 weeks ago

Why not go one step further

Why not go one step further and as well as giving them thanks nominate the great groom in your life for an Equine Hero award by visiting equinehero.com - we are celebrating the amazing work done by dedicated horse people around the world. Each month an "Equine Hero" is chosen and due recognition is given to them - as well as a prize of $200 feed voucher :)
Emerson Lake
1 year 7 weeks ago

The horse industry

This post highlights why the horse industry is so messed up. Is there any other industry where poorly paid people are expected to do hard manual labor for wealthier people just because they love it? A horse owner may choose to work overtime and during holidays, but they have no right to impose this schedule on employees. If the grooms at this stable are working 16 hour days and seven days a week for months at a time, I certainly hope that they are compensated for the extra hours (generally at least one and one-half times their regular rate for any hours over 40/week). I certainly hope their employers are providing health insurance and other benefits. I hope this, but doubt it. Most people just exploit their barn workers and justify it because their “cherished, expensive animals” are just so deserving of love from the barn slaves. This statement captures the problem: “Horses are not a typical 40-hour work week job with paid holidays and set hours. It amazes me how many people I have had work for AliBoo Farm over the years who do not understand this concept.” Let’s replace horses with one of the many other jobs that isn’t limited to 40 hours per week. For example, “Running a hotel is not a typical 40-hour work week job with paid holidays and set hours. It amazes me how many people I have had work for my hotel who do not understand this concept.” Can hotel owners expect someone to work an eight-hour shift and then force them to do an additional four or eight hours per day (seven days a week!) just because there’s lots of work to do at the hotel and guests need services? Obviously not since this would break every labor law on the books and no one would work for them. It is the hotel owner’s responsibility to hire enough labor so that no one worker is exploited. It is NOT an employee’s responsibility to work overtime whenever the boss demands. Taylor, working at your barn isn’t that special. It’s a job and no one (except maybe you) really wants to be there 24/7. Believe it or not, barn workers would love to have time to spend with their family and friends and maybe even time to relax and pursue the occasional leisure activity. They would love to be paid a higher wage, receive benefits that are standard in other industries, and be compensated for overtime. Yes, even grooms are regular humans who have these normal wishes. Too bad that most barn owners do not want to acknowledge this inconvenient reality. It’s so much less expensive to take advantage of people who don’t have many employment options or do indeed have a generosity toward horses.
belgianWBLuver
1 year 7 weeks ago

WOW ma coqotte (that's

WOW ma coqotte (that's pressure cooker in French) you should have a look at the thread in the COTH forum. You go to the Off Course and the title is: "This COTH Article (Blog?) Rubbed Me the Wrong Way.. " Maybe those comments will teach you something for the future of your writing career. Just sayin :)
Vicki@oldeoaksfarm.com
1 year 6 weeks ago

Groom appreciation

I agree! Grooms are the unsung heros of the horse shows!! We would not be half as successful without them! I am appalled by how they are taken for granted! At the Pin Oak Charity Horse Show we try to show them how much we appreciate them. We put on a party each year just for them! We have food they like, in Texas, true Mexican food, and we buy as many items as possible to give away in a raffle. From bicycles to coolers to cologne,we try to make it fun for all!! It would not be that hard for other shows to do the same. All it takes is someone to spearhead it and a few donors. If every once in a while we showed them how much we appreciate the work they do for us, think how much happier they would be!
michelle
1 year 6 weeks ago

So what do you pay these

So what do you pay these grooms? It isn't easy to live on what grooms are paid. It is shocking that horse show people spend six figures on their kids horses but they can't pay the grooms a living wage or have enough grooms so they don't have to work 12-16 hours a day. I know many trainers that bill their clients more money per day and pocket it.
June 20, 2013

Four Lessons For More Than Just Riding

Many moons ago when I had my first lesson with Joe Fargis, he told my sister and me that we had four simple rules to follow if we wanted to ride with him. These rules have been added to over the years, but they have laid the foundation for success.  

1.)  Be on time

2.)  Make sure your boots are polished

3.)  Carry a whip

4.)  Wear spurs

Comments

StellaRills
1 year 9 weeks ago

Four Lessons for success

I too agree with Joe Fargis thoughts and lessons. This four lessons are the leading base for being a successful man. Success have some rules, in order to achieve them we must strictly follow them.
June 13, 2013

Skipping School Is Not A Smart Idea

Does it ever feel like life is just flying by? The other day I was talking to a friend about how crazy busy I have been and how many different jobs I have. We were discussing the Belgian Warmblood Paard Keuring Tour this summer where we travel around the country inspecting horses for the studbook. (More on this subject to come in a later blog.)

May 15, 2013

The Aftermath Of Five Feet Of Water

Taylor Flury had to completely evacuate AliBoo Farm with the help of family and staff when rain caused substantial flooding on April 18. The flood only lasted one day, but the clean-up continues.

May 15, 2013

The Day The Waters Rose

I didn’t sleep well on Wednesday night. I’m a natural born worrier, and it was raining so hard I thought we were in the middle of a monsoon. It was one of those rains that usually only lasts a few minutes, but it went on for hours, and I was terrified of what that amount of rain would bring in the morning.

So I was shocked when I went out to feed at 5 a.m., and it wasn’t flooding. I expected the pastures to be full of water, but they weren’t. However, by 7 we knew we were in for it because the rain was coming down hard again, and the water had started to flow south toward us.

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